Video: iPhone X vs OnePlus 6 - Benchmarks

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  • Reply 41 of 101
    At the first sentence I wondered if this testing was originally done with the base OnePlus model and upon discovering that model didn’t turn out well in comparison to the base iPhone X model the upgraded model was used and written about. Apple Insider, please confirm or deny my curiosity. If confirmed, please explain why you chose to portray the OnePlus in a better light and iPhone in a less flattering light. 

    Edit: At the first sentence of the second paragraph, I wondered... ߘ馬t;br>
    You make no sense. Why would you NOT use the top of the line version to match up with Apples top of the line?! OF COURSE you would use the best of both. 
    Of course my comment had to receive an idiotic  response from a newbie instead of detailed explanation from Apple Insider.

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 42 of 101
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 6,561administrator
    At the first sentence I wondered if this testing was originally done with the base OnePlus model and upon discovering that model didn’t turn out well in comparison to the base iPhone X model the upgraded model was used and written about. Apple Insider, please confirm or deny my curiosity. If confirmed, please explain why you chose to portray the OnePlus in a better light and iPhone in a less flattering light. 

    Edit: At the first sentence of the second paragraph, I wondered... 😉
    We never tried the lower-end model.

    We are under no obligation to be flattering to an Apple product. The benchmarks are pretty clear.
    muthuk_vanalingampentae
  • Reply 43 of 101
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    Does it run iOS?
    Does it have Apple's security embedded and constantly updated?
    Does the company sell the data they collect from my phone?
    Does it automatically back up my files and configurations?
    Does it automatically share my photos with my other devices?
    Does it provide FaceTime so I can talk to my grandson?
    Can I take it the my Apple Store if I have a question or problem?
    Does it work with my Apple Watch?
    Does it track my health and fitness parameters?
    Does it....

    No?   Then what good is it?

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 44 of 101
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 6,498member
    Does it run iOS?
    Does it have Apple's security embedded and constantly updated?
    Does the company sell the data they collect from my phone?
    Does it automatically back up my files and configurations?
    Does it automatically share my photos with my other devices?
    Does it provide FaceTime so I can talk to my grandson?
    Can I take it the my Apple Store if I have a question or problem?
    Does it work with my Apple Watch?
    Does it track my health and fitness parameters?
    Does it....

    No?   Then what good is it?

    It's 'good' for not getting you tied into the Apple ecosystem. It is clearly an alternative. Anyone even remotely interested in this phone wouldn't expect to make FT calls and have it connect with an Apple Watch.

    That would be the whole point of even considering an Android phone.

    The temptation is bang for buck and if you are willing to not be tied into the iOS ecosystem and simply use it as another device.

    I do exactly that and have zero issues using both Android and iOS. In fact I have a long list of iOS/macOS specific features simply not working.

    My current pet peeve which I utterly detest is the update nag to iOS.

    You are told an update is available.

    You tell your phone 'not now' and it pops up the passcode screen for you to imput your code. At the bottom of that screen and in low contrast text you are told that the update will take place in the early hours of the morning if a WiFi connection is present.

    If I said 'not now' it's because the only other option was to update. 

    It is totally underhand that Apple then tries to 'stealth update' the phone via the passcode screen (which many will simply input to continue using the phone and get rid of the screen).

    AirDrop has worked exactly twice for me since it was released. Airplay has worked well enough but still has dropouts. iOS is severely lacking in configuration options and is a frustrating experience when going from Android. Options don't mean complexity. That's why many systems have advanced options. They are there if you need them but don't get in the way if you don't.

    If you're happy being tied to Apple, that's fine but if want to have the best of both worlds, a good Android phone or Windows laptop might be worth giving a try.
    muthuk_vanalingampentae
  • Reply 45 of 101
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,506member
    adm1 said:
    Was there a OnePlus 3, 4 & 5? I must've missed those. :lol:
    There was OnePlus 3, 3T, 5 and 5T which were pretty good for their times.
    And there's a common reason there was no model number 4.
  • Reply 46 of 101
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,506member
    AI Team, can you please review the Google Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL phones? The reason why I am asking - They are the ones with the best software quality (no bloatware, smooth performance) in Android world unlike the Samsung phones which come with a huge amount of bloatware AND poor software optimization.
    It's fairly easy to find "experience" comparisons between the pure Google Pixels and latest iPhones. In essence there's pretty wide agreement that they've reached the point they are equally as smooth, fully-featured, reliable, and secure, and that's coming from even some decade-long iPhone users who have had the recent opportunity to use both.

    Search "iPhone user reviews Pixel 2". At least these guys comment about it after actually having extended real-world use of both. There's a reason you'll never see me comment about how well iPhone's work. Sure I've used one for a few minutes here and there, the X included, but that hardly qualifies me to judge them unlike other Apple products I have or had owned.  (The only one I wouldn't bother with again would be the Apple TV but that's just me. Well maybe not just me...)

    FWIW I quite recently bought a used Pixel, the original 2106 model and not an XL either, as a burner phone. Really Blue. Price was right and needed one for a work account. Even as a longtime Android smartphone owner I'm shocked at how responsive it is for a two year old phone, and how well the hardware and software is married. It's caused me to at least reconsider my stated refusal to even consider a Pixel 2 which in the case of the 2XL is still too-high priced IMHO. 

    My other very surprising takeaway? I might actually prefer a smaller phone. With all the +5" smartphones I've used in recent years I had lost track of how convenient a smaller phone can be in hand and in use. That may well be a major point the next time I but a new phone. If I do. 

    Anyway, apologies for the slight detour. The thread is about the OnePlus and not Pixels. Like other posters in the thread I'm no big fan of specs as a predictor of satisfactory experience anyway. I loved my Axon 7. Until I didn't. But specs still have value in the purchasing process so I can appreciate what the AI article is trying to accomplish at least in part. 
    edited May 2018 pentae
  • Reply 47 of 101
    ericthehalfbeeericthehalfbee Posts: 4,398member
    avon b7 said:
    Does it run iOS?
    Does it have Apple's security embedded and constantly updated?
    Does the company sell the data they collect from my phone?
    Does it automatically back up my files and configurations?
    Does it automatically share my photos with my other devices?
    Does it provide FaceTime so I can talk to my grandson?
    Can I take it the my Apple Store if I have a question or problem?
    Does it work with my Apple Watch?
    Does it track my health and fitness parameters?
    Does it....

    No?   Then what good is it?

    It's 'good' for not getting you tied into the Apple ecosystem. It is clearly an alternative. Anyone even remotely interested in this phone wouldn't expect to make FT calls and have it connect with an Apple Watch.

    That would be the whole point of even considering an Android phone.

    The temptation is bang for buck and if you are willing to not be tied into the iOS ecosystem and simply use it as another device.

    I do exactly that and have zero issues using both Android and iOS. In fact I have a long list of iOS/macOS specific features simply not working.

    My current pet peeve which I utterly detest is the update nag to iOS.

    You are told an update is available.

    You tell your phone 'not now' and it pops up the passcode screen for you to imput your code. At the bottom of that screen and in low contrast text you are told that the update will take place in the early hours of the morning if a WiFi connection is present.

    If I said 'not now' it's because the only other option was to update. 

    It is totally underhand that Apple then tries to 'stealth update' the phone via the passcode screen (which many will simply input to continue using the phone and get rid of the screen).

    AirDrop has worked exactly twice for me since it was released. Airplay has worked well enough but still has dropouts. iOS is severely lacking in configuration options and is a frustrating experience when going from Android. Options don't mean complexity. That's why many systems have advanced options. They are there if you need them but don't get in the way if you don't.

    If you're happy being tied to Apple, that's fine but if want to have the best of both worlds, a good Android phone or Windows laptop might be worth giving a try.


    Keep up the fight, troll.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 48 of 101
    gatorguy said:
    AI Team, can you please review the Google Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL phones? The reason why I am asking - They are the ones with the best software quality (no bloatware, smooth performance) in Android world unlike the Samsung phones which come with a huge amount of bloatware AND poor software optimization.
    It's fairly easy to find "experience" comparisons between the pure Google Pixels and latest iPhones. In essence there's pretty wide agreement that they've reached the point they are equally as smooth, fully-featured, reliable, and secure, and that's coming from even some decade-long iPhone users who have had the recent opportunity to use both.
    I know that already. But then, we would be labeled as Trolls for stating that fact. If AI reviewers compare them objectively and make a review, it would be an eye-opener for at least some of the members in this forum.
    gatorguy
  • Reply 49 of 101
    avon b7 said:
    Does it run iOS?
    Does it have Apple's security embedded and constantly updated?
    Does the company sell the data they collect from my phone?
    Does it automatically back up my files and configurations?
    Does it automatically share my photos with my other devices?
    Does it provide FaceTime so I can talk to my grandson?
    Can I take it the my Apple Store if I have a question or problem?
    Does it work with my Apple Watch?
    Does it track my health and fitness parameters?
    Does it....

    No?   Then what good is it?

    It's 'good' for not getting you tied into the Apple ecosystem. It is clearly an alternative. Anyone even remotely interested in this phone wouldn't expect to make FT calls and have it connect with an Apple Watch.

    That would be the whole point of even considering an Android phone.

    The temptation is bang for buck and if you are willing to not be tied into the iOS ecosystem and simply use it as another device.

    I do exactly that and have zero issues using both Android and iOS. In fact I have a long list of iOS/macOS specific features simply not working.

    My current pet peeve which I utterly detest is the update nag to iOS.

    You are told an update is available.

    You tell your phone 'not now' and it pops up the passcode screen for you to imput your code. At the bottom of that screen and in low contrast text you are told that the update will take place in the early hours of the morning if a WiFi connection is present.

    If I said 'not now' it's because the only other option was to update. 

    It is totally underhand that Apple then tries to 'stealth update' the phone via the passcode screen (which many will simply input to continue using the phone and get rid of the screen).

    AirDrop has worked exactly twice for me since it was released. Airplay has worked well enough but still has dropouts. iOS is severely lacking in configuration options and is a frustrating experience when going from Android. Options don't mean complexity. That's why many systems have advanced options. They are there if you need them but don't get in the way if you don't.

    If you're happy being tied to Apple, that's fine but if want to have the best of both worlds, a good Android phone or Windows laptop might be worth giving a try.


    Keep up the fight, troll.

    So, you don't have ANYTHING else to say, except name calling?
    Soligatorguynapoleon_phoneapartpentae
  • Reply 50 of 101
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 6,498member
    avon b7 said:
    Does it run iOS?
    Does it have Apple's security embedded and constantly updated?
    Does the company sell the data they collect from my phone?
    Does it automatically back up my files and configurations?
    Does it automatically share my photos with my other devices?
    Does it provide FaceTime so I can talk to my grandson?
    Can I take it the my Apple Store if I have a question or problem?
    Does it work with my Apple Watch?
    Does it track my health and fitness parameters?
    Does it....

    No?   Then what good is it?

    It's 'good' for not getting you tied into the Apple ecosystem. It is clearly an alternative. Anyone even remotely interested in this phone wouldn't expect to make FT calls and have it connect with an Apple Watch.

    That would be the whole point of even considering an Android phone.

    The temptation is bang for buck and if you are willing to not be tied into the iOS ecosystem and simply use it as another device.

    I do exactly that and have zero issues using both Android and iOS. In fact I have a long list of iOS/macOS specific features simply not working.

    My current pet peeve which I utterly detest is the update nag to iOS.

    You are told an update is available.

    You tell your phone 'not now' and it pops up the passcode screen for you to imput your code. At the bottom of that screen and in low contrast text you are told that the update will take place in the early hours of the morning if a WiFi connection is present.

    If I said 'not now' it's because the only other option was to update. 

    It is totally underhand that Apple then tries to 'stealth update' the phone via the passcode screen (which many will simply input to continue using the phone and get rid of the screen).

    AirDrop has worked exactly twice for me since it was released. Airplay has worked well enough but still has dropouts. iOS is severely lacking in configuration options and is a frustrating experience when going from Android. Options don't mean complexity. That's why many systems have advanced options. They are there if you need them but don't get in the way if you don't.

    If you're happy being tied to Apple, that's fine but if want to have the best of both worlds, a good Android phone or Windows laptop might be worth giving a try.


    Keep up the fight, troll.
    Your comment would have more weight if you actually countered with something better than labelling people.

    One of the reasons iPhone sales have been largely flat for the last few years is precisely because of phones like the one in this piece.

    Bang for buck is important for people even if it doesn't lead to Apple's pockets getting even deeper than they already are.

    It's also one of the reasons Apple has opened its model spread so wide and, by some accounts, the iPhone 6 series and SE are selling so well (given their age).

    Apple wants Android users to switch but to what? Two or three year old non full screen hardware? Or this year's (2017/18) phones? A what price point?

    The OnePlus 6 and Honor 10 and Xiaomi phones are attractive alternatives (both on design, specs and latest Android) to those users and even some iPhone users. I know three people who will be switching to Android this year.


    muthuk_vanalingamgatorguynapoleon_phoneapartpentae
  • Reply 51 of 101
    gatorguy said:
    Anyway, apologies for the slight detour. The thread is about the OnePlus and not Pixels. Like other posters in the thread I'm no big fan of specs as a predictor of satisfactory experience anyway. I loved my Axon 7. Until I didn't. But specs still have value in the purchasing process so I can appreciate what the AI article is trying to accomplish at least in part. 
    I was the one who derailed this thread from OnePlus to Pixels and I have explained my reasons as well already. Trust is a big issue when it comes to OnePlus. There are few issues with OnePlus which were reported in almost all android sites. @AppleMagic shared some of those links and I added one more. AI seem to have plans to do a deep dive on One Plus 6 like they did with Samsung Galaxy S9. My request to AI was to reconsider that and review a Pixel phone instead. While Pixel phones are overpriced, you can still get few good deals from time to time at a right price.
  • Reply 52 of 101
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 6,561administrator
    gatorguy said:
    Anyway, apologies for the slight detour. The thread is about the OnePlus and not Pixels. Like other posters in the thread I'm no big fan of specs as a predictor of satisfactory experience anyway. I loved my Axon 7. Until I didn't. But specs still have value in the purchasing process so I can appreciate what the AI article is trying to accomplish at least in part. 
    I was the one who derailed this thread from OnePlus to Pixels and I have explained my reasons as well already. Trust is a big issue when it comes to OnePlus. There are few issues with OnePlus which were reported in almost all android sites. @AppleMagic shared some of those links and I added one more. AI seem to have plans to do a deep dive on One Plus 6 like they did with Samsung Galaxy S9. My request to AI was to reconsider that and review a Pixel phone instead. While Pixel phones are overpriced, you can still get few good deals from time to time at a right price.
    I've passed your request to the Video team.
  • Reply 53 of 101
    gatorguy said:
    Anyway, apologies for the slight detour. The thread is about the OnePlus and not Pixels. Like other posters in the thread I'm no big fan of specs as a predictor of satisfactory experience anyway. I loved my Axon 7. Until I didn't. But specs still have value in the purchasing process so I can appreciate what the AI article is trying to accomplish at least in part. 
    I was the one who derailed this thread from OnePlus to Pixels and I have explained my reasons as well already. Trust is a big issue when it comes to OnePlus. There are few issues with OnePlus which were reported in almost all android sites. @AppleMagic shared some of those links and I added one more. AI seem to have plans to do a deep dive on One Plus 6 like they did with Samsung Galaxy S9. My request to AI was to reconsider that and review a Pixel phone instead. While Pixel phones are overpriced, you can still get few good deals from time to time at a right price.
    I've passed your request to the Video team.

    Thanks a lot Mike.
  • Reply 54 of 101
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 3,060member
    Even if the OnePlus trounced the iPhone, I value my privacy too much to consider switching for a few hundred dollars savings. With Google, you are not the customer; you are the product being sold to advertisers.  Contrary to what Google investors would like you to think, there is a real choice to be made concerning privacy between Apple and Alphabet.
    edited May 2018 watto_cobra
  • Reply 55 of 101
    KITAKITA Posts: 382member
    muthuk_vanalingam said:

     While Pixel phones are overpriced, you can still get few good deals from time to time at a right price.
    I've never seen them as overpriced. The entry Pixel 2 is $50 less than the entry iPhone 8, yet it has a higher resolution AMOLED display, a better front and rear camera, front facing stereo speakers, much better sustained graphics performance and a seriously powerful secondary processor for machine learning and image processing.
  • Reply 56 of 101
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,506member
    KITA said:
    muthuk_vanalingam said:

     While Pixel phones are overpriced, you can still get few good deals from time to time at a right price.
    I've never seen them as overpriced. The entry Pixel 2 is $50 less than the entry iPhone 8, yet it has a higher resolution AMOLED display, a better front and rear camera, front facing stereo speakers, much better sustained graphics performance and a seriously powerful secondary processor for machine learning and image processing.
    None of which would necessarily be the deciding points if the "experience" wasn't clean and fluid. Based simply on my personal use of the generation older Pixel I'm pretty impressed and would expect the Pixel 2 to be even better. 
  • Reply 57 of 101
    KITA said:
    muthuk_vanalingam said:

     While Pixel phones are overpriced, you can still get few good deals from time to time at a right price.
    I've never seen them as overpriced. The entry Pixel 2 is $50 less than the entry iPhone 8, yet it has a higher resolution AMOLED display, a better front and rear camera, front facing stereo speakers, much better sustained graphics performance and a seriously powerful secondary processor for machine learning and image processing.
    Well, they do have issues for such a high price quoted. Display is one of the most important aspects of a smartphone and Pixel phones lack in this compared to Samsung phones or iPhones (even the LCD varieties, no higher resolution alone does NOT make a good display). Design is another aspect, the less said the better. Considering those points, I still think they are overpriced. We can agree to disagree though.
  • Reply 58 of 101
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,506member
    KITA said:
    muthuk_vanalingam said:

     While Pixel phones are overpriced, you can still get few good deals from time to time at a right price.
    I've never seen them as overpriced. The entry Pixel 2 is $50 less than the entry iPhone 8, yet it has a higher resolution AMOLED display, a better front and rear camera, front facing stereo speakers, much better sustained graphics performance and a seriously powerful secondary processor for machine learning and image processing.
    Well, they do have issues for such a high price quoted. Display is one of the most important aspects of a smartphone and Pixel phones lack in this compared to Samsung phones or iPhones (even the LCD varieties, no higher resolution alone does NOT make a good display). Design is another aspect, the less said the better. Considering those points, I still think they are overpriced. We can agree to disagree though.
    Based on what I was reading a couple days back build dates after January of this year don't have the same display issues as those very early ones. Even those very early builds were apparently inconsistent with some people reporting display problems and other people saying it was great. With better attention to display quality and combined with software updates  with improved color profiles the display's pretty much become a non-issue now. But IMO shouldn't have been a problem to begin with.
  • Reply 59 of 101
    KITAKITA Posts: 382member
    KITA said:
    muthuk_vanalingam said:

     While Pixel phones are overpriced, you can still get few good deals from time to time at a right price.
    I've never seen them as overpriced. The entry Pixel 2 is $50 less than the entry iPhone 8, yet it has a higher resolution AMOLED display, a better front and rear camera, front facing stereo speakers, much better sustained graphics performance and a seriously powerful secondary processor for machine learning and image processing.
    Well, they do have issues for such a high price quoted. Display is one of the most important aspects of a smartphone and Pixel phones lack in this compared to Samsung phones or iPhones (even the LCD varieties, no higher resolution alone does NOT make a good display). Design is another aspect, the less said the better. Considering those points, I still think they are overpriced. We can agree to disagree though.
    Issues with the display had been mostly in early devices, a lot of which was fixed with software. Resolution alone doesn't, but this AMOLED display is certainly better than the LCD iPhone 8.

    The interesting thing is, Google said very little when they launched the Pixel 2. They never even once mentioned the Pixel Visual Core, most of it was focusing on the user experience, such as the portrait mode, offline music recognition, always on display, Google Assistant integration, etc. It gets the fastest updates and excellent support (2 year warranty).

    At first glance, it's easily the most unassuming flagship phone.
  • Reply 60 of 101
    tipootipoo Posts: 1,120member
    Something has been on my mind lately that maybe you could answer with both of these devices Max. iOS dipped in its lead on UI framerate consistancy ever since 7 where things went transparent-on-transparent, and 11 got particularly frame drop prone. 

    With a high end Android device like the Oneplus 6, which one is ahead on UI framerate consistency now? Is iPhone still the imperfect best, or did that lead get lost? 
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