iPhone tops business rankings, steals Nokia market share

Posted:
in iPhone edited May 2014
Often labeled the outsider in the corporate world, Apple's iPhone has already reached the top of J.D. Power's satisfaction ranks for business smartphones -- and is simultaneously the second-largest smartphone maker in the world.



Owners contributing to the product ratings company's yearly study gave Apple top marks among all the smartphone manufacturers operating in the US for its 2008 satisfaction report, awarding it a score of 778 out of 800, rising well above second-place Research in Motion's 703 for its BlackBerry phones and further still past the industry average of 681.



Expectedly, the iPhone performs best with ease of use, feature set and design, all elements J.D. Power says are essential to a good smartphone. Of the top five reasons for picking a phone, 45 percent of those involved in the study cited Apple's strength, Internet access, as their primary reason. Email (41 percent), design (39 percent), Bluetooth support (37 percent) and keyboard layouts (also 37 percent) played similar roles.



And while Samsung has nearly tied RIM in satisfaction with its own lineup, the major makers sitting below the average were those who use Windows Mobile heavily or exclusively for their smartphones, such as HTC and Motorola. Palm, which uses both its own Palm OS and Windows Mobile, has trailed well behind the pack with a score of just 644.



The result was telling for Apple, which failed to rank at all in the 2007 report but is now the best-rated in its home country.



Not all was positive for Apple: while the average asking price for a smartphone was $216, the Cupertino, Calif.-based newcomer's average purchase price was highest at $337. This stems in part from purchases before the launch of the iPhone 3G, when most customers would have paid $400 or more. Motorola's phones were the least expensive at $169.



The award for the top spot among workers comes as researchers at Canalys confirmed that Apple is now the second-largest smartphone producer in terms of volume. Its nearly 6.9 million iPhones shipped during the summer gave it 17.3 percent of the market during the period and validated Apple's eagerness to tout that it had outsold the BlackBerry for the first time. RIM's phone represented 15.2 percent of world smartphone market share.







Apple's sharp, sudden push into the highest ranks has had a ripple effect on incumbents as a result. Of al those hurt, the worst affected is Nokia, which saw its lead erode from a commanding 51.4 percent in summer of last year to 38.9 percent in the wake of iPhone 3G's launch. Symbian, which powers all of Nokia's phones, also took a tumble from its presence on 68.1 percent of all shipping phones to 46.6 percent.



And as with J.D. Power's study, Microsoft has also taken a bruising. Represented by the collective number of Windows Mobile smartphones, the software developer now sits in a modest fourth place with 13.6 percent of the market to itself.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 132
    1. Iphone is not a smartphone.



    2. I haven't seen a single person with a Nokia in the last 5 years
  • Reply 2 of 132
    phizzphizz Posts: 142member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dueces View Post


    1. Iphone is not a smartphone.



    2. I haven't seen a single person with a Nokia in the last 5 years



    1. Yes, it is. Although there is no agreed industry definition for "smartphone", the iPhone (note the capitalisation) matches or surpasses all the definitions out there in terms of features and capabilities.



    2. You probably have actaully.
  • Reply 3 of 132
    adjeiadjei Posts: 738member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dueces View Post


    1. Iphone is not a smartphone.



    2. I haven't seen a single person with a Nokia in the last 5 years



    Right..
  • Reply 4 of 132
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    Often labeled the outsider in the corporate world, Apple's iPhone has already reached the top of J.D. Power's satisfaction ranks for business smartphones -- and is simultaneously the second-largest smartphone maker in the world.



    Owners contributing to the product ratings company's yearly study gave Apple top marks among all the smartphone manufacturers operating in the US for its 2008 satisfaction report, awarding it a score of 778 out of 800, rising well above second-place Research in Motion's 703 for its BlackBerry phones and further still past the industry average of 681.



    Expectedly, the iPhone performs best with ease of use, feature set and design, all elements J.D. Power says are essential to a good smartphone. Of the top five reasons for picking a phone, 45 percent of those involved in the study cited Apple's strength, Internet access, as their primary reason. Email (41 percent), design (39 percent), Bluetooth support (37 percent) and keyboard layouts (also 37 percent) played similar roles.



    And while Samsung has nearly tied RIM in satisfaction with its own lineup, the major makers sitting below the average were those who use Windows Mobile heavily or exclusively for their smartphones, such as HTC and Motorola. Palm, which uses both its own Palm OS and Windows Mobile, has trailed well behind the pack with a score of just 644.



    The result was telling for Apple, which failed to rank at all in the 2007 report but is now the best-rated in its home country.



    Not all was positive for Apple: while the average asking price for a smartphone was $216, the Cupertino, Calif.-based newcomer's average purchase price was highest at $337. This stems in part from purchases before the launch of the iPhone 3G, when most customers would have paid $400 or more. Motorola's phones were the least expensive at $169.



    The award for the top spot among workers comes as researchers at Canalys confirmed that Apple is now the second-largest smartphone producer in terms of volume. Its nearly 6.9 million iPhones shipped during the summer gave it 17.3 percent of the market during the period and validated Apple's eagerness to tout that it had outsold the BlackBerry for the first time. RIM's phone represented 15.2 percent of world smartphone market share.







    Apple's sharp, sudden push into the highest ranks has had a ripple effect on incumbents as a result. Of al those hurt, the worst affected is Nokia, which saw its lead erode from a commanding 51.4 percent in summer of last year to 38.9 percent in the wake of iPhone 3G's launch. Symbian, which powers all of Nokia's phones, also took a tumble from its presence on 68.1 percent of all shipping phones to 46.6 percent.



    And as with J.D. Power's study, Microsoft has also taken a bruising. Represented by the collective number of Windows Mobile smartphones, the software developer now sits in a modest fourth place with 13.6 percent of the market to itself.





    Hmmm......



    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smartphone
  • Reply 5 of 132
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Phizz View Post


    1. Yes, it is. Although there is no agreed industry definition for "smartphone", the iPhone (note the capitalisation) matches or surpasses all the definitions out there in terms of features and capabilities.



    2. You probably have actaully.



    1. Smartphone needs to off the top of my head (will think of more):



    View and edit: Word and Excel.

    View: PDF

    Copy and paste

    Transfer files back and forth with other devices through bluetooth

    Be able to connect to other computing devices through bluetooth



    Not sure which of these the iphone can and cannot do, I'll leave that up to someone else.



    2. Possibly in the case at a mall kiosk or something, but I have never seen one in an actual persons possession in the last 5 years.
  • Reply 6 of 132
    irelandireland Posts: 16,899member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dueces View Post


    1. Iphone is not a smartphone.



    2. I haven't seen a single person with a Nokia in the last 5 years



    Half the phones sold in the world are made by a company called Nokia, I can only assume you have no clue about technology.
  • Reply 7 of 132
    Only a matter of time... Apple, Inc. will be renamed, "iPhone, Inc."



  • Reply 8 of 132
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    While Nokia is losing marketshare in the US, they are not a US-based company. Nokia has publicly stated the areas in which they are behind and have taken many efforts to adapt to these changes. I see no reason to believe that Nokia's expertise in cellphones and their recent acquisition of Symbian and Qt, with a partnership with FF will not have Nokia a leading mobile OS in Europe in the next year or so. Whatever you think of Nokia, counting them out of the running is like counting Apple out of the running back in the late 90s.
  • Reply 9 of 132
    piotpiot Posts: 1,346member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dueces View Post


    1. Iphone is not a smartphone.



    I'm a PC!



    Quote:

    2. I haven't seen a single person with a Nokia in the last 5 years



    You ought to get out more!
  • Reply 10 of 132
    nagrommenagromme Posts: 2,834member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dueces View Post


    1. Smartphone needs to off the top of my head (will think of more):



    Everyone can craft their own definition for what THEY want from a smartphone. If they wish to come up with a definition that leads them away from an iPhone, that's fair enough. But that personal definition won't extend to everyone.



    My definition would be simpler: a phone that is capable of running software, using both text and GUI input. (In other words, a numeric pad alone is not enough.) I wouldn't even demand Internet access, any more than I would include that in the definition of a personal computer. However, Internet access is one of the things that makes a good and useful smartphone as opposed to a poor one.
  • Reply 11 of 132
    phizzphizz Posts: 142member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dueces View Post


    1. Smartphone needs to off the top of my head (will think of more):



    View and edit: Word and Excel.

    View: PDF

    Copy and paste

    Transfer files back and forth with other devices through bluetooth

    Be able to connect to other computing devices through bluetooth



    Not sure which of these the iphone can and cannot do, I'll leave that up to someone else.



    Well you seem to be going by your own definition in that case (and you've also admitted that you are "not sure" which features it has/doesn't have anyway). I can confirm the iPhone does have your first two (except edit Word files- that is not a phone's job), does not have the third (yet), and I too am unsure about its Bluetooth features as I don't use them.



    I'd still call it a smartphone. Saying it is not a smartphone because of lack of copy and paste (for example) is like saying a car is not technically a car because it doesn't have ABS braking. Damn useful, but not essential.
  • Reply 12 of 132
    jfanningjfanning Posts: 3,371member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    Symbian, which powers all of Nokia's phones, also took a tumble from its presence on 68.1 percent of all shipping phones to 46.6 percent.



    Umm, Symbian does not power all of Nokias phones
  • Reply 13 of 132
    piotpiot Posts: 1,346member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dueces View Post


    1. Smartphone needs to off the top of my head (will think of more).



    How about......



    Have a 'real' keyboard

    Fm radio

    Play subscription music

    Smell (a little bit) like peanut butter

    Run Mojave OS

    Have a 360 page manual

    Make me feel important

    Not be an iPhone



    Just out the back of my ass(will think of more)
  • Reply 14 of 132
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    While Nokia is losing marketshare in the US, they are not a US-based company. Nokia has publicly stated the areas in which they are behind and have taken many efforts to adapt to these changes. I see no reason to believe that Nokia's expertise in cellphones and their recent acquisition of Symbian and Qt, with a partnership with FF will not have Nokia a leading mobile OS in Europe in the next or so. Whatever you think of Nokia, counting them out of the running is like counting Apple out of the running back in the late 90s.



    I'm mostly in agreement with your posts, but I'm fairly convinced of Nokia's demise. Unless they back Android in a big way I think they will slip off the radar sharpish.
  • Reply 15 of 132
    The bluetooth support (37%) is hilarious to me.



    This being the phone that only connects to Apple's headset?
  • Reply 16 of 132
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by piot View Post


    How about......



    Have a 'real' keyboard

    Fm radio

    Play subscription music

    Smell (a little bit) like peanut butter

    Run Mojave OS

    Have a 360 page manual

    Make me feel important

    Not be an iPhone



    Just out the back of my ass(will think of more)



    Dueces just joined and is a troll.
  • Reply 17 of 132
    irelandireland Posts: 16,899member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post


    Only a matter of time... Apple, Inc. will be renamed, "iPhone, Inc."







  • Reply 18 of 132
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ireland View Post


    Half the phones sold in the world are made by a company called Nokia, I can only assume you have no clue about technology.



    Well I live in the US. I have had Sprint, Verizon, and Nextel the last 9 years. I have had well over 60 different cell phones personally and am generally considered a cell phone expert by people who know me. I can and have disassembled thousands of cell phones. From 2001-2003 I ran a service where people sent me their cell phones and I modded them, which made me about $20,000 a year in my spare time,



    I have never had GSM service (ATT/Tmobile) cause frankly the call quality is horrible and the data network is worse than a 3rd world countries network.



    While I have never had ATT/Tmobile, obviously I have known people who have and out of all of them, and out of all random people I have observed on the street, I have not seen a Nokia phone with my own eyes in the last 5 years.
  • Reply 19 of 132
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by piot View Post




    Just out the back of my ass(will think of more)



    /Holding nose/



    Please don't..... thanks.
  • Reply 20 of 132
    mark2005mark2005 Posts: 1,158member
    What's amazing to me is that the satisfaction gap between Apple and the next highest rated (RIM) is larger than the gap between RIM and the last place finisher (Palm). 75 vs 69! It really demonstrates how far ahead Apple really is.



    If Apple steadily keeps upgrading the iPhone OS and keeps the App Store growing, other vendors will be hard pressed to close that gap.
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