Apple apologizes for iPhone slowdown controversy, will reduce out-of-warranty battery repl...

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Comments

  • Reply 221 of 233
    k2kw said:
    maxit said:
    appleempl said:
    Apple should reopen the ability to downgrade back to iOS 10.
    iOS 10 wasn’t any better than iOS 11.2
    I have IOS 10 on an iPhone 7Plus and iOS 11 on a 8Plus.   IOS 11 sucks.    keep running into APPS that they turned into crap.   This update seems to exist only because they wanted to screw over more customers  with the hidden Throttling.

     And  This was a "used Car salesman" move on Apples part.    Apple made this announcement so they could get some of the heat off of them.   I bet you Tim Cook's grandma told him that Apple screwed  her over with the update and now her phone sucked. 

    Fortunately Apple's legacy of high quality manufacturing quality established under Jobs hasn't been wiped out by the bean counter in Chief - most of the Android phones that lower manufacturing standards like the Google Pixel 1- although I imagine that the substandard battery in the iPhones were a cheap find by the "supply chain genius" Cook.
    That's why no one has been fired over this.  
    More bullshitting, come bring it on.
    watto_cobratmay
  • Reply 222 of 233
    maxit said:

    maxit said:
    foggyhill said:

    So, Apple's position is that they're throttling iPhones to make them "last as long as possible." Okay. There would be nothing wrong with that..... had they been transparent about it.

    But they hid this. It's not pro-consumer to slow down our phones and hide that we can speed things back up by spending $79 on a new battery. As others have said, many people needlessly spent $500-800 dollars upgrading to a new phone when they didn't have to. Apple's argument presents a false choice between having your phone die or having it slow down. There is a third choice - replace the battery and experience full performance. But that option wasn't disclosed to consumers. Additionally, this hidden 'feature' is nearly forced upon users due to how strongly iOS pushes for updating to the latest version upon release.

    I use (and love) Apple products, but I won't defend them on this. This is wrong, it's a huge deal, and those of us who use Apple products should demand a change. Giving users more visibility into battery health and throttling practices is a start, but it's not enough. In addition to giving users a clear-eyed choice on throttling/performance and battery replacement, Apple needs to stop strong-arming people into major iOS updates, updates which introduce both the throttling function AND the new features (which put additional strain on the processor/battery) further necessitating its use. They should continue supporting older versions of iOS with security patches for a predetermined period of time. Stop pressuring customers to update iOS through constant nags and lack of security patches on the version of iOS designed for their hardware.

    They DID NOT HIDE IT. It's in the release note. They assumed that having a throttled SOC under some circumstance is better than a dead phone, they assumed right but should have been more public in showing the degraded battery so users can make better decisions (a bit like low power mode notification).

     They'll in fact not change much here, just make what they're doing more visible..

    Apple throttles the phones a hell of a lot of times under many of circumstances; try running your a heavy phone app when very cold and see how it runs (or try running it when its very hot). You're not getting peak performance in either circumstances.
    Same request for you: could you show me the release note ? I don’t remember any reference to throttling performance...
    I don’t know what was in the release notes but Matthew Panzarino reported on it back in February. 0f course the statement they gave at the time wasn’t really clear and all the tech sites reporting on it referred to it as Apple tweaking the power management system. I don’t remember seeing anyone specifically report that Apple was throttling the processor.

    https://techcrunch.com/2017/02/23/apple-says-ios-10-2-1-has-reduced-unexpected-iphone-6s-shutdown-issues-by-80/
    Thank you very much. As I was thinking, Apple didn’t say anything about performance throttling...
    So my point stands: Apple is guilty for not warning customers about what was happening on their devices.
    And, believe me, I’m very sorry to say that...
    Power management is throtling, but go on, cry more, I'll give you tissues if you want.
    watto_cobratmay
  • Reply 223 of 233
    I can’t believe you brainiac people actually buy this story.this has been going on for years!
  • Reply 224 of 233
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,735member
    Chuckit said:
    I can’t believe you brainiac people actually buy this story.this has been going on for years!
    Did you just vomit this "genius"? Shovel your colorful bile and go to your "mensa" meeting in your head.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 225 of 233
    foggyhill said:
    maxit said:

    maxit said:
    foggyhill said:

    So, Apple's position is that they're throttling iPhones to make them "last as long as possible." Okay. There would be nothing wrong with that..... had they been transparent about it.

    But they hid this. It's not pro-consumer to slow down our phones and hide that we can speed things back up by spending $79 on a new battery. As others have said, many people needlessly spent $500-800 dollars upgrading to a new phone when they didn't have to. Apple's argument presents a false choice between having your phone die or having it slow down. There is a third choice - replace the battery and experience full performance. But that option wasn't disclosed to consumers. Additionally, this hidden 'feature' is nearly forced upon users due to how strongly iOS pushes for updating to the latest version upon release.

    I use (and love) Apple products, but I won't defend them on this. This is wrong, it's a huge deal, and those of us who use Apple products should demand a change. Giving users more visibility into battery health and throttling practices is a start, but it's not enough. In addition to giving users a clear-eyed choice on throttling/performance and battery replacement, Apple needs to stop strong-arming people into major iOS updates, updates which introduce both the throttling function AND the new features (which put additional strain on the processor/battery) further necessitating its use. They should continue supporting older versions of iOS with security patches for a predetermined period of time. Stop pressuring customers to update iOS through constant nags and lack of security patches on the version of iOS designed for their hardware.

    They DID NOT HIDE IT. It's in the release note. They assumed that having a throttled SOC under some circumstance is better than a dead phone, they assumed right but should have been more public in showing the degraded battery so users can make better decisions (a bit like low power mode notification).

     They'll in fact not change much here, just make what they're doing more visible..

    Apple throttles the phones a hell of a lot of times under many of circumstances; try running your a heavy phone app when very cold and see how it runs (or try running it when its very hot). You're not getting peak performance in either circumstances.
    Same request for you: could you show me the release note ? I don’t remember any reference to throttling performance...
    I don’t know what was in the release notes but Matthew Panzarino reported on it back in February. 0f course the statement they gave at the time wasn’t really clear and all the tech sites reporting on it referred to it as Apple tweaking the power management system. I don’t remember seeing anyone specifically report that Apple was throttling the processor.

    https://techcrunch.com/2017/02/23/apple-says-ios-10-2-1-has-reduced-unexpected-iphone-6s-shutdown-issues-by-80/
    Thank you very much. As I was thinking, Apple didn’t say anything about performance throttling...
    So my point stands: Apple is guilty for not warning customers about what was happening on their devices.
    And, believe me, I’m very sorry to say that...
    Power management is throtling, but go on, cry more, I'll give you tissues if you want.
    And the average iPhone user knows that power management equals throttling? That’s assuming the average iPhone user reads TechCrunch. Any reasonable person would agree Apple needed to do a better job of messaging here. The proof of that is they put out a message to customers apologizing for it and are making changes to iOS plus offering $50 off battery replacements. But go on, keep being a jerk and calling iPhone users stupid (without actually using the word).
    r2d2avon b7singularity
  • Reply 226 of 233
    maxit said:

    maxit said:
    foggyhill said:

    So, Apple's position is that they're throttling iPhones to make them "last as long as possible." Okay. There would be nothing wrong with that..... had they been transparent about it.

    But they hid this. It's not pro-consumer to slow down our phones and hide that we can speed things back up by spending $79 on a new battery. As others have said, many people needlessly spent $500-800 dollars upgrading to a new phone when they didn't have to. Apple's argument presents a false choice between having your phone die or having it slow down. There is a third choice - replace the battery and experience full performance. But that option wasn't disclosed to consumers. Additionally, this hidden 'feature' is nearly forced upon users due to how strongly iOS pushes for updating to the latest version upon release.

    I use (and love) Apple products, but I won't defend them on this. This is wrong, it's a huge deal, and those of us who use Apple products should demand a change. Giving users more visibility into battery health and throttling practices is a start, but it's not enough. In addition to giving users a clear-eyed choice on throttling/performance and battery replacement, Apple needs to stop strong-arming people into major iOS updates, updates which introduce both the throttling function AND the new features (which put additional strain on the processor/battery) further necessitating its use. They should continue supporting older versions of iOS with security patches for a predetermined period of time. Stop pressuring customers to update iOS through constant nags and lack of security patches on the version of iOS designed for their hardware.

    They DID NOT HIDE IT. It's in the release note. They assumed that having a throttled SOC under some circumstance is better than a dead phone, they assumed right but should have been more public in showing the degraded battery so users can make better decisions (a bit like low power mode notification).

     They'll in fact not change much here, just make what they're doing more visible..

    Apple throttles the phones a hell of a lot of times under many of circumstances; try running your a heavy phone app when very cold and see how it runs (or try running it when its very hot). You're not getting peak performance in either circumstances.
    Same request for you: could you show me the release note ? I don’t remember any reference to throttling performance...
    I don’t know what was in the release notes but Matthew Panzarino reported on it back in February. 0f course the statement they gave at the time wasn’t really clear and all the tech sites reporting on it referred to it as Apple tweaking the power management system. I don’t remember seeing anyone specifically report that Apple was throttling the processor.

    https://techcrunch.com/2017/02/23/apple-says-ios-10-2-1-has-reduced-unexpected-iphone-6s-shutdown-issues-by-80/
    Thank you very much. As I was thinking, Apple didn’t say anything about performance throttling...
    So my point stands: Apple is guilty for not warning customers about what was happening on their devices.
    And, believe me, I’m very sorry to say that...
    Apple’s statement from February doesn’t mention throttling or tweaking the power management system. All Apple’s official statement said is they made “improvements” to reduce shutdowns affecting (they claim) a small number of users. I’d love an apologist to explain to me how users are supposed to get Apple might be slowing down your phone out of the statement below. Rene Ritchie has apologized for not better explaining this back in February but that’s not his job, it’s Apple’s. They should have had a statement on their website back then with a link to this support document. https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT208387
    With iOS 10.2.1, Apple made improvements to reduce occurrences of unexpected shutdowns that a small number of users were experiencing with their iPhone. iOS 10.2.1 already has over 50% of active iOS devices upgraded and the diagnostic data we’ve received from upgraders shows that for this small percentage of users experiencing the issue, we’re seeing a more than 80% reduction in iPhone 6s and over 70% reduction on iPhone 6 of devices unexpectedly shutting down.

    We also added the ability for the phone to restart without needing to connect to power, if a user still encounters an unexpected shutdown. It is important to note that these unexpected shutdowns are not a safety issue, but we understand it can be an inconvenience and wanted to fix the issue as quickly as possible. If a customer has any issues with their device they can contact AppleCare.


    edited December 2017
  • Reply 227 of 233
    k2kwk2kw Posts: 1,328member
    foggyhill said:
    k2kw said:
    maxit said:
    appleempl said:
    Apple should reopen the ability to downgrade back to iOS 10.
    iOS 10 wasn’t any better than iOS 11.2
    I have IOS 10 on an iPhone 7Plus and iOS 11 on a 8Plus.   IOS 11 sucks.    keep running into APPS that they turned into crap.   This update seems to exist only because they wanted to screw over more customers  with the hidden Throttling.

     And  This was a "used Car salesman" move on Apples part.    Apple made this announcement so they could get some of the heat off of them.   I bet you Tim Cook's grandma told him that Apple screwed  her over with the update and now her phone sucked. 

    Fortunately Apple's legacy of high quality manufacturing quality established under Jobs hasn't been wiped out by the bean counter in Chief - most of the Android phones that lower manufacturing standards like the Google Pixel 1- although I imagine that the substandard battery in the iPhones were a cheap find by the "supply chain genius" Cook.
    That's why no one has been fired over this.  
    More bullshitting, come bring it on.
    maxit said:

    maxit said:
    foggyhill said:

    So, Apple's position is that they're throttling iPhones to make them "last as long as possible." Okay. There would be nothing wrong with that..... had they been transparent about it.

    But they hid this. It's not pro-consumer to slow down our phones and hide that we can speed things back up by spending $79 on a new battery. As others have said, many people needlessly spent $500-800 dollars upgrading to a new phone when they didn't have to. Apple's argument presents a false choice between having your phone die or having it slow down. There is a third choice - replace the battery and experience full performance. But that option wasn't disclosed to consumers. Additionally, this hidden 'feature' is nearly forced upon users due to how strongly iOS pushes for updating to the latest version upon release.

    I use (and love) Apple products, but I won't defend them on this. This is wrong, it's a huge deal, and those of us who use Apple products should demand a change. Giving users more visibility into battery health and throttling practices is a start, but it's not enough. In addition to giving users a clear-eyed choice on throttling/performance and battery replacement, Apple needs to stop strong-arming people into major iOS updates, updates which introduce both the throttling function AND the new features (which put additional strain on the processor/battery) further necessitating its use. They should continue supporting older versions of iOS with security patches for a predetermined period of time. Stop pressuring customers to update iOS through constant nags and lack of security patches on the version of iOS designed for their hardware.

    They DID NOT HIDE IT. It's in the release note. They assumed that having a throttled SOC under some circumstance is better than a dead phone, they assumed right but should have been more public in showing the degraded battery so users can make better decisions (a bit like low power mode notification).

     They'll in fact not change much here, just make what they're doing more visible..

    Apple throttles the phones a hell of a lot of times under many of circumstances; try running your a heavy phone app when very cold and see how it runs (or try running it when its very hot). You're not getting peak performance in either circumstances.
    Same request for you: could you show me the release note ? I don’t remember any reference to throttling performance...
    I don’t know what was in the release notes but Matthew Panzarino reported on it back in February. 0f course the statement they gave at the time wasn’t really clear and all the tech sites reporting on it referred to it as Apple tweaking the power management system. I don’t remember seeing anyone specifically report that Apple was throttling the processor.

    https://techcrunch.com/2017/02/23/apple-says-ios-10-2-1-has-reduced-unexpected-iphone-6s-shutdown-issues-by-80/
    Thank you very much. As I was thinking, Apple didn’t say anything about performance throttling...
    So my point stands: Apple is guilty for not warning customers about what was happening on their devices.
    And, believe me, I’m very sorry to say that...
    Apple’s statement from February doesn’t mention throttling or tweaking the power management system. All Apple’s official statement said is they made “improvements” to reduce shutdowns affecting (they claim) a small number of users. I’d love an apologist to explain to me how users are supposed to get Apple might be slowing down your phone out of the statement below. Rene Ritchie has apologized for not better explaining this back in February but that’s not his job, it’s Apple’s. They should have had a statement on their website back then with a link to this support document. https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT208387
    With iOS 10.2.1, Apple made improvements to reduce occurrences of unexpected shutdowns that a small number of users were experiencing with their iPhone. iOS 10.2.1 already has over 50% of active iOS devices upgraded and the diagnostic data we’ve received from upgraders shows that for this small percentage of users experiencing the issue, we’re seeing a more than 80% reduction in iPhone 6s and over 70% reduction on iPhone 6 of devices unexpectedly shutting down.

    We also added the ability for the phone to restart without needing to connect to power, if a user still encounters an unexpected shutdown. It is important to note that these unexpected shutdowns are not a safety issue, but we understand it can be an inconvenience and wanted to fix the issue as quickly as possible. If a customer has any issues with their device they can contact AppleCare.


    Unfortunately I don't think we will get the full truth behind this problem unless Cook, Riccio, and Federighi are called to testify in front of Congress.   I would imagine that AppleCare is warrantee insurance and this should be investigated as Insurance Fraud.  I'm sure their latest two statements were poured over by Apple's legal department (not that Apple Legal is very impressive).

    Without a doubt 2018Q1 will have outstanding performance and I expect the rest of the year to also have great results YOY due to hight ASP.    The only question I wonder is if the new X brings in new customers to the Apple Ecosystem. 
  • Reply 228 of 233
    r2d2r2d2 Posts: 95member
    No mainstream news about the note 8 and galaxy 8 new battery issues when battery completely drains phone will not turn back on
    But her emails!
  • Reply 229 of 233
    k2kw said:
    foggyhill said:
    k2kw said:
    maxit said:
    appleempl said:
    Apple should reopen the ability to downgrade back to iOS 10.
    iOS 10 wasn’t any better than iOS 11.2
    I have IOS 10 on an iPhone 7Plus and iOS 11 on a 8Plus.   IOS 11 sucks.    keep running into APPS that they turned into crap.   This update seems to exist only because they wanted to screw over more customers  with the hidden Throttling.

     And  This was a "used Car salesman" move on Apples part.    Apple made this announcement so they could get some of the heat off of them.   I bet you Tim Cook's grandma told him that Apple screwed  her over with the update and now her phone sucked. 

    Fortunately Apple's legacy of high quality manufacturing quality established under Jobs hasn't been wiped out by the bean counter in Chief - most of the Android phones that lower manufacturing standards like the Google Pixel 1- although I imagine that the substandard battery in the iPhones were a cheap find by the "supply chain genius" Cook.
    That's why no one has been fired over this.  
    More bullshitting, come bring it on.
    maxit said:

    maxit said:
    foggyhill said:

    So, Apple's position is that they're throttling iPhones to make them "last as long as possible." Okay. There would be nothing wrong with that..... had they been transparent about it.

    But they hid this. It's not pro-consumer to slow down our phones and hide that we can speed things back up by spending $79 on a new battery. As others have said, many people needlessly spent $500-800 dollars upgrading to a new phone when they didn't have to. Apple's argument presents a false choice between having your phone die or having it slow down. There is a third choice - replace the battery and experience full performance. But that option wasn't disclosed to consumers. Additionally, this hidden 'feature' is nearly forced upon users due to how strongly iOS pushes for updating to the latest version upon release.

    I use (and love) Apple products, but I won't defend them on this. This is wrong, it's a huge deal, and those of us who use Apple products should demand a change. Giving users more visibility into battery health and throttling practices is a start, but it's not enough. In addition to giving users a clear-eyed choice on throttling/performance and battery replacement, Apple needs to stop strong-arming people into major iOS updates, updates which introduce both the throttling function AND the new features (which put additional strain on the processor/battery) further necessitating its use. They should continue supporting older versions of iOS with security patches for a predetermined period of time. Stop pressuring customers to update iOS through constant nags and lack of security patches on the version of iOS designed for their hardware.

    They DID NOT HIDE IT. It's in the release note. They assumed that having a throttled SOC under some circumstance is better than a dead phone, they assumed right but should have been more public in showing the degraded battery so users can make better decisions (a bit like low power mode notification).

     They'll in fact not change much here, just make what they're doing more visible..

    Apple throttles the phones a hell of a lot of times under many of circumstances; try running your a heavy phone app when very cold and see how it runs (or try running it when its very hot). You're not getting peak performance in either circumstances.
    Same request for you: could you show me the release note ? I don’t remember any reference to throttling performance...
    I don’t know what was in the release notes but Matthew Panzarino reported on it back in February. 0f course the statement they gave at the time wasn’t really clear and all the tech sites reporting on it referred to it as Apple tweaking the power management system. I don’t remember seeing anyone specifically report that Apple was throttling the processor.

    https://techcrunch.com/2017/02/23/apple-says-ios-10-2-1-has-reduced-unexpected-iphone-6s-shutdown-issues-by-80/
    Thank you very much. As I was thinking, Apple didn’t say anything about performance throttling...
    So my point stands: Apple is guilty for not warning customers about what was happening on their devices.
    And, believe me, I’m very sorry to say that...
    Apple’s statement from February doesn’t mention throttling or tweaking the power management system. All Apple’s official statement said is they made “improvements” to reduce shutdowns affecting (they claim) a small number of users. I’d love an apologist to explain to me how users are supposed to get Apple might be slowing down your phone out of the statement below. Rene Ritchie has apologized for not better explaining this back in February but that’s not his job, it’s Apple’s. They should have had a statement on their website back then with a link to this support document. https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT208387
    With iOS 10.2.1, Apple made improvements to reduce occurrences of unexpected shutdowns that a small number of users were experiencing with their iPhone. iOS 10.2.1 already has over 50% of active iOS devices upgraded and the diagnostic data we’ve received from upgraders shows that for this small percentage of users experiencing the issue, we’re seeing a more than 80% reduction in iPhone 6s and over 70% reduction on iPhone 6 of devices unexpectedly shutting down.

    We also added the ability for the phone to restart without needing to connect to power, if a user still encounters an unexpected shutdown. It is important to note that these unexpected shutdowns are not a safety issue, but we understand it can be an inconvenience and wanted to fix the issue as quickly as possible. If a customer has any issues with their device they can contact AppleCare.


    Unfortunately I don't think we will get the full truth behind this problem unless Cook, Riccio, and Federighi are called to testify in front of Congress.   I would imagine that AppleCare is warrantee insurance and this should be investigated as Insurance Fraud.  I'm sure their latest two statements were poured over by Apple's legal department (not that Apple Legal is very impressive).

    Without a doubt 2018Q1 will have outstanding performance and I expect the rest of the year to also have great results YOY due to hight ASP.    The only question I wonder is if the new X brings in new customers to the Apple Ecosystem. 
    My question is, is this an issue of the SoC being too powerful for the size of batteries they use? Or is this totally normal and acceptable and just a messaging problem. And the Android OEMs not doing this do their phones just randomly shut down after the battery gets to a certain age but nobody ever made a big deal about it? 
  • Reply 231 of 233
    k2kwk2kw Posts: 1,328member
    k2kw said:
    foggyhill said:
    k2kw said:
    maxit said:
    appleempl said:
    Apple should reopen the ability to downgrade back to iOS 10.
    iOS 10 wasn’t any better than iOS 11.2
    I have IOS 10 on an iPhone 7Plus and iOS 11 on a 8Plus.   IOS 11 sucks.    keep running into APPS that they turned into crap.   This update seems to exist only because they wanted to screw over more customers  with the hidden Throttling.

     And  This was a "used Car salesman" move on Apples part.    Apple made this announcement so they could get some of the heat off of them.   I bet you Tim Cook's grandma told him that Apple screwed  her over with the update and now her phone sucked. 

    Fortunately Apple's legacy of high quality manufacturing quality established under Jobs hasn't been wiped out by the bean counter in Chief - most of the Android phones that lower manufacturing standards like the Google Pixel 1- although I imagine that the substandard battery in the iPhones were a cheap find by the "supply chain genius" Cook.
    That's why no one has been fired over this.  
    More bullshitting, come bring it on.
    maxit said:

    maxit said:
    foggyhill said:

    So, Apple's position is that they're throttling iPhones to make them "last as long as possible." Okay. There would be nothing wrong with that..... had they been transparent about it.

    But they hid this. It's not pro-consumer to slow down our phones and hide that we can speed things back up by spending $79 on a new battery. As others have said, many people needlessly spent $500-800 dollars upgrading to a new phone when they didn't have to. Apple's argument presents a false choice between having your phone die or having it slow down. There is a third choice - replace the battery and experience full performance. But that option wasn't disclosed to consumers. Additionally, this hidden 'feature' is nearly forced upon users due to how strongly iOS pushes for updating to the latest version upon release.

    I use (and love) Apple products, but I won't defend them on this. This is wrong, it's a huge deal, and those of us who use Apple products should demand a change. Giving users more visibility into battery health and throttling practices is a start, but it's not enough. In addition to giving users a clear-eyed choice on throttling/performance and battery replacement, Apple needs to stop strong-arming people into major iOS updates, updates which introduce both the throttling function AND the new features (which put additional strain on the processor/battery) further necessitating its use. They should continue supporting older versions of iOS with security patches for a predetermined period of time. Stop pressuring customers to update iOS through constant nags and lack of security patches on the version of iOS designed for their hardware.

    They DID NOT HIDE IT. It's in the release note. They assumed that having a throttled SOC under some circumstance is better than a dead phone, they assumed right but should have been more public in showing the degraded battery so users can make better decisions (a bit like low power mode notification).

     They'll in fact not change much here, just make what they're doing more visible..

    Apple throttles the phones a hell of a lot of times under many of circumstances; try running your a heavy phone app when very cold and see how it runs (or try running it when its very hot). You're not getting peak performance in either circumstances.
    Same request for you: could you show me the release note ? I don’t remember any reference to throttling performance...
    I don’t know what was in the release notes but Matthew Panzarino reported on it back in February. 0f course the statement they gave at the time wasn’t really clear and all the tech sites reporting on it referred to it as Apple tweaking the power management system. I don’t remember seeing anyone specifically report that Apple was throttling the processor.

    https://techcrunch.com/2017/02/23/apple-says-ios-10-2-1-has-reduced-unexpected-iphone-6s-shutdown-issues-by-80/
    Thank you very much. As I was thinking, Apple didn’t say anything about performance throttling...
    So my point stands: Apple is guilty for not warning customers about what was happening on their devices.
    And, believe me, I’m very sorry to say that...
    Apple’s statement from February doesn’t mention throttling or tweaking the power management system. All Apple’s official statement said is they made “improvements” to reduce shutdowns affecting (they claim) a small number of users. I’d love an apologist to explain to me how users are supposed to get Apple owing down your phone out of the statement below. Rene Ritchie has apologized for not better explaining this back in February but that’s not his job, it’s Apple’s. They should have had a statement on their website back then with a link to this support document. https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT208387
    With iOS 10.2.1, Apple made improvements to reduce occurrences of unexpected shutdowns that a small number of users were experiencing with their iPhone. iOS 10.2.1 already has over 50% of active iOS devices upgraded and the diagnostic data we’ve received from upgraders shows that for this small percentage of users experiencing the issue, we’re seeing a more than 80% reduction in iPhone 6s and over 70% reduction on iPhone 6 of devices unexpectedly shutting down.

    We also added the ability for the phone to restart without needing to connect to power, if a user still encounters an unexpected shutdown. It is important to note that these unexpected shutdowns are not a safety issue, but we understand it can be an inconvenience and wanted to fix the issue as quickly as possible. If a customer has any issues with their device they can contact AppleCare.


    Unfortunately I don't think we will get the full truth behind this problem unless Cook, Riccio, and Federighi are called to testify in front of Congress.   I would imagine that AppleCare is warrantee insurance and this should be investigated as Insurance Fraud.  I'm sure their latest two statements were poured over by Apple's legal department (not that Apple Legal is very impressive).

    Without a doubt 2018Q1 will have outstanding performance and I expect the rest of the year to also have great results YOY due to hight ASP.    The only question I wonder is if the new X brings in new customers to the Apple Ecosystem. 
    My question is, is this an issue of the SoC being too powerful for the size of batteries they use? Or is this totally normal and acceptable and just a messaging problem. And the Android OEMs not doing this do their phones just randomly shut down after the battery gets to a certain age but nobody ever made a big deal about it? 
    Just because the Android OEM's don't throttle their batteries, I don't think that I've seen any news article saying that Google hasn't either put code into Android to throttle Android APPS or that it may be a natural side effect of something like garbage cleanup (I'm still assuming Android still runs a Java runtime).

    Back when Google came out with KitKat they focused on enabling Android to run on lower hardware since Android is a platform for Googles advertising.    Maybe this helps with their battery situation.

    I wish that Apple would provide security updates separate from Application updates, short of that I've turned of automatic OS updates because I find changes in 11 so annoying on my 8Plus.   I also think that they should wait till an extra month or two before pushing new operating systems to old phones.   That way fewer people get hit with bugs.   Work out the bugs on the new hardware first.    Then when it seems stable then release to prior year's phones.   It wouldn't hurt for Apple to have a year focusing on fixing, optimizing, and cleaning up in the OS.   Especially now that there are 3 flavors of iOS (iPad, iPhone X, and ipHone 8 & earlier).
  • Reply 232 of 233
    I think this whole thing is an example of Apple being a victim of its own success. Apple has always been held to a higher standard than other tech companies, and so their screwups will bounce around the echo chamber a lot longer than, say when Samsung’s phones explode in people’s pockets. This higher standard also results in a cognitive bias. When Samsung screws up, it’s less of a big deal, because Samsung’s products aren’t as highly regarded as Apple products. Apple is expected to be perfect (and they’re hated for that same reason), but Samsung and lesser manufacturers have lower expectations placed on them. When Apple messes up, it’s headline news; when Samsung screws up, no one is really all that surprised.
    I agreed with what was said on the AI podcast, that Apple’s biggest mistake was not being clear on the battery issue early on. Now, even though the letter is good and sounds sincere, the press and Apple-haters will say that Apple is just trying to cover their ass for being “found out”. I mean, some people will always hate Apple, and nothing can be done for them, but Apple should have gotten in front of this mess before it became a problem. Especially because it plays directly into the “Apple sells overpriced crap” narrative. It’s good that Apple reduced the replacement battery price to $29, but they should make that permanent to demonstrate that they’re sincere about taking care of their customers.
    Apple will recover from this, but hopefully they have learned something about communicating issues in a timely manner.
  • Reply 233 of 233
    Hawker_JHawker_J Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    Does this mean if a battery is replaced the software and sensors? realise this that it will come back up to speed? Clever software??
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