iPhone found ready for enterprise, better than BlackBerry

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
A close study has shown that opening the doors to iPhones at large-scale business has not only made workers happier but has often saved money over competing smartphones in the process.



In a report issued last week, Ted Schadler of Forrester Research has presented an about-face for the research group's attitude towards iPhones that recommends businesses consider the devices for their network and that many users are genuinely more interested in accessing work content on an iPhone than on corporate mainstays using Microsoft or Research in Motion software. Using the web is a "chore" on a BlackBerry but intuitive on an iPhone, Schadler writes, and many workers are ultimately happier when they can pick their phones instead of having that choice dictated by IT.



Where Forrester had previously warned companies to avoid iPhones when possible due to the high phone prices and lack of security, it now says that many of these legacy worries have been softened significantly in the wake of Apple's iPhone 2.x firmware and uses Amylin Pharmaceutical, Kraft Foods, and Oracle as examples of how permitting the phones ultimately helped their respective bottom lines.



Amylin's senior IT director Todd Stewart describes iPhones as being easier to support than "other mobile platforms" and that iPhone 2.0's hooks for Exchange calendaring and e-mail meant it only took three days to ready the 3,000-person firm to support iPhones. The relative strength of mobile Safari and the e-mail client has led many to treat their systems more like netbooks than mobile devices.



On a pure cost basis, the phones themselves are less expensive to run: their combined plans save about $360 per year, per phone. Stewart adds that individual ownership of devices, instead of handing them out from a corporate pool, has also trimmed costs by persuading workers they should be more careful with their smartphones.



"If an employee owns his own device, the phone tends to hit the pavement a lot less," he says.



Kraft, meanwhile, emphasizes that the iPhone was brought in to support a "culture change" at the company and that many of those using iPhones are happier than they were before they switched. It pushes the company at large to use newer technology and has been cutting costs by letting iPhone owners get their own support rather than depend on the company alone for help. "Overall they provide better support than we can," one person from the company's IT management says.



Oracle sees the iPhone's software development base as a way of rendering its business tools mobile and sees the smartphone as offering possibilities that weren't there before. The company plans to develop apps for customer relations management and other key aspects of its business, and at the iPhone 3.0 SDK event demonstrated some of these apps in advance of their release.



Some problems still remain and range from hardware to purely administrative issues. Besides the sometimes short battery life, calendar sync and VPN auto-login aren't fully in place. Management tools to control the phones' security are still relatively scarce, and features that are for now taken for granted in veteran mobile operating systems, like copy-and-paste text, aren't in place as of April. As many businesses won't necessarily keep traditional company-wide accounts, it's often necessary to move users either to individual corporate accounts or even personal accounts that are matched with official compensation.



iPhone 3.0's release in the summer should address some of these problems, particularly CalDAV for calendars, a more automated VPN login process, and significantly tighter security policies that involve disabling built-in cameras in high-security environments as well as creating encrypted backups.



Even with the immediate hurdles, all three of the sample companies have had rapid growth or expect to in the future. Oracle currently counts 4,000 iPhones among its total mobile base; Kraft is adding 400 phones a month and may top 5,000 by December, while Amylin despite its size still anticipates that as many as 650 of its smartphone-equipped workers -- or 75 percent -- will use iPhones by the end of the year.



And notions that BlackBerries are go-to devices should fade, according to Schadler, who argues that smartphone use is no longer dominated solely by e-mail and schedules, with other functions often falling short on those phones that center too heavily on obvious corporate uses.



"We find the BlackBerry better for email and calendaring and the iPhone better for everything else," he notes.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 272
    rhowarthrhowarth Posts: 144member
    It's good to see an analyst who understands some of the less obviously tangible but still very real advantages of giving people a device they actually want to use.
  • Reply 2 of 272
    ltmpltmp Posts: 204member
    There are only two things stopping me from using my iPhone for work.



    1) I would need a North American data and voice plan as I travel extensively between the US and Canada.



    2) My IT department.
  • Reply 3 of 272
    ulfoafulfoaf Posts: 175member
    I have an iPhone and love it, but I don't use it for work. There are some things that people miss for business use, as often been repeated:



    Searching email

    cut and paste

    store and email attachments from the phone



    3.0 will take care of the first two, right? How about the ability to attach files?



    No doubt it is far, far better than a Blackberry for internet access. It you are using web based applications at work, it would be a better choice.
  • Reply 4 of 272
    al_bundyal_bundy Posts: 1,525member
    can you load apps on an iphone without itunes?



    not very corporate if you want to load a sales app for your sales force and you have to use the App Store to do it. one the blackberry you can load apps by packaging them into an executable
  • Reply 5 of 272
    While the form factor of most Blackberries (in particular the newish Curve model) is excellent for typing, after all the hype and seeing so many of them on the train in the hands of 'suits', I have spent time playing around with most models in my local Vodafone store. I cannot believe why people prefer them over even a regular Nokia or Sony Ericsson - never mind the way more intuitive iPhone? While the industrial design and keyboards are great, the GUI is inconsistent and looks like an early 1980s VDU/Terminal! Even the (awful) Storm is ugly and a pain to use once you have got beyond the sexy styling and icons.



    The iPhone is quite simply light years ahead in stability and usability - and to be frank, if the whole planet got to play with one, (and it had a better camera and was thinner), the iPhone could occupy an even larger chunk of ALL markets, from kids to corporate. It's robust hardware and OS means that the iPhone will remain relevant and in your pocket so much longer, the price is less of an issue. It is an investment.



    (Do I sound like an Apple fanboy? Actually, I am a Mac user, but the iPhone is what makes me a fan - the OS is so incredible. I actually think Apple should dump OS X desktop and create large 'iPhone' type devices from the rumored 7 to 10" giant iPod Touch to 30" iMac Touches. Imagine PhotoShop or Excel with multitouch? They would be so much easier and faster to operate.)



    Phew! Bed time. (Oh, guess what, I don't even have an iPhone, but I do have an iPod Touch V2. Lovely!)
  • Reply 6 of 272
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,656member
    I'm not surprised. I hear similar things for those I know.



    About attachments, I would imagine we would be able to with C/paste. That's the point to it.
  • Reply 7 of 272
    hezekiahbhezekiahb Posts: 448member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ulfoaf View Post


    I have an iPhone and love it, but I don't use it for work. There are some things that people miss for business use, as often been repeated:



    Searching email

    cut and paste

    store and email attachments from the phone



    3.0 will take care of the first two, right? How about the ability to attach files?



    No doubt it is far, far better than a Blackberry for internet access. It you are using web based applications at work, it would be a better choice.



    I'm not sure I get why people like the BlackBerry better for e-mail. I have one & hate it, I think the interface is absolutely horrible.



    I am in the IT department where I work & have gotten to work with iPhones quite a bit while setting them up with wifi & exchange. I can't wait for Snow Leopard as I hate Entourage. It'd be nice if I could switch from my BlackBerry to an iPhone.



    For me it isn't cool factor or the web capabilities. I just get sick of these apps that are so cluttered & difficult to use.
  • Reply 8 of 272
    pk22901pk22901 Posts: 138member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by al_bundy View Post


    can you load apps on an iphone without itunes?



    not very corporate if you want to load a sales app for your sales force and you have to use the App Store to do it. one the blackberry you can load apps by packaging them into an executable



    Check Page 11 of this pdf:



    http://images.apple.com/iphone/enter...Enterprise.pdf



    A little info can make a big difference, I guess.
  • Reply 9 of 272
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 4,612member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by al_bundy View Post


    can you load apps on an iphone without itunes?



    not very corporate if you want to load a sales app for your sales force and you have to use the App Store to do it. one the blackberry you can load apps by packaging them into an executable



    An enterprise developer allows download without the need for iTunes.
  • Reply 10 of 272
    dagamer34dagamer34 Posts: 494member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ulfoaf View Post


    I have an iPhone and love it, but I don't use it for work. There are some things that people miss for business use, as often been repeated:



    Searching email

    cut and paste

    store and email attachments from the phone



    3.0 will take care of the first two, right? How about the ability to attach files?



    No doubt it is far, far better than a Blackberry for internet access. It you are using web based applications at work, it would be a better choice.



    The last one would probably require some type of file-system application, and that's not likely to be in 3.0. Maybe next year?
  • Reply 11 of 272
    nagrommenagromme Posts: 2,834member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by al_bundy View Post


    can you load apps on an iphone without itunes?



    not very corporate if you want to load a sales app for your sales force and you have to use the App Store to do it. one the blackberry you can load apps by packaging them into an executable



    Yes you can--and Apple's tools officially support doing so. Companies can create apps for internal use only, and bypass the iTunes Store. (This has been true since the beginning--it's an option you're presented with when you sign up as an iPhone developer.)



    Very corporate





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hezekiahb View Post


    I'm not sure I get why people like the BlackBerry better for e-mail. I have one & hate it, I think the interface is absolutely horrible.



    ...



    I tend to agree, but aside from "old habits die hard," email search is one huge reason I'm sure. (And a reason Apple has addressed with 3.0.)





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dagamer34 View Post


    The last one would probably require some type of file-system application, and that's not likely to be in 3.0. Maybe next year?



    I'd by happy just to see 3rd-party support for attachments from apps. Air Sharing gives me a useful file system--now let me email any one of those files And doing so from Office (which Microsoft hints is coming to iPhone) would be nice too. Meanwhile, my workaround is to have the attachments I commonly need to email sitting in my own inbox, where I can forward them at will.
  • Reply 12 of 272
    tenobelltenobell Posts: 7,014member
    You can currently attach and email pictures, HTML, and URL's. The iPhone doesn't have local storage but with copy/paste you can potentially save and attach most anything to an email.



    3.0 adds the ability for any app to have direct access to email. So potentially you can attach and email anything from any app that has direct access to email.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ulfoaf View Post




    Searching email

    cut and paste

    store and email attachments from the phone



    3.0 will take care of the first two, right? How about the ability to attach files?



  • Reply 13 of 272
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ulfoaf View Post


    Searching email

    cut and paste

    store and email attachments from the phone



    3.0 will take care of the first two, right? How about the ability to attach files?



    The iPhone software will make the first two available, but there are a few simple solutions to the last one. One of them is QuickOffice, which I use often. You just have to be willing to incorporate it into your work style. It allows you to upload files to your iPhone through wifi, or you can view your MobileMe iDisk (if you have an account, but it works either way). One of the many great things about having MobileMe...
  • Reply 14 of 272
    "We find the BlackBerry better for email and calendaring and the iPhone better for everything else,"



    I would agree with that, although I'd include memos, tasks, contacts, and anything else that requires a keyboard in that list. And for me, the 'everything else' is games and music.



    It all depends on where your priorities lie. My priorities are messaging and music, so I carry both a Blackberry Curve and an iPod Touch.
  • Reply 15 of 272
    rkevwillrkevwill Posts: 224member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hezekiahb View Post


    I'm not sure I get why people like the BlackBerry better for e-mail. I have one & hate it, I think the interface is absolutely horrible.



    I am in the IT department where I work & have gotten to work with iPhones quite a bit while setting them up with wifi & exchange. I can't wait for Snow Leopard as I hate Entourage. It'd be nice if I could switch from my BlackBerry to an iPhone.



    For me it isn't cool factor or the web capabilities. I just get sick of these apps that are so cluttered & difficult to use.



    Um......I find the above quote a bit hard to believe, or.....the person spends more time on the net and playing with apps, then doing emails. I (unfortunately) reply, send, etc, probably 25-30 emails on the phone a day. Many of these emails are fairly long. There is NO way I would want to use an iphone for these longer emails. (not to mention all the variety of attachments etc). I agree with the article. The blackberry is better for emails, the iphone everything else. Oh, I don't use a blackberry btw, I still use a treo 755p, but I sure plan on getting a 9630 eventually. And keeping my iPod Touch in my briefcase for playing, and surfing at hot spots. When the iphone gets a physical qwerty keyboard, and allows serious GPS apps with voice routing (like garmin) I would throw away everything else, and get one
  • Reply 16 of 272
    Go Apple Go. I'm in the "Corporate" environment and I can't wait to see an even balance of PC's vs. MAC's vs. iPhones and "other smart phones". Cost of ownership is so fricken high anyways cause all the pc's are taking craps all the time it would be nice to get something that is built well and last a long time.



    LanPhantom
  • Reply 17 of 272
    aaarrrggghaaarrrgggh Posts: 1,578member
    It pains me to say it, but Forrester gets it!



    This is really huge for the iPhone and Apple in general. Next thing you know, Forrester is going to recommend businesses consider heterogeneous desktop environments to maintain long-term computing flexibility!



    I can easily picture this one little research paper adding 2-3MM iPhone/iPod Touch units per year!
  • Reply 18 of 272
    monstrositymonstrosity Posts: 2,203member
    is there a limit on the number of devices you can install on for enterprise? (non app store?)
  • Reply 19 of 272
    aaarrrggghaaarrrgggh Posts: 1,578member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hezekiahb View Post


    I'm not sure I get why people like the BlackBerry better for e-mail. I have one & hate it, I think the interface is absolutely horrible.



    I was actually starting to think the same thing last week as I was searching for something on my co-worker's blackberry. I used to love the BB, as it was simple and easy to use with one hand. When they dropped the click wheel, you lost much of that function. The home screen is a complete mess...



    ...but, when it comes to typing anything more than one or two lines, the Blackberry still wins.



    The flip side of that argument is that you need to be very careful writing more than two lines when you are on the road and only putting half your attention into composition of a response. I just wish the iPhone made it easier to flag things for follow-up later.
  • Reply 20 of 272
    tenobelltenobell Posts: 7,014member
    That's a matter of opinion and what you are used to. I admit at this point my brain is wired for the iPhone. I recently tried typing on a friends BB, since their are two or three functions on every key, and the keys are a bit small for my fingers, I had a difficult time.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by aaarrrgggh View Post


    ...but, when it comes to typing anything more than one or two lines, the Blackberry still wins.

    .



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