Apple leaves would-be iPhone developers hanging for the moment

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
A number of applicants to Apple's official iPhone Developer program are venting their frustration with the company after having received temporary rejection letters on Friday.



The majority of the backlash, as outlined by sites like ArsTechnica and TUAW, appears to stem from the ambiguity of the non-acceptance letters and a lack of information regarding the specific criteria used by Cupertino-based company to decipher who is eligible for early acceptance and who is not.



"Thank you for expressing interest in the iPhone Developer Program. We have received your enrollment request," Apple wrote in an email sent to the vast majority of those who applied. "As this time, the iPhone Developer Program is available to a limited number of developers and we plan to expand during the beta period. We will contact you again regarding your enrollment status at the appropriate time."



Applicants outside the United States received a different response but to the same result: "Thank you for expressing interest in the iPhone Developer Program. We have received your enrollment request. *At this time, the iPhone Developer Program is only available in the US and will expand to other countries during the beta period. *We will contact you again regarding your enrollment status at the appropriate time. Thank you for applying."



In what may be some condolence to those applying, it's reported that Apple does not appear to be discriminating between corporations and developers of various stature. Instead, the policy appears to be that of gradual expansion during the ongoing beta stage, as noted by MacRumors, the only publication thus far to have claimed knowledge of some developers receiving Apple's official endorsement into the program.



Still, that's left those not so fortunate to wonder what affect their temporary rejection will have on their ability to garner a portion of the $100 million iFund launched by venture capitalist firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers to help support aspiring iPhone application creators.



"Got my rejection email, today. Know someone else who did, also," said Chad, a prospective developer commenting on the matter over at iLounge . "Suppose iFund will wanna float any money my way now that apple has ditched me? I doubt it. Ah… thanks Apple."



But are there real grounds for paranoia at this point? Likely no, the publication suggests. It notes that that temporary rejection letters arriving in droves on Friday simply reiterate what was stated by Apple chief executive Steve Jobs last week while announcing the program: that it would be available only to a "limited number of developers" in the early stage, with substantially more gaining their digital certificate and access to the beta version of iPhone software v2.0 as its final June release approaches.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 134
    This is in such poor taste on Apple's part. There is simply no need for such curtness and rudeness. Moreover, I cannot understand the need being so taciturn with information -- to lend some additional context would have been no skin off their collective a55e5.



    Boo, Mr. Jobs!



    (I am not a developer, nor do I do anything remotely related to software development).
  • Reply 2 of 134
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,523member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    This is in such poor taste on Apple's part. There is simply no need for such curtness and rudeness. Moreover, I cannot understand the need being so taciturn with information -- to lend some additional context would have been no skin off their collective a55e5..



    Seemed perfectly polite and business like to me.
  • Reply 3 of 134
    1. Apple stated they're initially limiting the number of accepted developers.

    2. Apparently that number has been reached.

    3. Subsequent applications are being rejected,for now.

    4. Why is it so difficult to grasp this concept.



    Boo whiners!
  • Reply 4 of 134
    davegeedavegee Posts: 2,765member
    So I guess this means that OS X 10.6 wont be an everyones-invited free-for-all either...



    Developers more than anyone should know that having an ENORMOUS pool of beta testers for a program they are developing is NOT such a good thing.. I can only imagine its the same (if not more so) for SDK and firmware development and seed testing.



    Dave
  • Reply 5 of 134
    dreyfus2dreyfus2 Posts: 1,072member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    Still, that's left those not so fortunate to wonder what affect their temporary rejection will have on their ability to garner a portion of the $100 million iFund launched by venture capitalist firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers to help support aspiring iPhone application creators.



    What do I miss here? You do not need the beta nor the certificate to develop applications - all you need is the SDK which is freely available. A venture capital company like KPCB will require a concept, a business plan etc. but certainly no running application (and even IF they require a demonstration of any kind, you can bring your laptop with the SDK installed and show everything using the simulator). Do we have "find the catch" season?



    It took hackers less than three days to get access to and hack the beta - of course Apple does limit distribution. Nothing wrong with that.
  • Reply 6 of 134
    minderbinderminderbinder Posts: 1,703member
    I don't get what the fuss is about, other than ego issues.



    It's in beta, it won't be released to actual users for months. As long as devs are accepted by the time 2.0 ships, what's the difference?
  • Reply 7 of 134
    michaelbmichaelb Posts: 242member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JimUrban View Post


    1. Apple stated they're initially limiting the number of accepted developers.

    2. Apparently that number has been reached.

    3. Subsequent applications are being rejected,for now.

    4. Why is it so difficult to grasp this concept.



    Boo whiners!



    Because:



    1. Apple announced the SDK in October 2007 for a planned February release date.

    2. The recent SDK presentation received an enormous amount of hype, top billing on apple.com etc.

    3. The SDK had both missed the planned February release date and turned out to be still in Beta form.

    4. The downloadable SDK is largely incomplete for being able to be used to test applications: no transfer to device for testing the key areas of iPhone usage such touch UI, OpenGL ES graphics, and accelerometer interactions.

    5. The majority of developers have been denied access to the full form beta SDK and appear to be out of luck until June.

    6. They are frustrated from being to made to wait even longer for something they thought they would be getting in Feb.



    While I understand Apple's tardiness and willingness to keep tight security around their upcoming firmware release and certificate keys, I can also understand the whining.
  • Reply 8 of 134
    merdheadmerdhead Posts: 587member
    Setting aside how or what Apple is doing, it's not the biggest deal. The emulator is quite effective, and short of later testing and polishing, it will suffice. It is annoying and not the same as running on the final hardware, but at this early stage should not make a difference, including to those seeking funding. I'm sure if they secured funding Apple would give them access.
  • Reply 9 of 134
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post


    Seemed perfectly polite and business like to me.



    To me, on the other hand, it sounded like a perfectly polite and business like way of saying "get lost." I thought they could easily have explained why in a nicer tone.



    It is just that, as a shareholder, I worry about how Apple is increasingly perceived as just another rude corporation.
  • Reply 10 of 134
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,334member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    To me, on the other hand, it sounded like a perfectly polite and business like way of saying "get lost." I thought they could easily have explained why in a nicer tone.



    It is just that, as a shareholder, I worry about how Apple is increasingly perceived as just another rude corporation.



    It was terse, but it looks the same as other corporations send out. Nothing unusual here. Likely the legal department had to vet this first, and this is the neutral letter that resulted.



    What we would need to know, is how many of the downloaded SDK's were for real developers, and how many were from people who just wanted to look at it. That would give us some idea as to how many actually applied for official status.



    It's likely too many for Apple to keep track of in the beginning. I also wonder how they were chosen. Was it first come, first served?
  • Reply 11 of 134
    parkyparky Posts: 383member
    Just get over the fact that you have not been selected in the initial batch!



    No one has died!!!
  • Reply 12 of 134
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    Quote:

    "Got my rejection email, today. Know someone else who did, also," said Chad, a prospective developer commenting on the matter over at iLounge . "Suppose iFund will wanna float any money my way now that apple has ditched me? I doubt it. Ah? thanks Apple."



    Poor Chad... guess Apple's washed up now. Sell your stock and turn in your badges!
  • Reply 13 of 134
    gqbgqb Posts: 1,934member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by michaelb View Post


    Because:



    1. Apple announced the SDK in October 2007 for a planned February release date.

    2. The recent SDK presentation received an enormous amount of hype, top billing on apple.com etc.

    3. The SDK had both missed the planned February release date and turned out to be still in Beta form.

    4. The downloadable SDK is largely incomplete for being able to be used to test applications: no transfer to device for testing the key areas of iPhone usage such touch UI, OpenGL ES graphics, and accelerometer interactions.

    5. The majority of developers have been denied access to the full form beta SDK and appear to be out of luck until June.

    6. They are frustrated from being to made to wait even longer for something they thought they would be getting in Feb.



    While I understand Apple's tardiness and willingness to keep tight security around their upcoming firmware release and certificate keys, I can also understand the whining.



    1. operative word 'planned'.

    2. and...? well played.

    3. No it didn't... it was in the hands of some developers. Talk about pickey... a week late. That's razor precision by industry standards.

    4. Its called a beta

    5. Whaaaaa? What in gods name is a 'full form beta'.

    6. sorry... grow up.



    No, this is whining pure and simple.
  • Reply 14 of 134
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 2,586member
    Give me a break! How in the hell do they know a "vast majority" of developers were denied? Do they know how many signed up? Do they really know how many were actually turned down? I doubt it.



    I'm sure in time the developer program will open up to many, many others as they work the kinks out of the SDK. It wouldn't be wise to except everyone, you should set a limit. That way, when a change is made to the SDK, you won't have tens of thousands of developers to deal/work with.



    And honestly, there's three months left until anyone's application makes it to other's iPhone. There is plenty of time. Bunch of impatient whiners.
  • Reply 15 of 134
    The SDK is just in beta testing, folks! Apple's just trying to make sure it works before it is released for real and get feedback from those who are using it. Therefore, I do not think everyone should jump to conclusions just yet and strongly recommend to wait until this Kit is in its full version.



    BETA SOFTWARE IS A PROTOTYPE - NOT THE REAL THING!
  • Reply 16 of 134
    doh123doh123 Posts: 323member
    why do people call this rejection letters... its not a rejection letter or even close... its a "your on the waiting list" letter... sheesh. Talk about trying to spin a innocent letter and beta development in a bad light.
  • Reply 17 of 134
    dave k.dave k. Posts: 1,306member
    Enterprise customers won't put up with crap like this this. So much for Apple trying to learn from past mistakes.
  • Reply 18 of 134
    stokessdstokessd Posts: 103member
    I DIDN'T get a rejection letter, so maybe I made the cut. I pounded the snot out of the website as the roadmap was being announced to get in and maybe I actually got in under the wire.



    Sheldon
  • Reply 19 of 134
    min_tmin_t Posts: 74member
    Thank God these developers were rejected. Nowhere in Apple's presentation did they say that when you sign up for the iPhone developer program that you "Otomatically" become a beta tester.



    Relax. You simply found out you're not in the A list, that's all. Run along and tell mommy.
  • Reply 20 of 134
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,951member
    While it is a beta, would it really be a problem for Apple to allow them entry vs. not? Too many applicants/testers to manage? Maybe it could be bad for the developers in the test pool if fundemental changes to the frameworks are needed, and significant rewrites are needed to software once the system is finalized?
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