Law firm that extracted $450M settlement in Apple e-books case is going after company for ...

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  • Reply 141 of 178
    magman1979magman1979 Posts: 1,009member
    maxit said:

    feudalist said:
    alandail said:
    bluefire1 said:
    Apple should have known better.
    All they did was fix a problem.  Now they are being sued for fixing it.
    No, they did not fix anything. They buried, and now they want as to pay twice for design flaw. 
    This is not about aged or depleted batteries because in that case it is implicated that iphone is no better than for a year or so of mild use. This is about tipical apple product: well designed, well built, durable and dependable. Usually best in class. But no more. After only one year we are req. to spend another 80 bucks for own property to retain performance. No, that’s not apple and I’m not willing to accept that kind of usefull life of most expensive product in its class. You should not either
    Ignorant nonsense full of half truths and outright lies. Congratulations on your first post. 

    One year of casual use will not cause your battery to fail the impedance checks as you claim. Nor will above casual use as most of us can attest to. You’d have to run 2-3 full charge cycles a day to wear down your battery that far. 

    Go troll your FUD elsewhere.
    Are you absolutely sure about that ? Because I saw something very different, and as a big Apple fanboy I was shocked. A throttled iPhone SE, 8 months old. We took the phone to the Apple store and they told us the battery was absolutely fine, with 92% health reported. So why the throttling? The genius wasn’t able to provide for an explanation and told us it was just ok...
    Have you ever stopped to consider the possibility that this iPhone SE just had a defective cell? It’s not underheard of, and even though a battery can show 92% health on a static analysis, if the cell is defective, it will fluctuate wildly once placed under load.

    Here actually we may be exposing a deficiency in Apple’s testing protocol, as they take a static “ping” if you will of the current battery state to determine the life, but that ping takes place when the phone is nearly idle. Defective cells expose their issues whilst under load. If Apple were to place a high load on the CPU and then check battery health, so as to implement a form a stress testing, this would likely yield a more accurate health analysis.

    In any case, your iPhone sounds like it just had a defective battery.
  • Reply 142 of 178
    I think Apple made an intelligent decision to throttle instead of allowing a shutdown. What is the limit of what we expect a company to divulge about every background process going on in their device? Do we really need to know this? The Apple design is squeezing every last bit of usefulness from the phone instead of forcing an owner to replace the battery or buy a new phone. I look at this as suing a car manufacturer because your automatic transmission downshifts when under a load. You might not get top speed, but you will get up that hill and then back to normal.
    Soli
  • Reply 143 of 178
    maxitmaxit Posts: 196member
    atomic101 said:
    atomic101 said:
    lkrupp said:
    What we’re seeing right now is unadulterated hysteria. Every user who even suspects their phone is running slower will now be absolutely 100% sure it’s Apple doing the dirty deed on them. We’ll just need to let the legal process work its way through and hope intelligence and evidence rules the day, not hysteria and conspiracy theories.
    Agreed that some will try to take advantage of this situation. There will be dishonesty throughout. I’m trying to stand up for those who are not part of that group and who have truly been done a disservice by a questionably shady business decision on Apple’s part.  
    What... You are not eligible to have any control on the throttling of your device or your computer. Did you sign a contract with Apple or any other computer manufacturer to not throttle your computer? You buy their hardware knowing in advance that the operating system performs thermal management to protect your computer from burning up. Now you can't say "I am cheated...." If your smartphone explodes in your ass pocket Geekbench won’t save your ass.

    Then as a company, when I go to have it tested/replaced, don't tell me that my battery is "good". 

    That’s the point I cant understand. They are saying those batteries are “good”, and they are throttling it nonetheless... Why ???
    atomic101
  • Reply 144 of 178
    maxitmaxit Posts: 196member
    atomic101 said:
    entropys said:
    Atomic, I doubt your SE is being throttled if your battery is performing at 86% capacity. Have you considered you have an older generation CPU trying to run the latest generation OS?

    I find it fascinating that people buy an older gen device expecting it to last as long as latest gen devices, and perform as well when software optimised for those latest gen, more powerful devices is installed. There is a reason they don’t cost as much.

    also, if you are so desperate to replace the battery in your out of warranty device, there are any number of mall shops that would do it for you. Heck you could do it yourself!
    As I suspected, the denialist mentality in full force.  YES, I did consider the fact that it was an older gen CPU running the latest OS.  That’s what always suspected until I analyzed the situation on my own.  You guys act like anyone who expresses an opinion that is contrary to the Apple party line is ignorant.  I’m a long time hobbyist, tech geek, and even have a minor computer science background.  And my next step WAS to replace the “good” battery myself with an iFixit repair kit since Apple didn’t seem to want my business in an official capacity. Although I’m sure they would have gladly offered me to take a look at an iPhone 8 or X. Now that Apple has been forced to come clean, I will reevaluate the manner of replacement. 

    Read my post. The phone increases its throttle level by battery charge level. What I didn’t mention was that at 100% charge, the CPU is at full speed. Yes.... the full 1850 MHz for the first few minutes of use. By the time the charge drops a few points, we’re at 1500 MHz, and the stutters begin to mount.  Below 90%, it’s usually at 1200 MHz, and from there you can expect it to bounce around from 1200 to 911 MHz until below 70% charge. So for the majority of my day, my phone acts and feels not like a still capable iPhone SE, but like my older iPhone 5S.  The gradual throttling is palpable. I can feel it in the increased lag and stutters as the clock speed decreases. Geekbench and my own fingers prove it. 

    Until upgrading to iOS 11, the phone was perfectly speedy.  No issues with battery life, no jumping battery charge indications, and no unexpected shutdowns. It was very nice of Apple to add this feature to my 15 month old phone to make sure I knew that there was flashy new product on the shelf. 
    Again since you didn’t respond - Hate to burst your conspiracy bubble, but this wasn’t an iOS 11 feature. 10.2.1 or such. So now what do you say? By your own admission your phone was speedy WITH the throttling routine present. 

    Sounds like the “denialist” is you. You’re denying the reality that peak power draw throttle isn’t what’s making your phone slow. 
    Well one thing this proves is how awful iOS 11 has been. I’ve seen numerous posts across tech/rumor sites,  social media etc. from users saying they had no issues with iOS 10 but iOS 11 has been awful. I know I’ve experienced issues on my iPad Pro of the screen being unresponsive, especially in Safari. Never had that issue with iOS 10.
    Could you be more specific about your iPad Pro issue ? I’m having a strange behavior on mine (sometimes during Safari scrolling the screen seems to “freeze” until I don’t raise and lower the finger again on the screen itself...
  • Reply 145 of 178
    maxitmaxit Posts: 196member
    maxit said:

    feudalist said:
    alandail said:
    bluefire1 said:
    Apple should have known better.
    All they did was fix a problem.  Now they are being sued for fixing it.
    No, they did not fix anything. They buried, and now they want as to pay twice for design flaw. 
    This is not about aged or depleted batteries because in that case it is implicated that iphone is no better than for a year or so of mild use. This is about tipical apple product: well designed, well built, durable and dependable. Usually best in class. But no more. After only one year we are req. to spend another 80 bucks for own property to retain performance. No, that’s not apple and I’m not willing to accept that kind of usefull life of most expensive product in its class. You should not either
    Ignorant nonsense full of half truths and outright lies. Congratulations on your first post. 

    One year of casual use will not cause your battery to fail the impedance checks as you claim. Nor will above casual use as most of us can attest to. You’d have to run 2-3 full charge cycles a day to wear down your battery that far. 

    Go troll your FUD elsewhere.
    Are you absolutely sure about that ? Because I saw something very different, and as a big Apple fanboy I was shocked. A throttled iPhone SE, 8 months old. We took the phone to the Apple store and they told us the battery was absolutely fine, with 92% health reported. So why the throttling? The genius wasn’t able to provide for an explanation and told us it was just ok...
    Have you ever stopped to consider the possibility that this iPhone SE just had a defective cell? It’s not underheard of, and even though a battery can show 92% health on a static analysis, if the cell is defective, it will fluctuate wildly once placed under load.

    Here actually we may be exposing a deficiency in Apple’s testing protocol, as they take a static “ping” if you will of the current battery state to determine the life, but that ping takes place when the phone is nearly idle. Defective cells expose their issues whilst under load. If Apple were to place a high load on the CPU and then check battery health, so as to implement a form a stress testing, this would likely yield a more accurate health analysis.

    In any case, your iPhone sounds like it just had a defective battery.
    It is not mine (I have an iPhone 8 Plus), but I was interested because I’m quite expert on Apple’s stuff and my friend was seeking for an advice...
    It could be a defective battery, sure, but for that reason we took it to the Apple Store and they refused to service it because it was considered as PERFECTLY OK.
    So what are our options ?
  • Reply 146 of 178

    I love how uninformed and technically simple-minded folk such as yourself cling to benchmark results as gospel for explaining your uninformed conclusions...

    What is the definition of a performance benchmark?

    It means what a certain piece of technology can achieve performance wise when pushed to it's limit.
    ...

    You are deflecting, attacking and insulting other people. Why?

    This throtling issue is confirmed by Apple, so there is no need to invoke unrelated performance problems.

    muthuk_vanalingam78Bandit
  • Reply 147 of 178
    airnerdairnerd Posts: 505member
    Lost in all this batterygate garbage, and it is garbage, is if my iPhone 6 which I (stupidly I know, I know) had a 3rd party battery installed in is eligible for the $29 battery.  The warranty should be void, and I knew that when I did it.  So can I still get it done or am I SOL? 
  • Reply 148 of 178
    k2kwk2kw Posts: 1,214member
    According to PatentlyApple, there are now 27 (and counting, I'm sure) Class Action Lawsuits about the battery slowdown issue.
    They'll have to bring back Michael Bromwich to keep Apple in line.
  • Reply 149 of 178
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 4,561member
    feudalist said:
    feudalist said:
    For F*** sake.. They’re all a pack of whingers... if you don’t like Apple and how they make their phones and IOS.. F*** off and buy an Android. You people are pathetic and think the world owes you everything. Batteries wear out and apple does it’s best to make sure you get the best out of it with a degraded battery. Just STFU AND REPLACE THE BATTERY like normal people do when it’s worn out . With all you litigious A Holes their won’t be an Apple in Years to come
    This is contract issue, they advertise, we buy. Throtling to oblivion, secretly, after the terms are consumed, is breach of contract. Yes, they are obliged to restore device to agreed perfomance minus expected wear&tear. 
    You’re making that up, that isn’t what they implemented. If your phone is slowed to oblivion it’s not the peak power draw throttling.
    You are to much attached to single words. Look at little wider. So, there is geekbench anallysis, before 10.2.1 there is only one point - max performance. After, there is more points, some of them in first quarter. Read it - for times less performance. Some users reported having to wait something about ten sec to start camera!! Unusable, then. 
    And that is most certainly not peak power draw throttling . Connected blogger John Gruber has commented on that specifically.
    edited January 8
  • Reply 150 of 178
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 4,561member
    atomic101 said:
    atomic101 said:
    atomic101 said:
    entropys said:
    Atomic, I doubt your SE is being throttled if your battery is performing at 86% capacity. Have you considered you have an older generation CPU trying to run the latest generation OS?

    I find it fascinating that people buy an older gen device expecting it to last as long as latest gen devices, and perform as well when software optimised for those latest gen, more powerful devices is installed. There is a reason they don’t cost as much.

    also, if you are so desperate to replace the battery in your out of warranty device, there are any number of mall shops that would do it for you. Heck you could do it yourself!
    Read my post. The phone increases its throttle level by battery charge level. What I didn’t mention was that at 100% charge, the CPU is at full speed. Yes.... the full 1850 MHz for the first few minutes of use. By the time the charge drops a few points, we’re at 1500 MHz, and the stutters begin to mount.  Below 90%, it’s usually at 1200 MHz, and from there you can expect it to bounce around from 1200 to 911 MHz until below 70% charge. So for the majority of my day, my phone acts and feels not like a still capable iPhone SE, but like my older iPhone 5S.  The gradual throttling is palpable. I can feel it in the increased lag and stutters as the clock speed decreases. Geekbench and my own fingers prove it.

    Until upgrading to iOS 11, the phone was perfectly speedy.  No issues with battery life, no jumping battery charge indications, and no unexpected shutdowns. It was very nice of Apple to add this feature to my 15 month old phone to make sure I knew that there was flashy new product on the shelf. 
    Hate to burst your conspiracy bubble, but this wasn’t an iOS 11 feature. 10.2.1 or such. Oops. Now whatcha gonna blame?

    Sounds to me your non-speedy SE is simply older hardware running a new OS and is normal. 
    Gotcha gotcha. The feature initially rolled out for specific phones for a specific bug. Who is to say that Apple hasn't rolled out the feature in more devices and/or tweaked it's characteristics in iOS 11?
    Yes and who is to say the moon's core isn't comprised of braised short ribs?
    Oh brother... I should have known better than to try to bring a dissenting opinion to an Apple apologist forum.  I'm no longer interested in defending myself among a pack of wolves who seem to be fighting to maintain an Apple stock price in light of some very bad press.  Not everyone with a negative comment against an Apple policy is a troll or ignoramus.

    You’re a troll when you call those who use reason and rationality “apologists”. 

    You claimed youve been throttled, but also claimed it was fine before iOS 11. I presented you with facts that show problems with your self-diagnosis, namely that throttling came in 10.2.1. Now you’re pissy and calling people names. 

    Troll is as troll does. 
    magman1979
  • Reply 151 of 178
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 4,561member
    maxit said:
    Rayz2016 said:
    kimberly said:

     Missing in the Apple apology was an undertaking to provide the user with an IOS Settings choice 'Throttle/No Throttle & Accept Risks' once the battery performance drops to threshhold ... maybe someone on AI can explain whether giving the user a choice in IOS Settings is problematic.
    Because the number of people who would prefer to have their phone crash unexpectedly rather than slow down occasionally due to an ageing battery is  very small.

    I think it's worth pointing out that this "slowing down" only occurs when the battery needs replacing, and even then it is only when the battery (the one that needs replacing) cannot cope with load demanded by the processor. In reality, few users run their phone's processor at full pelt all the time. 
    Unfortunately Apple isn’t giving the whole story here... I personally witnessed a less than a year old iPhone throttled (30% lower Geekbench score) with a battery whose health was assessed at 92% by an Apple genius at the Store...
    maxit said:

    feudalist said:
    alandail said:
    bluefire1 said:
    Apple should have known better.
    All they did was fix a problem.  Now they are being sued for fixing it.
    No, they did not fix anything. They buried, and now they want as to pay twice for design flaw. 
    This is not about aged or depleted batteries because in that case it is implicated that iphone is no better than for a year or so of mild use. This is about tipical apple product: well designed, well built, durable and dependable. Usually best in class. But no more. After only one year we are req. to spend another 80 bucks for own property to retain performance. No, that’s not apple and I’m not willing to accept that kind of usefull life of most expensive product in its class. You should not either
    Ignorant nonsense full of half truths and outright lies. Congratulations on your first post. 

    One year of casual use will not cause your battery to fail the impedance checks as you claim. Nor will above casual use as most of us can attest to. You’d have to run 2-3 full charge cycles a day to wear down your battery that far. 

    Go troll your FUD elsewhere.
    Are you absolutely sure about that ? Because I saw something very different, and as a big Apple fanboy I was shocked. A throttled iPhone SE, 8 months old. We took the phone to the Apple store and they told us the battery was absolutely fine, with 92% health reported. So why the throttling? The genius wasn’t able to provide for an explanation and told us it was just ok...
    You don’t know that the peak power draw throttling is at issue here. 
    Solimagman1979
  • Reply 152 of 178
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 4,561member
    feudalist said:

    I love how uninformed and technically simple-minded folk such as yourself cling to benchmark results as gospel for explaining your uninformed conclusions...

    What is the definition of a performance benchmark?

    It means what a certain piece of technology can achieve performance wise when pushed to it's limit.
    ...

    You are deflecting, attacking and insulting other people. Why?

    This throtling issue is confirmed by Apple, so there is no need to invoke unrelated performance problems.

    Sure there is, because plenty of people are conflating any perceived performance issue with the peak power draw throttling, despite not knowing if its this or that. People are complaining about general slowness only since upgrading to iOS 11, of their camera app taking 10 seconds to load, etc...which isn’t peak power draw throttling and a sign of their confusion. 

    Thats is not an insult nor an attack. You’re being defensive. Why?
    edited January 8 Solimagman1979
  • Reply 153 of 178
    rogifan_newrogifan_new Posts: 2,751member
    maxit said:
    atomic101 said:
    entropys said:
    Atomic, I doubt your SE is being throttled if your battery is performing at 86% capacity. Have you considered you have an older generation CPU trying to run the latest generation OS?

    I find it fascinating that people buy an older gen device expecting it to last as long as latest gen devices, and perform as well when software optimised for those latest gen, more powerful devices is installed. There is a reason they don’t cost as much.

    also, if you are so desperate to replace the battery in your out of warranty device, there are any number of mall shops that would do it for you. Heck you could do it yourself!
    As I suspected, the denialist mentality in full force.  YES, I did consider the fact that it was an older gen CPU running the latest OS.  That’s what always suspected until I analyzed the situation on my own.  You guys act like anyone who expresses an opinion that is contrary to the Apple party line is ignorant.  I’m a long time hobbyist, tech geek, and even have a minor computer science background.  And my next step WAS to replace the “good” battery myself with an iFixit repair kit since Apple didn’t seem to want my business in an official capacity. Although I’m sure they would have gladly offered me to take a look at an iPhone 8 or X. Now that Apple has been forced to come clean, I will reevaluate the manner of replacement. 

    Read my post. The phone increases its throttle level by battery charge level. What I didn’t mention was that at 100% charge, the CPU is at full speed. Yes.... the full 1850 MHz for the first few minutes of use. By the time the charge drops a few points, we’re at 1500 MHz, and the stutters begin to mount.  Below 90%, it’s usually at 1200 MHz, and from there you can expect it to bounce around from 1200 to 911 MHz until below 70% charge. So for the majority of my day, my phone acts and feels not like a still capable iPhone SE, but like my older iPhone 5S.  The gradual throttling is palpable. I can feel it in the increased lag and stutters as the clock speed decreases. Geekbench and my own fingers prove it. 

    Until upgrading to iOS 11, the phone was perfectly speedy.  No issues with battery life, no jumping battery charge indications, and no unexpected shutdowns. It was very nice of Apple to add this feature to my 15 month old phone to make sure I knew that there was flashy new product on the shelf. 
    Again since you didn’t respond - Hate to burst your conspiracy bubble, but this wasn’t an iOS 11 feature. 10.2.1 or such. So now what do you say? By your own admission your phone was speedy WITH the throttling routine present. 

    Sounds like the “denialist” is you. You’re denying the reality that peak power draw throttle isn’t what’s making your phone slow. 
    Well one thing this proves is how awful iOS 11 has been. I’ve seen numerous posts across tech/rumor sites,  social media etc. from users saying they had no issues with iOS 10 but iOS 11 has been awful. I know I’ve experienced issues on my iPad Pro of the screen being unresponsive, especially in Safari. Never had that issue with iOS 10.
    Could you be more specific about your iPad Pro issue ? I’m having a strange behavior on mine (sometimes during Safari scrolling the screen seems to “freeze” until I don’t raise and lower the finger again on the screen itself...
    Yes I’m having something similar to that. I notice the screen freezes mostly in Safari. I haven’t taken it to an Apple store because it’s not easy to replicate consistently.
  • Reply 154 of 178
    feudalist said:

    I love how uninformed and technically simple-minded folk such as yourself cling to benchmark results as gospel for explaining your uninformed conclusions...

    What is the definition of a performance benchmark?

    It means what a certain piece of technology can achieve performance wise when pushed to it's limit.
    ...

    You are deflecting, attacking and insulting other people. Why?

    This throtling issue is confirmed by Apple, so there is no need to invoke unrelated performance problems.

    Sure there is, because plenty of people are conflating any perceived performance issue with the peak power draw throttling, despite not knowing if its this or that. People are complaining about general slowness only since upgrading to iOS 11, of their camera app taking 10 seconds to load, etc...which isn’t peak power draw throttling and a sign of their confusion. 

    Thats is not an insult nor an attack. You’re being defensive. Why?

    While I agree that it is NOT a peak power draw throttling issue, it is STILL AN ISSUE that the user is experiencing, isn't it??? After installing a software update literally forced upon by Apple, the user has an issue with the performance of the device and the user needs a solution. At the end of the day, your solution is - go to an Apple store to find out the root cause of the problem. That is good in theory. Just because Apple store is nearer to your house/office OR you have enough time to go to an Apple store even if it is far away DOES NOT mean that everyone else has the same luxury. The end-user has to waste time for a problem created by a company and all I hear from you is - the user is to blame here, not the company which literally forces it on the end-user OR does not allow the user to go back to previous stable version.


    Why can't you think from user perspective, in terms of what they are going through and see why they complain? Why do you feel the necessity to think only from Apple's perspective and defend them at ANY cost? Why can't you empathize with the people who face a problem? Are you saying there is NO problem at all EVER AND it is all false accusations and imaginations? In my own experience - Given a choice, I would go all the way back to iOS 7 in my first generation iPad Air - it was near flawless, performance and usability wise. It is crawling with iOS 10 now. There is a REAL problem with software updates shoveled on the throat by Apple.

    feudalistatomic101
  • Reply 155 of 178
    feudalist said:

    I love how uninformed and technically simple-minded folk such as yourself cling to benchmark results as gospel for explaining your uninformed conclusions...

    What is the definition of a performance benchmark?

    It means what a certain piece of technology can achieve performance wise when pushed to it's limit.
    ...

    You are deflecting, attacking and insulting other people. Why?

    This throtling issue is confirmed by Apple, so there is no need to invoke unrelated performance problems.

    Sure there is, because plenty of people are conflating any perceived performance issue with the peak power draw throttling, despite not knowing if its this or that. People are complaining about general slowness only since upgrading to iOS 11, of their camera app taking 10 seconds to load, etc...which isn’t peak power draw throttling and a sign of their confusion. 

    Thats is not an insult nor an attack. You’re being defensive. Why?
    This conversation is about lawsuit regarding confirmed throtling. I dont know exact number of affected units, only Apple knows that. So calling names, deflecting etc is new decent, kind and inteligent conversation? Thats about one corporation incorporated to make money. And this is exactly about buttom-line, money. With every major iOS release there is large number of complaints regarding perceived drop in performance. Nothing new. You run some benchmark, numbers are the same so this must be related to new features u allready knew. You are assured that internal engine, cpu, gpu etc are working as allways. And again and again till 10.2.1 and 11.2. 

    Now, you are trying to look like you know everything, every user, every device. Even, you can’t admit what apple himself allready admited. So sad...
  • Reply 156 of 178
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 4,561member
    feudalist said:

    I love how uninformed and technically simple-minded folk such as yourself cling to benchmark results as gospel for explaining your uninformed conclusions...

    What is the definition of a performance benchmark?

    It means what a certain piece of technology can achieve performance wise when pushed to it's limit.
    ...

    You are deflecting, attacking and insulting other people. Why?

    This throtling issue is confirmed by Apple, so there is no need to invoke unrelated performance problems.

    Sure there is, because plenty of people are conflating any perceived performance issue with the peak power draw throttling, despite not knowing if its this or that. People are complaining about general slowness only since upgrading to iOS 11, of their camera app taking 10 seconds to load, etc...which isn’t peak power draw throttling and a sign of their confusion. 

    Thats is not an insult nor an attack. You’re being defensive. Why?

    While I agree that it is NOT a peak power draw throttling issue, it is STILL AN ISSUE that the user is experiencing, isn't it??? After installing a software update literally forced upon by Apple, the user has an issue with the performance of the device and the user needs a solution. At the end of the day, your solution is - go to an Apple store to find out the root cause of the problem. That is good in theory. Just because Apple store is nearer to your house/office OR you have enough time to go to an Apple store even if it is far away DOES NOT mean that everyone else has the same luxury. The end-user has to waste time for a problem created by a company and all I hear from you is - the user is to blame here, not the company which literally forces it on the end-user OR does not allow the user to go back to previous stable version.

    Why can't you think from user perspective, in terms of what they are going through and see why they complain? Why do you feel the necessity to think only from Apple's perspective and defend them at ANY cost? Why can't you empathize with the people who face a problem? Are you saying there is NO problem at all EVER AND it is all false accusations and imaginations? In my own experience - Given a choice, I would go all the way back to iOS 7 in my first generation iPad Air - it was near flawless, performance and usability wise. It is crawling with iOS 10 now. There is a REAL problem with software updates shoveled on the throat by Apple.

    Actually you just made all that up, and I said no such thing. I'm neither blaming the user nor suggesting a solution for their problems. I was specifically replying to feudalist's claim that magman1979 was deflecting, attacking, and insulting people. I did so by pointing out how people are conflating any perceived performance issue with the peak power draw issue. 

    You just added a bunch of rhetoric that simply didn't exist in my post. In other words, a straw man. Thwack thwack!! Take that, straw man!
    edited January 8 magman1979
  • Reply 157 of 178
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 2,556administrator
    airnerd said:
    Lost in all this batterygate garbage, and it is garbage, is if my iPhone 6 which I (stupidly I know, I know) had a 3rd party battery installed in is eligible for the $29 battery.  The warranty should be void, and I knew that when I did it.  So can I still get it done or am I SOL? 
    Depends. If the case is bent by even a little, then you're out of luck.
    airnerd
  • Reply 158 of 178
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 4,561member

    feudalist said:
    feudalist said:

    I love how uninformed and technically simple-minded folk such as yourself cling to benchmark results as gospel for explaining your uninformed conclusions...

    What is the definition of a performance benchmark?

    It means what a certain piece of technology can achieve performance wise when pushed to it's limit.
    ...

    You are deflecting, attacking and insulting other people. Why?

    This throtling issue is confirmed by Apple, so there is no need to invoke unrelated performance problems.

    Sure there is, because plenty of people are conflating any perceived performance issue with the peak power draw throttling, despite not knowing if its this or that. People are complaining about general slowness only since upgrading to iOS 11, of their camera app taking 10 seconds to load, etc...which isn’t peak power draw throttling and a sign of their confusion. 

    Thats is not an insult nor an attack. You’re being defensive. Why?
    This conversation is about lawsuit regarding confirmed throtling. I dont know exact number of affected units, only Apple knows that. So calling names, deflecting etc is new decent, kind and inteligent conversation? Thats about one corporation incorporated to make money. And this is exactly about buttom-line, money. With every major iOS release there is large number of complaints regarding perceived drop in performance. Nothing new. You run some benchmark, numbers are the same so this must be related to new features u allready knew. You are assured that internal engine, cpu, gpu etc are working as allways. And again and again till 10.2.1 and 11.2. 

    Now, you are trying to look like you know everything, every user, every device. Even, you can’t admit what apple himself allready admited. So sad...
    I have no idea what you're trying to say. 

    To help clear up the mush -- we know peak performance draw throttling was introduced in 10.2.1, and we know certain criteria must be met for it to happen. But we also know that doesn't mean all performance complaints from all people are a result of it. As an example, Atomic himself said his phone was "speedy" pre-iOS 11, which makes it unlikely that his problem is peak performance draw throttling, as the feature was introduced in 10.2.1 and not in 11.

    So again, people pointing this out are not attacking you. You're just being defensive.
    edited January 8 magman1979
  • Reply 159 of 178
    mr. hmr. h Posts: 4,688member
    I have no idea what you're trying to say. 

    To help clear up the mush -- we know peak performance draw throttling was introduced in 10.2.1, and we know certain criteria must be met for it to happen. But we also know that doesn't mean all performance complaints from all people are a result of it. As an example, Atomic himself said his phone was "speedy" pre-iOS 11, which makes it unlikely that his problem is peak performance draw throttling, as the feature was introduced in 10.2.1 and not in 11.
    Yes, but we do have to consider the possibility that the feature has been modified in iOS 11. It's possible that as the team that was working on this code for iPhone 7 (with its more complex CPU with high-power and low-power cores), they also made further alterations/tweaks to how it works on pre-iPhone 7 phones.
  • Reply 160 of 178

    feudalist said:
    feudalist said:

    I love how uninformed and technically simple-minded folk such as yourself cling to benchmark results as gospel for explaining your uninformed conclusions...

    What is the definition of a performance benchmark?

    It means what a certain piece of technology can achieve performance wise when pushed to it's limit.
    ...

    You are deflecting, attacking and insulting other people. Why?

    This throtling issue is confirmed by Apple, so there is no need to invoke unrelated performance problems.

    Sure there is, because plenty of people are conflating any perceived performance issue with the peak power draw throttling, despite not knowing if its this or that. People are complaining about general slowness only since upgrading to iOS 11, of their camera app taking 10 seconds to load, etc...which isn’t peak power draw throttling and a sign of their confusion. 

    Thats is not an insult nor an attack. You’re being defensive. Why?
    This conversation is about lawsuit regarding confirmed throtling. I dont know exact number of affected units, only Apple knows that. So calling names, deflecting etc is new decent, kind and inteligent conversation? Thats about one corporation incorporated to make money. And this is exactly about buttom-line, money. With every major iOS release there is large number of complaints regarding perceived drop in performance. Nothing new. You run some benchmark, numbers are the same so this must be related to new features u allready knew. You are assured that internal engine, cpu, gpu etc are working as allways. And again and again till 10.2.1 and 11.2. 

    Now, you are trying to look like you know everything, every user, every device. Even, you can’t admit what apple himself allready admited. So sad...

    To help clear up the mush -- we know peak performance draw throttling was introduced in 10.2.1, and we know certain criteria must be met for it to happen. But we also know that doesn't mean all performance complaints from all people are a result of it. As an example, Atomic himself said his phone was "speedy" pre-iOS 11, which makes it unlikely that his problem is peak performance draw throttling, as the feature was introduced in 10.2.1 and not in 11.
    Ok. You have some valid points, but last one is based on flawed assumption that apple did nothing to this “feature” betwen 10.2.1 and 11.2. That’s unreasonable and unproven expectation on your side, atomic’s observation is just that... observation. 
    atomic101
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