Video: iPhone X vs OnePlus 6 - Benchmarks

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Comments

  • Reply 61 of 101
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,033member
    tipoo said:
    Something has been on my mind lately that maybe you could answer with both of these devices Max. iOS dipped in its lead on UI framerate consistancy ever since 7 where things went transparent-on-transparent, and 11 got particularly frame drop prone. 

    With a high end Android device like the Oneplus 6, which one is ahead on UI framerate consistency now? Is iPhone still the imperfect best, or did that lead get lost? 
    I recall that being an issue after iOS 7 debuted, but I thought that was resolved a couple years ago. I haven't re-read this article, but I think this is the page on AnandTech that discusses that change with iOS 10.

  • Reply 62 of 101
    ericthehalfbeeericthehalfbee Posts: 4,398member
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    Does it run iOS?
    Does it have Apple's security embedded and constantly updated?
    Does the company sell the data they collect from my phone?
    Does it automatically back up my files and configurations?
    Does it automatically share my photos with my other devices?
    Does it provide FaceTime so I can talk to my grandson?
    Can I take it the my Apple Store if I have a question or problem?
    Does it work with my Apple Watch?
    Does it track my health and fitness parameters?
    Does it....

    No?   Then what good is it?

    It's 'good' for not getting you tied into the Apple ecosystem. It is clearly an alternative. Anyone even remotely interested in this phone wouldn't expect to make FT calls and have it connect with an Apple Watch.

    That would be the whole point of even considering an Android phone.

    The temptation is bang for buck and if you are willing to not be tied into the iOS ecosystem and simply use it as another device.

    I do exactly that and have zero issues using both Android and iOS. In fact I have a long list of iOS/macOS specific features simply not working.

    My current pet peeve which I utterly detest is the update nag to iOS.

    You are told an update is available.

    You tell your phone 'not now' and it pops up the passcode screen for you to imput your code. At the bottom of that screen and in low contrast text you are told that the update will take place in the early hours of the morning if a WiFi connection is present.

    If I said 'not now' it's because the only other option was to update. 

    It is totally underhand that Apple then tries to 'stealth update' the phone via the passcode screen (which many will simply input to continue using the phone and get rid of the screen).

    AirDrop has worked exactly twice for me since it was released. Airplay has worked well enough but still has dropouts. iOS is severely lacking in configuration options and is a frustrating experience when going from Android. Options don't mean complexity. That's why many systems have advanced options. They are there if you need them but don't get in the way if you don't.

    If you're happy being tied to Apple, that's fine but if want to have the best of both worlds, a good Android phone or Windows laptop might be worth giving a try.


    Keep up the fight, troll.
    Your comment would have more weight if you actually countered with something better than labelling people.

    One of the reasons iPhone sales have been largely flat for the last few years is precisely because of phones like the one in this piece.

    Bang for buck is important for people even if it doesn't lead to Apple's pockets getting even deeper than they already are.

    It's also one of the reasons Apple has opened its model spread so wide and, by some accounts, the iPhone 6 series and SE are selling so well (given their age).

    Apple wants Android users to switch but to what? Two or three year old non full screen hardware? Or this year's (2017/18) phones? A what price point?

    The OnePlus 6 and Honor 10 and Xiaomi phones are attractive alternatives (both on design, specs and latest Android) to those users and even some iPhone users. I know three people who will be switching to Android this year.



    Please. Anyone who's read your posts (frequently full of lies and BS) knows exactly why you're here and what you are (a troll). There's really no point discussing anything with a troll as you always end up running around in circles as you constantly try and shift the narrative. And when you get called on it you play the victim.
    edited May 2018 watto_cobra
  • Reply 63 of 101
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 6,498member
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    Does it run iOS?
    Does it have Apple's security embedded and constantly updated?
    Does the company sell the data they collect from my phone?
    Does it automatically back up my files and configurations?
    Does it automatically share my photos with my other devices?
    Does it provide FaceTime so I can talk to my grandson?
    Can I take it the my Apple Store if I have a question or problem?
    Does it work with my Apple Watch?
    Does it track my health and fitness parameters?
    Does it....

    No?   Then what good is it?

    It's 'good' for not getting you tied into the Apple ecosystem. It is clearly an alternative. Anyone even remotely interested in this phone wouldn't expect to make FT calls and have it connect with an Apple Watch.

    That would be the whole point of even considering an Android phone.

    The temptation is bang for buck and if you are willing to not be tied into the iOS ecosystem and simply use it as another device.

    I do exactly that and have zero issues using both Android and iOS. In fact I have a long list of iOS/macOS specific features simply not working.

    My current pet peeve which I utterly detest is the update nag to iOS.

    You are told an update is available.

    You tell your phone 'not now' and it pops up the passcode screen for you to imput your code. At the bottom of that screen and in low contrast text you are told that the update will take place in the early hours of the morning if a WiFi connection is present.

    If I said 'not now' it's because the only other option was to update. 

    It is totally underhand that Apple then tries to 'stealth update' the phone via the passcode screen (which many will simply input to continue using the phone and get rid of the screen).

    AirDrop has worked exactly twice for me since it was released. Airplay has worked well enough but still has dropouts. iOS is severely lacking in configuration options and is a frustrating experience when going from Android. Options don't mean complexity. That's why many systems have advanced options. They are there if you need them but don't get in the way if you don't.

    If you're happy being tied to Apple, that's fine but if want to have the best of both worlds, a good Android phone or Windows laptop might be worth giving a try.


    Keep up the fight, troll.
    Your comment would have more weight if you actually countered with something better than labelling people.

    One of the reasons iPhone sales have been largely flat for the last few years is precisely because of phones like the one in this piece.

    Bang for buck is important for people even if it doesn't lead to Apple's pockets getting even deeper than they already are.

    It's also one of the reasons Apple has opened its model spread so wide and, by some accounts, the iPhone 6 series and SE are selling so well (given their age).

    Apple wants Android users to switch but to what? Two or three year old non full screen hardware? Or this year's (2017/18) phones? A what price point?

    The OnePlus 6 and Honor 10 and Xiaomi phones are attractive alternatives (both on design, specs and latest Android) to those users and even some iPhone users. I know three people who will be switching to Android this year.



    Please. Anyone who's read your posts (frequently full of lies and BS) knows exactly why you're here and what you are (a troll). There's really no point discussing anything with a troll as you always end up running around in circles as you constantly try and shift the narrative. And when you get called on it you play the victim.
    There's no point labelling people either then, is there?

    Lies? That would be easy to demonstrate. Go ahead and try.

    I have no 'narrative' to shift. You only have to pay attention but if you jump in head first you can expect a bump on the head every now and then because the water might not be as deep as you think.

    This is a middle of the road Android phone punching above its weight. In a commoditised smartphone market you should be able to see its attraction in the mid to high end. Bang for buck with extras. Not only that but as time goes by (quickly) it will get discounted and see special promotions. Want to avoid the low end but can't afford the high end? Consider this phone 

    There are some valid points raised in this thread but few of them will be showstoppers to current Android users and much less EU Android users.

    Competition is good. Next up is the Lenovo Z5. Choice is good, too.


  • Reply 64 of 101
    tmaytmay Posts: 5,824member
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    Does it run iOS?
    Does it have Apple's security embedded and constantly updated?
    Does the company sell the data they collect from my phone?
    Does it automatically back up my files and configurations?
    Does it automatically share my photos with my other devices?
    Does it provide FaceTime so I can talk to my grandson?
    Can I take it the my Apple Store if I have a question or problem?
    Does it work with my Apple Watch?
    Does it track my health and fitness parameters?
    Does it....

    No?   Then what good is it?

    It's 'good' for not getting you tied into the Apple ecosystem. It is clearly an alternative. Anyone even remotely interested in this phone wouldn't expect to make FT calls and have it connect with an Apple Watch.

    That would be the whole point of even considering an Android phone.

    The temptation is bang for buck and if you are willing to not be tied into the iOS ecosystem and simply use it as another device.

    I do exactly that and have zero issues using both Android and iOS. In fact I have a long list of iOS/macOS specific features simply not working.

    My current pet peeve which I utterly detest is the update nag to iOS.

    You are told an update is available.

    You tell your phone 'not now' and it pops up the passcode screen for you to imput your code. At the bottom of that screen and in low contrast text you are told that the update will take place in the early hours of the morning if a WiFi connection is present.

    If I said 'not now' it's because the only other option was to update. 

    It is totally underhand that Apple then tries to 'stealth update' the phone via the passcode screen (which many will simply input to continue using the phone and get rid of the screen).

    AirDrop has worked exactly twice for me since it was released. Airplay has worked well enough but still has dropouts. iOS is severely lacking in configuration options and is a frustrating experience when going from Android. Options don't mean complexity. That's why many systems have advanced options. They are there if you need them but don't get in the way if you don't.

    If you're happy being tied to Apple, that's fine but if want to have the best of both worlds, a good Android phone or Windows laptop might be worth giving a try.


    Keep up the fight, troll.
    Your comment would have more weight if you actually countered with something better than labelling people.

    One of the reasons iPhone sales have been largely flat for the last few years is precisely because of phones like the one in this piece.

    Bang for buck is important for people even if it doesn't lead to Apple's pockets getting even deeper than they already are.

    It's also one of the reasons Apple has opened its model spread so wide and, by some accounts, the iPhone 6 series and SE are selling so well (given their age).

    Apple wants Android users to switch but to what? Two or three year old non full screen hardware? Or this year's (2017/18) phones? A what price point?

    The OnePlus 6 and Honor 10 and Xiaomi phones are attractive alternatives (both on design, specs and latest Android) to those users and even some iPhone users. I know three people who will be switching to Android this year.



    Please. Anyone who's read your posts (frequently full of lies and BS) knows exactly why you're here and what you are (a troll). There's really no point discussing anything with a troll as you always end up running around in circles as you constantly try and shift the narrative. And when you get called on it you play the victim.
    I'd love to help, but it's a holiday, and I've already wasted enough time on the "essential" thread with the Andy Rubin hagiography.

    (Seriously, the Google Pixel sold 25x more units in a year than the Essential Phone, and frankly, is the iPhone of Android OS devices per Vlad of the Verge.

    EDIT;

    His narrative, btw, is all about marketshare. He does not recognize ASP as a metric in line with his arguments. 

    He is, as well, unable to understand that the iPhone is, for the most part, a separate market, anecdotes about "switchers" not withstanding, and can't imagine that other Android OS device makers might be fighting over the same low ASP turf. 

    He uses, on occasion, iOS on his wife's iPhone 6, so no, not really an iOS user. 
    edited May 2018 watto_cobra
  • Reply 65 of 101
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    avon b7 said:
    Does it run iOS?
    Does it have Apple's security embedded and constantly updated?
    Does the company sell the data they collect from my phone?
    Does it automatically back up my files and configurations?
    Does it automatically share my photos with my other devices?
    Does it provide FaceTime so I can talk to my grandson?
    Can I take it the my Apple Store if I have a question or problem?
    Does it work with my Apple Watch?
    Does it track my health and fitness parameters?
    Does it....

    No?   Then what good is it?

    It's 'good' for not getting you tied into the Apple ecosystem. It is clearly an alternative. Anyone even remotely interested in this phone wouldn't expect to make FT calls and have it connect with an Apple Watch.

    That would be the whole point of even considering an Android phone.

    The temptation is bang for buck and if you are willing to not be tied into the iOS ecosystem and simply use it as another device.

    I do exactly that and have zero issues using both Android and iOS. In fact I have a long list of iOS/macOS specific features simply not working.

    My current pet peeve which I utterly detest is the update nag to iOS.

    You are told an update is available.

    You tell your phone 'not now' and it pops up the passcode screen for you to imput your code. At the bottom of that screen and in low contrast text you are told that the update will take place in the early hours of the morning if a WiFi connection is present.

    If I said 'not now' it's because the only other option was to update. 

    It is totally underhand that Apple then tries to 'stealth update' the phone via the passcode screen (which many will simply input to continue using the phone and get rid of the screen).

    AirDrop has worked exactly twice for me since it was released. Airplay has worked well enough but still has dropouts. iOS is severely lacking in configuration options and is a frustrating experience when going from Android. Options don't mean complexity. That's why many systems have advanced options. They are there if you need them but don't get in the way if you don't.

    If you're happy being tied to Apple, that's fine but if want to have the best of both worlds, a good Android phone or Windows laptop might be worth giving a try.
    Very logical...
    But you missed the main point of my post:   To me, the appeal of the iPhone is not the great hardware because, in a year or two it be old, slow and out dated.  But the great ecosystem that comes with it lives on and, for me, provides most of the real value.

    I get it that you don't like that ecosystem.  I do.  It provides me with services (such as the best security in the business) that I could not get elsewhere....
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 66 of 101
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 6,498member
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    Does it run iOS?
    Does it have Apple's security embedded and constantly updated?
    Does the company sell the data they collect from my phone?
    Does it automatically back up my files and configurations?
    Does it automatically share my photos with my other devices?
    Does it provide FaceTime so I can talk to my grandson?
    Can I take it the my Apple Store if I have a question or problem?
    Does it work with my Apple Watch?
    Does it track my health and fitness parameters?
    Does it....

    No?   Then what good is it?

    It's 'good' for not getting you tied into the Apple ecosystem. It is clearly an alternative. Anyone even remotely interested in this phone wouldn't expect to make FT calls and have it connect with an Apple Watch.

    That would be the whole point of even considering an Android phone.

    The temptation is bang for buck and if you are willing to not be tied into the iOS ecosystem and simply use it as another device.

    I do exactly that and have zero issues using both Android and iOS. In fact I have a long list of iOS/macOS specific features simply not working.

    My current pet peeve which I utterly detest is the update nag to iOS.

    You are told an update is available.

    You tell your phone 'not now' and it pops up the passcode screen for you to imput your code. At the bottom of that screen and in low contrast text you are told that the update will take place in the early hours of the morning if a WiFi connection is present.

    If I said 'not now' it's because the only other option was to update. 

    It is totally underhand that Apple then tries to 'stealth update' the phone via the passcode screen (which many will simply input to continue using the phone and get rid of the screen).

    AirDrop has worked exactly twice for me since it was released. Airplay has worked well enough but still has dropouts. iOS is severely lacking in configuration options and is a frustrating experience when going from Android. Options don't mean complexity. That's why many systems have advanced options. They are there if you need them but don't get in the way if you don't.

    If you're happy being tied to Apple, that's fine but if want to have the best of both worlds, a good Android phone or Windows laptop might be worth giving a try.


    Keep up the fight, troll.
    Your comment would have more weight if you actually countered with something better than labelling people.

    One of the reasons iPhone sales have been largely flat for the last few years is precisely because of phones like the one in this piece.

    Bang for buck is important for people even if it doesn't lead to Apple's pockets getting even deeper than they already are.

    It's also one of the reasons Apple has opened its model spread so wide and, by some accounts, the iPhone 6 series and SE are selling so well (given their age).

    Apple wants Android users to switch but to what? Two or three year old non full screen hardware? Or this year's (2017/18) phones? A what price point?

    The OnePlus 6 and Honor 10 and Xiaomi phones are attractive alternatives (both on design, specs and latest Android) to those users and even some iPhone users. I know three people who will be switching to Android this year.



    Please. Anyone who's read your posts (frequently full of lies and BS) knows exactly why you're here and what you are (a troll). There's really no point discussing anything with a troll as you always end up running around in circles as you constantly try and shift the narrative. And when you get called on it you play the victim.
    I'd love to help, but it's a holiday, and I've already wasted enough time on the "essential" thread with the Andy Rubin hagiography.

    (Seriously, the Google Pixel sold 25x more units in a year than the Essential Phone, and frankly, is the iPhone of Android OS devices per Vlad of the Verge.

    EDIT;

    His narrative, btw, is all about marketshare. He does not recognize ASP as a metric in line with his arguments. 

    He is, as well, unable to understand that the iPhone is, for the most part, a separate market, anecdotes about "switchers" not withstanding, and can't imagine that other Android OS device makers might be fighting over the same low ASP turf. 

    He uses, on occasion, iOS on his wife's iPhone 6, so no, not really an iOS user. 
    Oh dear. Such a bad memory. I use an iPad Mini 2 and iPad Air 2 too, every single day but if that makes me 'not really an iOS user' you will need to define what an iOS user really is. 


    gatorguy
  • Reply 67 of 101
    tmaytmay Posts: 5,824member
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    Does it run iOS?
    Does it have Apple's security embedded and constantly updated?
    Does the company sell the data they collect from my phone?
    Does it automatically back up my files and configurations?
    Does it automatically share my photos with my other devices?
    Does it provide FaceTime so I can talk to my grandson?
    Can I take it the my Apple Store if I have a question or problem?
    Does it work with my Apple Watch?
    Does it track my health and fitness parameters?
    Does it....

    No?   Then what good is it?

    It's 'good' for not getting you tied into the Apple ecosystem. It is clearly an alternative. Anyone even remotely interested in this phone wouldn't expect to make FT calls and have it connect with an Apple Watch.

    That would be the whole point of even considering an Android phone.

    The temptation is bang for buck and if you are willing to not be tied into the iOS ecosystem and simply use it as another device.

    I do exactly that and have zero issues using both Android and iOS. In fact I have a long list of iOS/macOS specific features simply not working.

    My current pet peeve which I utterly detest is the update nag to iOS.

    You are told an update is available.

    You tell your phone 'not now' and it pops up the passcode screen for you to imput your code. At the bottom of that screen and in low contrast text you are told that the update will take place in the early hours of the morning if a WiFi connection is present.

    If I said 'not now' it's because the only other option was to update. 

    It is totally underhand that Apple then tries to 'stealth update' the phone via the passcode screen (which many will simply input to continue using the phone and get rid of the screen).

    AirDrop has worked exactly twice for me since it was released. Airplay has worked well enough but still has dropouts. iOS is severely lacking in configuration options and is a frustrating experience when going from Android. Options don't mean complexity. That's why many systems have advanced options. They are there if you need them but don't get in the way if you don't.

    If you're happy being tied to Apple, that's fine but if want to have the best of both worlds, a good Android phone or Windows laptop might be worth giving a try.


    Keep up the fight, troll.
    Your comment would have more weight if you actually countered with something better than labelling people.

    One of the reasons iPhone sales have been largely flat for the last few years is precisely because of phones like the one in this piece.

    Bang for buck is important for people even if it doesn't lead to Apple's pockets getting even deeper than they already are.

    It's also one of the reasons Apple has opened its model spread so wide and, by some accounts, the iPhone 6 series and SE are selling so well (given their age).

    Apple wants Android users to switch but to what? Two or three year old non full screen hardware? Or this year's (2017/18) phones? A what price point?

    The OnePlus 6 and Honor 10 and Xiaomi phones are attractive alternatives (both on design, specs and latest Android) to those users and even some iPhone users. I know three people who will be switching to Android this year.



    Please. Anyone who's read your posts (frequently full of lies and BS) knows exactly why you're here and what you are (a troll). There's really no point discussing anything with a troll as you always end up running around in circles as you constantly try and shift the narrative. And when you get called on it you play the victim.
    I'd love to help, but it's a holiday, and I've already wasted enough time on the "essential" thread with the Andy Rubin hagiography.

    (Seriously, the Google Pixel sold 25x more units in a year than the Essential Phone, and frankly, is the iPhone of Android OS devices per Vlad of the Verge.

    EDIT;

    His narrative, btw, is all about marketshare. He does not recognize ASP as a metric in line with his arguments. 

    He is, as well, unable to understand that the iPhone is, for the most part, a separate market, anecdotes about "switchers" not withstanding, and can't imagine that other Android OS device makers might be fighting over the same low ASP turf. 

    He uses, on occasion, iOS on his wife's iPhone 6, so no, not really an iOS user. 
    Oh dear. Such a bad memory. I use an iPad Mini 2 and iPad Air 2 too, every single day but if that makes me 'not really an iOS user' you will need to define what an iOS user really is. 


    It is obvious from your posts that you don't like iOS, and have great difficulty using it efficiently, yet you still, as you note, use an iPad Mini 2 and iPad Air 2 daily.

    One would think that you would want to work in an all Android OS environment from you complaints about iOS. One would also note that many of the features that you can't get to work properly are due to you not upgrading. 

    What version(s) of iOS are you on for your iPad's? You should be on iOS 11.


    watto_cobra
  • Reply 68 of 101
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 6,498member
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    Does it run iOS?
    Does it have Apple's security embedded and constantly updated?
    Does the company sell the data they collect from my phone?
    Does it automatically back up my files and configurations?
    Does it automatically share my photos with my other devices?
    Does it provide FaceTime so I can talk to my grandson?
    Can I take it the my Apple Store if I have a question or problem?
    Does it work with my Apple Watch?
    Does it track my health and fitness parameters?
    Does it....

    No?   Then what good is it?

    It's 'good' for not getting you tied into the Apple ecosystem. It is clearly an alternative. Anyone even remotely interested in this phone wouldn't expect to make FT calls and have it connect with an Apple Watch.

    That would be the whole point of even considering an Android phone.

    The temptation is bang for buck and if you are willing to not be tied into the iOS ecosystem and simply use it as another device.

    I do exactly that and have zero issues using both Android and iOS. In fact I have a long list of iOS/macOS specific features simply not working.

    My current pet peeve which I utterly detest is the update nag to iOS.

    You are told an update is available.

    You tell your phone 'not now' and it pops up the passcode screen for you to imput your code. At the bottom of that screen and in low contrast text you are told that the update will take place in the early hours of the morning if a WiFi connection is present.

    If I said 'not now' it's because the only other option was to update. 

    It is totally underhand that Apple then tries to 'stealth update' the phone via the passcode screen (which many will simply input to continue using the phone and get rid of the screen).

    AirDrop has worked exactly twice for me since it was released. Airplay has worked well enough but still has dropouts. iOS is severely lacking in configuration options and is a frustrating experience when going from Android. Options don't mean complexity. That's why many systems have advanced options. They are there if you need them but don't get in the way if you don't.

    If you're happy being tied to Apple, that's fine but if want to have the best of both worlds, a good Android phone or Windows laptop might be worth giving a try.


    Keep up the fight, troll.
    Your comment would have more weight if you actually countered with something better than labelling people.

    One of the reasons iPhone sales have been largely flat for the last few years is precisely because of phones like the one in this piece.

    Bang for buck is important for people even if it doesn't lead to Apple's pockets getting even deeper than they already are.

    It's also one of the reasons Apple has opened its model spread so wide and, by some accounts, the iPhone 6 series and SE are selling so well (given their age).

    Apple wants Android users to switch but to what? Two or three year old non full screen hardware? Or this year's (2017/18) phones? A what price point?

    The OnePlus 6 and Honor 10 and Xiaomi phones are attractive alternatives (both on design, specs and latest Android) to those users and even some iPhone users. I know three people who will be switching to Android this year.



    Please. Anyone who's read your posts (frequently full of lies and BS) knows exactly why you're here and what you are (a troll). There's really no point discussing anything with a troll as you always end up running around in circles as you constantly try and shift the narrative. And when you get called on it you play the victim.
    I'd love to help, but it's a holiday, and I've already wasted enough time on the "essential" thread with the Andy Rubin hagiography.

    (Seriously, the Google Pixel sold 25x more units in a year than the Essential Phone, and frankly, is the iPhone of Android OS devices per Vlad of the Verge.

    EDIT;

    His narrative, btw, is all about marketshare. He does not recognize ASP as a metric in line with his arguments. 

    He is, as well, unable to understand that the iPhone is, for the most part, a separate market, anecdotes about "switchers" not withstanding, and can't imagine that other Android OS device makers might be fighting over the same low ASP turf. 

    He uses, on occasion, iOS on his wife's iPhone 6, so no, not really an iOS user. 
    Oh dear. Such a bad memory. I use an iPad Mini 2 and iPad Air 2 too, every single day but if that makes me 'not really an iOS user' you will need to define what an iOS user really is. 


    It is obvious from your posts that you don't like iOS, and have great difficulty using it efficiently, yet you still, as you note, use an iPad Mini 2 and iPad Air 2 daily.

    One would think that you would want to work in an all Android OS environment from you complaints about iOS. One would also note that many of the features that you can't get to work properly are due to you not upgrading. 

    What version(s) of iOS are you on for your iPad's? You should be on iOS 11.


    'One would think'? No.

    It's just that you can't handle a different viewpoint.

    You already know exactly what systems I am running - and why. I went through all that not long ago. No need to rehash all that.

    Things might be 'obvious/clear' to you but that doesn't make them actyally obvious/clear in the slightest. 

    In fact, most of your conclusions about me have NEVER been even remotely correct. 

    Tell me why iOS is so superior in USE than Android or the different vendor aplications of it. I can't even remember the last time I felt iOS was superior.

    I spend relatively little time in the system as a USER and much more time in apps. The rest of the time, the OS is completely invisible to me.

    I have never used a OnePlus version of Android but have plenty of experience with EMUI.

    Why are you so confident that iOS is so much better?


  • Reply 69 of 101
    At the first sentence I wondered if this testing was originally done with the base OnePlus model and upon discovering that model didn’t turn out well in comparison to the base iPhone X model the upgraded model was used and written about. Apple Insider, please confirm or deny my curiosity. If confirmed, please explain why you chose to portray the OnePlus in a better light and iPhone in a less flattering light. 

    Edit: At the first sentence of the second paragraph, I wondered... 😉
    We never tried the lower-end model.

    We are under no obligation to be flattering to an Apple product. The benchmarks are pretty clear.
    A bit defensive about my question, aren’t you? 

    No where in my question was I asking you to be flattering to iPhone X or any other Apple product.

    I was and still am curious why you chose to upgrade the OnePlus then compare the upgraded phone to the base iPhone X instead of comparing two base models.

    Since you chose to deflect answering my question, are you under any obligation to be flattering to a non-Apple product?

    We all have seen how easily Apple competitors will fake their way through benchmarks and/or pay for flattering reviews compared to an Apple product.

    And, yes the benchmarks are crystal clear for the upgraded OnePlus vs the base model of iPhone X.



    watto_cobra
  • Reply 70 of 101
    tylersdad said:
    Thanks for not doing one of those stupid App races (that everyone on YouTube always does). The most useless test ever conceived, no doubt to give Android phones somewhere to claim victory.
    I’m not sure why you believe those tests are useless. It’s nice to see how responsive a phone is in comparison to other phones. 

    They don’t simulate anything approaching real-life usage.

    - Nobody launches an App and then immediately exits/switches to another App as soon as the main screen comes up. The normal use is to actually do something within the App.
    - Nobody launches multiple CPU/RAM/GPU intensive games and randomly switches between them. People normally play a single game for some time.
    - Nobody switches constantly between 20 Apps. (there have been studies on this). Most people have around 10 Apps they use multiple times per day (email, messaging, browser and social Apps) and perhaps another 20 they use a few times a week.
    - Nobody switches numerous Apps continuously. Typically people do something on their phone, then it goes to sleep until something comes up (you get a text or call, or need to make one yourself). This is why mobile OSes are always quick to suspend Apps not doing anything and are also quick to turn off the screen and sleep when not being used.

    They are so far away from real-life usage scenarios it’s actually pathetic people make these videos in the first place.
    Above and beyond that: application switching speed has many variables involved, including how each application was implemented, and how much has to be read into RAM and such things as reading from the network or doing variable initializations, etc. such that it’s nearly impossible to say how much of the switching time is a result of the implementation details of the applications versus how much RAM a device has versus how the OS handles it.
  • Reply 71 of 101
    tmaytmay Posts: 5,824member
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    Does it run iOS?
    Does it have Apple's security embedded and constantly updated?
    Does the company sell the data they collect from my phone?
    Does it automatically back up my files and configurations?
    Does it automatically share my photos with my other devices?
    Does it provide FaceTime so I can talk to my grandson?
    Can I take it the my Apple Store if I have a question or problem?
    Does it work with my Apple Watch?
    Does it track my health and fitness parameters?
    Does it....

    No?   Then what good is it?

    It's 'good' for not getting you tied into the Apple ecosystem. It is clearly an alternative. Anyone even remotely interested in this phone wouldn't expect to make FT calls and have it connect with an Apple Watch.

    That would be the whole point of even considering an Android phone.

    The temptation is bang for buck and if you are willing to not be tied into the iOS ecosystem and simply use it as another device.

    I do exactly that and have zero issues using both Android and iOS. In fact I have a long list of iOS/macOS specific features simply not working.

    My current pet peeve which I utterly detest is the update nag to iOS.

    You are told an update is available.

    You tell your phone 'not now' and it pops up the passcode screen for you to imput your code. At the bottom of that screen and in low contrast text you are told that the update will take place in the early hours of the morning if a WiFi connection is present.

    If I said 'not now' it's because the only other option was to update. 

    It is totally underhand that Apple then tries to 'stealth update' the phone via the passcode screen (which many will simply input to continue using the phone and get rid of the screen).

    AirDrop has worked exactly twice for me since it was released. Airplay has worked well enough but still has dropouts. iOS is severely lacking in configuration options and is a frustrating experience when going from Android. Options don't mean complexity. That's why many systems have advanced options. They are there if you need them but don't get in the way if you don't.

    If you're happy being tied to Apple, that's fine but if want to have the best of both worlds, a good Android phone or Windows laptop might be worth giving a try.


    Keep up the fight, troll.
    Your comment would have more weight if you actually countered with something better than labelling people.

    One of the reasons iPhone sales have been largely flat for the last few years is precisely because of phones like the one in this piece.

    Bang for buck is important for people even if it doesn't lead to Apple's pockets getting even deeper than they already are.

    It's also one of the reasons Apple has opened its model spread so wide and, by some accounts, the iPhone 6 series and SE are selling so well (given their age).

    Apple wants Android users to switch but to what? Two or three year old non full screen hardware? Or this year's (2017/18) phones? A what price point?

    The OnePlus 6 and Honor 10 and Xiaomi phones are attractive alternatives (both on design, specs and latest Android) to those users and even some iPhone users. I know three people who will be switching to Android this year.



    Please. Anyone who's read your posts (frequently full of lies and BS) knows exactly why you're here and what you are (a troll). There's really no point discussing anything with a troll as you always end up running around in circles as you constantly try and shift the narrative. And when you get called on it you play the victim.
    I'd love to help, but it's a holiday, and I've already wasted enough time on the "essential" thread with the Andy Rubin hagiography.

    (Seriously, the Google Pixel sold 25x more units in a year than the Essential Phone, and frankly, is the iPhone of Android OS devices per Vlad of the Verge.

    EDIT;

    His narrative, btw, is all about marketshare. He does not recognize ASP as a metric in line with his arguments. 

    He is, as well, unable to understand that the iPhone is, for the most part, a separate market, anecdotes about "switchers" not withstanding, and can't imagine that other Android OS device makers might be fighting over the same low ASP turf. 

    He uses, on occasion, iOS on his wife's iPhone 6, so no, not really an iOS user. 
    Oh dear. Such a bad memory. I use an iPad Mini 2 and iPad Air 2 too, every single day but if that makes me 'not really an iOS user' you will need to define what an iOS user really is. 


    It is obvious from your posts that you don't like iOS, and have great difficulty using it efficiently, yet you still, as you note, use an iPad Mini 2 and iPad Air 2 daily.

    One would think that you would want to work in an all Android OS environment from you complaints about iOS. One would also note that many of the features that you can't get to work properly are due to you not upgrading. 

    What version(s) of iOS are you on for your iPad's? You should be on iOS 11.


    'One would think'? No.

    It's just that you can't handle a different viewpoint.

    You already know exactly what systems I am running - and why. I went through all that not long ago. No need to rehash all that.

    Things might be 'obvious/clear' to you but that doesn't make them actyally obvious/clear in the slightest. 

    In fact, most of your conclusions about me have NEVER been even remotely correct. 

    Tell me why iOS is so superior in USE than Android or the different vendor aplications of it. I can't even remember the last time I felt iOS was superior.

    I spend relatively little time in the system as a USER and much more time in apps. The rest of the time, the OS is completely invisible to me.

    I have never used a OnePlus version of Android but have plenty of experience with EMUI.

    Why are you so confident that iOS is so much better?


    I didn't say iOS was better, only that if you don't like iOS, and you obviously don't, then why are you using both iPad's and your wife's iPhone? Is it not possible to find an Android solution? 

    I also remember how unhappy you were that Apple stopped supporting Rosetta in Mac OSX. It was never meant to be long term.


    edited May 2018 watto_cobra
  • Reply 72 of 101
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 6,498member
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    Does it run iOS?
    Does it have Apple's security embedded and constantly updated?
    Does the company sell the data they collect from my phone?
    Does it automatically back up my files and configurations?
    Does it automatically share my photos with my other devices?
    Does it provide FaceTime so I can talk to my grandson?
    Can I take it the my Apple Store if I have a question or problem?
    Does it work with my Apple Watch?
    Does it track my health and fitness parameters?
    Does it....

    No?   Then what good is it?

    It's 'good' for not getting you tied into the Apple ecosystem. It is clearly an alternative. Anyone even remotely interested in this phone wouldn't expect to make FT calls and have it connect with an Apple Watch.

    That would be the whole point of even considering an Android phone.

    The temptation is bang for buck and if you are willing to not be tied into the iOS ecosystem and simply use it as another device.

    I do exactly that and have zero issues using both Android and iOS. In fact I have a long list of iOS/macOS specific features simply not working.

    My current pet peeve which I utterly detest is the update nag to iOS.

    You are told an update is available.

    You tell your phone 'not now' and it pops up the passcode screen for you to imput your code. At the bottom of that screen and in low contrast text you are told that the update will take place in the early hours of the morning if a WiFi connection is present.

    If I said 'not now' it's because the only other option was to update. 

    It is totally underhand that Apple then tries to 'stealth update' the phone via the passcode screen (which many will simply input to continue using the phone and get rid of the screen).

    AirDrop has worked exactly twice for me since it was released. Airplay has worked well enough but still has dropouts. iOS is severely lacking in configuration options and is a frustrating experience when going from Android. Options don't mean complexity. That's why many systems have advanced options. They are there if you need them but don't get in the way if you don't.

    If you're happy being tied to Apple, that's fine but if want to have the best of both worlds, a good Android phone or Windows laptop might be worth giving a try.


    Keep up the fight, troll.
    Your comment would have more weight if you actually countered with something better than labelling people.

    One of the reasons iPhone sales have been largely flat for the last few years is precisely because of phones like the one in this piece.

    Bang for buck is important for people even if it doesn't lead to Apple's pockets getting even deeper than they already are.

    It's also one of the reasons Apple has opened its model spread so wide and, by some accounts, the iPhone 6 series and SE are selling so well (given their age).

    Apple wants Android users to switch but to what? Two or three year old non full screen hardware? Or this year's (2017/18) phones? A what price point?

    The OnePlus 6 and Honor 10 and Xiaomi phones are attractive alternatives (both on design, specs and latest Android) to those users and even some iPhone users. I know three people who will be switching to Android this year.



    Please. Anyone who's read your posts (frequently full of lies and BS) knows exactly why you're here and what you are (a troll). There's really no point discussing anything with a troll as you always end up running around in circles as you constantly try and shift the narrative. And when you get called on it you play the victim.
    I'd love to help, but it's a holiday, and I've already wasted enough time on the "essential" thread with the Andy Rubin hagiography.

    (Seriously, the Google Pixel sold 25x more units in a year than the Essential Phone, and frankly, is the iPhone of Android OS devices per Vlad of the Verge.

    EDIT;

    His narrative, btw, is all about marketshare. He does not recognize ASP as a metric in line with his arguments. 

    He is, as well, unable to understand that the iPhone is, for the most part, a separate market, anecdotes about "switchers" not withstanding, and can't imagine that other Android OS device makers might be fighting over the same low ASP turf. 

    He uses, on occasion, iOS on his wife's iPhone 6, so no, not really an iOS user. 
    Oh dear. Such a bad memory. I use an iPad Mini 2 and iPad Air 2 too, every single day but if that makes me 'not really an iOS user' you will need to define what an iOS user really is. 


    It is obvious from your posts that you don't like iOS, and have great difficulty using it efficiently, yet you still, as you note, use an iPad Mini 2 and iPad Air 2 daily.

    One would think that you would want to work in an all Android OS environment from you complaints about iOS. One would also note that many of the features that you can't get to work properly are due to you not upgrading. 

    What version(s) of iOS are you on for your iPad's? You should be on iOS 11.


    'One would think'? No.

    It's just that you can't handle a different viewpoint.

    You already know exactly what systems I am running - and why. I went through all that not long ago. No need to rehash all that.

    Things might be 'obvious/clear' to you but that doesn't make them actyally obvious/clear in the slightest. 

    In fact, most of your conclusions about me have NEVER been even remotely correct. 

    Tell me why iOS is so superior in USE than Android or the different vendor aplications of it. I can't even remember the last time I felt iOS was superior.

    I spend relatively little time in the system as a USER and much more time in apps. The rest of the time, the OS is completely invisible to me.

    I have never used a OnePlus version of Android but have plenty of experience with EMUI.

    Why are you so confident that iOS is so much better?


    I didn't say iOS was better, only that if you don't like iOS, and you obviously don't, then why are you using both iPad's and your wife's iPhone? Is it not possible to find an Android solution? 

    I also remember how unhappy you were that Apple stopped supporting Rosetta in Mac OSX. It was never meant to be long term.


    No. Again.

    I use iOS for tablets and Android for phones. You know this perfectly well.

    I prefer Android for phones and iOS for tablets. You know this perfectly well too.

    You are still jumping to your own conclusions and presenting them as absolutes ('you obviously ...')

    You still haven't defined what an iOS user is for you even though you jumped into a conversation 'to help out' (help out with what, exactly? - labelling people?) and claimed I wasn't really an iOS user in spite of using two iOS devices daily!

    I have explained why I prefer Android on phones. I have even gone out of my way to make it clear that I don't have experience with all the different flavours of Android.

    You bring up Rosetta so I will assume your memory problems are selective. I know Rosetta was meant to be temporary. That is not the question. The question is that I use Snow Leopard on a couple of machines as a result of it not being available on later systems. There is no other option. Do I think Apple could have supported it for longer? Yes.

    But Rosetta? Here? You are flaying wildy trying to take the conversation anywhere to divert away from your initial claims. I have responded to most of those claims (do you really want to put ASP in this thread too!) and even to Eric. How far off topic do you want to take this?

    This thread is on the OnePlus 6. Yes, it's not an iPhone and that may not be to your liking having it mentioned on AI but in the real world lots of people use Apple products with non-Apple products so this kind of comparison is welcome IMO. AI is Apple centric, not Apple exclusive. Instead of just blindly attacking people (you are 'helping someone out' to label people, remember) for their opinions, try to engage in the discussion and defend your point of view with something that actually holds water.

    gatorguy
  • Reply 73 of 101
    aegeanaegean Posts: 161member
    I don't give a rat's rear end about benchmarks. All I care about is how well my devices work. Do they perform the functions properly and quickly? We see these stories comparing iOS devices and Macs with other products all the time, and none of them matter to me. Just because another phone is faster than an iPhone on some benchmark makes no difference to me. All I care about is the user experience. It's the same with a Mac. I don't care if Dell is making laptops that are faster than my MacBook Pro. Windows is the thing that makes me not want to buy the Dell. Regular consumers don't give a crap about benchmarks.
    This is exactly what I am tired of reading here there everywhere, comparing Apple's devices to non-Apple devices. Regardless of how fast Android devices are, they can never ever attract me just because 1) Google and 2) its OS. And no matter what Google will come up with in a decade or two, one thing is for sure that I am not going to get their OS, regardless of where the phone is coming from. However, I will wait for any other company to come up with a better OS in every aspect before I start comparing with any iOS or Apple's devices. And same applies to Mac and Mac OS. Even though Microsoft has improved Windows lately, but still a century behind in user experience that we get from Mac's OS. Having said all that, Apple is not perfect either, and they will never be, but they are way way ahead in their game and leading the whole industry.
    edited May 2018 watto_cobra
  • Reply 74 of 101
    tmay said:
    His narrative, btw, is all about marketshare. He does not recognize ASP as a metric in line with his arguments. 

    Well, we have had this marketshare Vs ASP discussion few times. I strongly believe BOTH (ASP and MarketShare) are equally important, while you are talking about ASP alone. Here is a question for you. Which of the following OEMs do you think is a "competitor" to Apple and why?

    1. OnePlus - ASP $500+. 5 devices (One Plus 3, 3T, 5, 5T and 6) launched in last 2.5 years, all with price >$500. No significant discounts for old models either.

    2. Essential - ASP $500+. Only 1 device launched in last 2 years.

    3. Google - ASP $500+. 4 devices (Pixel, Pixel XL, Pixel 2, Pixel 2XL), all with price >$600 in last 2 years. Even accounting for discounts, ASP is greater than $500 overall.

    4. Samsung - ASP $250 to $275. About 100+ models in last 2 years

    edited May 2018 Soli
  • Reply 75 of 101
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 6,498member
    aegean said:
    I don't give a rat's rear end about benchmarks. All I care about is how well my devices work. Do they perform the functions properly and quickly? We see these stories comparing iOS devices and Macs with other products all the time, and none of them matter to me. Just Sbecause another phone is faster than an iPhone on some benchmark makes no difference to me. All I care about is the user experience. It's the same with a Mac. I don't care if Dell is making laptops that are faster than my MacBook Pro. Windows is the thing that makes me not want to buy the Dell. Regular consumers don't give a crap about benchmarks.
    This is exactly what I am tired of reading here there everywhere, comparing Apple's devices to non-Apple devices. Regardless of how fast Android devices are, they can never ever attract me just because 1) Google and 2) its OS. And no matter what Google will come up with in a decade or two, one thing is for sure that I am not going to get their OS, regardless of where the phone is coming from. However, I will wait for any other company to come up with a better OS in every aspect before I start comparing with any iOS or Apple's devices. And same applies to Mac and Mac OS. Even though Microsoft has improved Windows lately, but still a century behind in user experience that we get from Mac's OS. Having said all that, Apple is not perfect either, and they will never be, but they are way way ahead in their game and leading the whole industry.
    As an opinion that's fine but some people actually like reading about benchmarks because they can reinforce (to a degree) the outlay involved on the one hand, and on the other, feel comforted knowing that their device of choice is actually a good performer when compared to the competition.

    It's true that benchmarks aren't the be all and end all but taken alongside other factors, have their value.

    As for Apple being way way ahead, I feel you are mistaken.

    Apple is actually behind in many areas. And that inlcudes the iPhone X.
  • Reply 76 of 101
    tmaytmay Posts: 5,824member
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    Does it run iOS?
    Does it have Apple's security embedded and constantly updated?
    Does the company sell the data they collect from my phone?
    Does it automatically back up my files and configurations?
    Does it automatically share my photos with my other devices?
    Does it provide FaceTime so I can talk to my grandson?
    Can I take it the my Apple Store if I have a question or problem?
    Does it work with my Apple Watch?
    Does it track my health and fitness parameters?
    Does it....

    No?   Then what good is it?

    It's 'good' for not getting you tied into the Apple ecosystem. It is clearly an alternative. Anyone even remotely interested in this phone wouldn't expect to make FT calls and have it connect with an Apple Watch.

    That would be the whole point of even considering an Android phone.

    The temptation is bang for buck and if you are willing to not be tied into the iOS ecosystem and simply use it as another device.

    I do exactly that and have zero issues using both Android and iOS. In fact I have a long list of iOS/macOS specific features simply not working.

    My current pet peeve which I utterly detest is the update nag to iOS.

    You are told an update is available.

    You tell your phone 'not now' and it pops up the passcode screen for you to imput your code. At the bottom of that screen and in low contrast text you are told that the update will take place in the early hours of the morning if a WiFi connection is present.

    If I said 'not now' it's because the only other option was to update. 

    It is totally underhand that Apple then tries to 'stealth update' the phone via the passcode screen (which many will simply input to continue using the phone and get rid of the screen).

    AirDrop has worked exactly twice for me since it was released. Airplay has worked well enough but still has dropouts. iOS is severely lacking in configuration options and is a frustrating experience when going from Android. Options don't mean complexity. That's why many systems have advanced options. They are there if you need them but don't get in the way if you don't.

    If you're happy being tied to Apple, that's fine but if want to have the best of both worlds, a good Android phone or Windows laptop might be worth giving a try.


    Keep up the fight, troll.
    Your comment would have more weight if you actually countered with something better than labelling people.

    One of the reasons iPhone sales have been largely flat for the last few years is precisely because of phones like the one in this piece.

    Bang for buck is important for people even if it doesn't lead to Apple's pockets getting even deeper than they already are.

    It's also one of the reasons Apple has opened its model spread so wide and, by some accounts, the iPhone 6 series and SE are selling so well (given their age).

    Apple wants Android users to switch but to what? Two or three year old non full screen hardware? Or this year's (2017/18) phones? A what price point?

    The OnePlus 6 and Honor 10 and Xiaomi phones are attractive alternatives (both on design, specs and latest Android) to those users and even some iPhone users. I know three people who will be switching to Android this year.



    Please. Anyone who's read your posts (frequently full of lies and BS) knows exactly why you're here and what you are (a troll). There's really no point discussing anything with a troll as you always end up running around in circles as you constantly try and shift the narrative. And when you get called on it you play the victim.
    I'd love to help, but it's a holiday, and I've already wasted enough time on the "essential" thread with the Andy Rubin hagiography.

    (Seriously, the Google Pixel sold 25x more units in a year than the Essential Phone, and frankly, is the iPhone of Android OS devices per Vlad of the Verge.

    EDIT;

    His narrative, btw, is all about marketshare. He does not recognize ASP as a metric in line with his arguments. 

    He is, as well, unable to understand that the iPhone is, for the most part, a separate market, anecdotes about "switchers" not withstanding, and can't imagine that other Android OS device makers might be fighting over the same low ASP turf. 

    He uses, on occasion, iOS on his wife's iPhone 6, so no, not really an iOS user. 
    Oh dear. Such a bad memory. I use an iPad Mini 2 and iPad Air 2 too, every single day but if that makes me 'not really an iOS user' you will need to define what an iOS user really is. 


    It is obvious from your posts that you don't like iOS, and have great difficulty using it efficiently, yet you still, as you note, use an iPad Mini 2 and iPad Air 2 daily.

    One would think that you would want to work in an all Android OS environment from you complaints about iOS. One would also note that many of the features that you can't get to work properly are due to you not upgrading. 

    What version(s) of iOS are you on for your iPad's? You should be on iOS 11.


    'One would think'? No.

    It's just that you can't handle a different viewpoint.

    You already know exactly what systems I am running - and why. I went through all that not long ago. No need to rehash all that.

    Things might be 'obvious/clear' to you but that doesn't make them actyally obvious/clear in the slightest. 

    In fact, most of your conclusions about me have NEVER been even remotely correct. 

    Tell me why iOS is so superior in USE than Android or the different vendor aplications of it. I can't even remember the last time I felt iOS was superior.

    I spend relatively little time in the system as a USER and much more time in apps. The rest of the time, the OS is completely invisible to me.

    I have never used a OnePlus version of Android but have plenty of experience with EMUI.

    Why are you so confident that iOS is so much better?


    I didn't say iOS was better, only that if you don't like iOS, and you obviously don't, then why are you using both iPad's and your wife's iPhone? Is it not possible to find an Android solution? 

    I also remember how unhappy you were that Apple stopped supporting Rosetta in Mac OSX. It was never meant to be long term.


    No. Again.

    I use iOS for tablets and Android for phones. You know this perfectly well.

    I prefer Android for phones and iOS for tablets. You know this perfectly well too.

    You are still jumping to your own conclusions and presenting them as absolutes ('you obviously ...')

    You still haven't defined what an iOS user is for you even though you jumped into a conversation 'to help out' (help out with what, exactly? - labelling people?) and claimed I wasn't really an iOS user in spite of using two iOS devices daily!

    I have explained why I prefer Android on phones. I have even gone out of my way to make it clear that I don't have experience with all the different flavours of Android.

    You bring up Rosetta so I will assume your memory problems are selective. I know Rosetta was meant to be temporary. That is not the question. The question is that I use Snow Leopard on a couple of machines as a result of it not being available on later systems. There is no other option. Do I think Apple could have supported it for longer? Yes.

    But Rosetta? Here? You are flaying wildy trying to take the conversation anywhere to divert away from your initial claims. I have responded to most of those claims (do you really want to put ASP in this thread too!) and even to Eric. How far off topic do you want to take this?

    This thread is on the OnePlus 6. Yes, it's not an iPhone and that may not be to your liking having it mentioned on AI but in the real world lots of people use Apple products with non-Apple products so this kind of comparison is welcome IMO. AI is Apple centric, not Apple exclusive. Instead of just blindly attacking people (you are 'helping someone out' to label people, remember) for their opinions, try to engage in the discussion and defend your point of view with something that actually holds water.

    Perhaps it's due to my age that I misremember so much of your previous narrative, but your current "story" is so mangled in just this thread wrt iOS, that I have trouble believing whatever your explanations posted above. Still, it's fair to state that I don't really care if people prefer and use Android OS, though I'm happy to take shots at the overall Android OS business model. Oddly enough, and in my case, I find iOS to be near identical in use on both iPhone and iPad, though the Pencil, Slide-over, and Multiview are welcome additions to the iPad. Hence why your preferences noted above seem, odd at the least.

    For the record, I use an iMac 5K, Apple TV 3, iPhone 7 Plus, iPad Pro 12.9 (first generation), Pencil and keyboard, all of which are on the latest respective revs. I also have a couple of Lenovo D20's running Windows 7, SolidWorks, Inventor HSM Ultimate, and Fusion 360. I had an original Apple Watch, but I wasn't using it as much as I thought I would and gave it to a friend's son, who used it for awhile. I will probably get an Apple Watch again at the next generation release, whenever that occurs.

    Since I am no longer on maintenance for SolidWorks, and Autodesk does a good job of support on Apple Mac's running Parallels, I'll likely abandon the Lenoovo's for daily use and move to the next generation Mac Pro when I have the chance. 

    There, transparent enough for you?
    edited May 2018 watto_cobra
  • Reply 77 of 101
    tmaytmay Posts: 5,824member

    tmay said:
    His narrative, btw, is all about marketshare. He does not recognize ASP as a metric in line with his arguments. 

    Well, we have had this marketshare Vs ASP discussion few times. I strongly believe BOTH (ASP and MarketShare) are equally important, while you are talking about ASP alone. Here is a question for you. Which of the following OEMs do you think is a "competitor" to Apple and why?

    1. OnePlus - ASP $500+. 5 devices (One Plus 3, 3T, 5, 5T and 6) launched in last 2.5 years, all with price >$500. No significant discounts for old models either.

    2. Essential - ASP $500+. Only 1 device launched in last 2 years.

    3. Google - ASP $500+. 4 devices (Pixel, Pixel XL, Pixel 2, Pixel 2XL), all with price >$600 in last 2 years. Even accounting for discounts, ASP is greater than $500 overall.

    4. Samsung - ASP $250 to $275. About 100+ models in last 2 years

    Of those, OnePlus is an Oppo brand, who knows what sales are, Essential sold something like 165,000 units all total, Google sold 3.9 million Pixel 2 for the year, leaving Samsung more as an indirect competitor to Apple; they have the best sales and distribution of Android OS devices.

    Apple's market is certainly flattening in unit sales for the iPhone, but with that, the average age of iPhones in use is near 4 years, the user base is still increasing, and their is likely still a demand for 225 million units a year, still averaging above $600 ASP.

    I also note that the YOY sales for all smartphones is down.
    edited May 2018 watto_cobra
  • Reply 78 of 101
    tmay said:

    tmay said:
    His narrative, btw, is all about marketshare. He does not recognize ASP as a metric in line with his arguments. 

    Well, we have had this marketshare Vs ASP discussion few times. I strongly believe BOTH (ASP and MarketShare) are equally important, while you are talking about ASP alone. Here is a question for you. Which of the following OEMs do you think is a "competitor" to Apple and why?

    1. OnePlus - ASP $500+. 5 devices (One Plus 3, 3T, 5, 5T and 6) launched in last 2.5 years, all with price >$500. No significant discounts for old models either.

    2. Essential - ASP $500+. Only 1 device launched in last 2 years.

    3. Google - ASP $500+. 4 devices (Pixel, Pixel XL, Pixel 2, Pixel 2XL), all with price >$600 in last 2 years. Even accounting for discounts, ASP is greater than $500 overall.

    4. Samsung - ASP $250 to $275. About 100+ models in last 2 years

    Of those, OnePlus is an Oppo brand, who knows what sales are, Essential sold something like 165,000 units all total, Google sold 3.9 million Pixel 2 for the year, leaving Samsung more as an indirect competitor to Apple; they have the best sales and distribution of Android OS devices.

    Apple's market is certainly flattening in unit sales for the iPhone, but with that, the average age of iPhones in use is near 4 years, the user base is still increasing, and their is likely still a demand for 225 million units a year, still averaging above $600 ASP.

    I also note that the YOY sales for all smartphones is down.

    The question is - Does Market Share matter at all, or NOT? And Why?
    Soli
  • Reply 79 of 101
    tmay said:

    tmay said:
    His narrative, btw, is all about marketshare. He does not recognize ASP as a metric in line with his arguments. 

    Well, we have had this marketshare Vs ASP discussion few times. I strongly believe BOTH (ASP and MarketShare) are equally important, while you are talking about ASP alone. Here is a question for you. Which of the following OEMs do you think is a "competitor" to Apple and why?

    1. OnePlus - ASP $500+. 5 devices (One Plus 3, 3T, 5, 5T and 6) launched in last 2.5 years, all with price >$500. No significant discounts for old models either.

    2. Essential - ASP $500+. Only 1 device launched in last 2 years.

    3. Google - ASP $500+. 4 devices (Pixel, Pixel XL, Pixel 2, Pixel 2XL), all with price >$600 in last 2 years. Even accounting for discounts, ASP is greater than $500 overall.

    4. Samsung - ASP $250 to $275. About 100+ models in last 2 years

    Of those, OnePlus is an Oppo brand, who knows what sales are, Essential sold something like 165,000 units all total, Google sold 3.9 million Pixel 2 for the year, leaving Samsung more as an indirect competitor to Apple; they have the best sales and distribution of Android OS devices.

    Apple's market is certainly flattening in unit sales for the iPhone, but with that, the average age of iPhones in use is near 4 years, the user base is still increasing, and their is likely still a demand for 225 million units a year, still averaging above $600 ASP.

    I also note that the YOY sales for all smartphones is down.

    The question is - Does Market Share matter at all, or NOT? And Why?
    Well, in the ultimate analysis, profits are what matter and we know that almost the entire profits of the mobile industry belong to Apple. Android has the larger market share and Google monetizes it primarily through collecting user data and serving ads, so they do make money, but nowhere near Apple's scale of either revenue or profits.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 80 of 101
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,506member
    tmay said:

    tmay said:
    His narrative, btw, is all about marketshare. He does not recognize ASP as a metric in line with his arguments. 

    Well, we have had this marketshare Vs ASP discussion few times. I strongly believe BOTH (ASP and MarketShare) are equally important, while you are talking about ASP alone. Here is a question for you. Which of the following OEMs do you think is a "competitor" to Apple and why?

    1. OnePlus - ASP $500+. 5 devices (One Plus 3, 3T, 5, 5T and 6) launched in last 2.5 years, all with price >$500. No significant discounts for old models either.

    2. Essential - ASP $500+. Only 1 device launched in last 2 years.

    3. Google - ASP $500+. 4 devices (Pixel, Pixel XL, Pixel 2, Pixel 2XL), all with price >$600 in last 2 years. Even accounting for discounts, ASP is greater than $500 overall.

    4. Samsung - ASP $250 to $275. About 100+ models in last 2 years

    Of those, OnePlus is an Oppo brand, who knows what sales are, Essential sold something like 165,000 units all total, Google sold 3.9 million Pixel 2 for the year, leaving Samsung more as an indirect competitor to Apple; they have the best sales and distribution of Android OS devices.

    Apple's market is certainly flattening in unit sales for the iPhone, but with that, the average age of iPhones in use is near 4 years, the user base is still increasing, and their is likely still a demand for 225 million units a year, still averaging above $600 ASP.

    I also note that the YOY sales for all smartphones is down.

    The question is - Does Market Share matter at all, or NOT? And Why?
    Well, in the ultimate analysis, profits are what matter and we know that almost the entire profits of the mobile industry belong to Apple. Android has the larger market share and Google monetizes it primarily through collecting user data and serving ads, so they do make money, but nowhere near Apple's scale of either revenue or profits.
    Yet Google is still one of the most successful and profitable companies on the planet, a huge presence in mobile across all platforms, a leading developer on iOS, and the world's most valuable brand. Not being the richest does not equal fail. 
    edited May 2018 muthuk_vanalingam
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