Apple's Phil Schiller explains lack of NFC and inductive charging in iPhone 5

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
In an interview directly following Apple's unveiling of the iPhone 5, Senior Vice President of Worldwide Marketing Phil Schiller detailed why the company chose not to include NFC and wireless charging capabilities in the new handset, and goes over the significance of the new Lightning port.

Before the iPhone 5 debuted, there were back and forth reports (1, 2) regarding whether the new handset would implement near-field communication, the radio technology some companies use to facilitate eWallet transactions. Some speculated that Apple would incorporate NFC tech into its upcoming Passbook app, though the rumors were quashed at Wednesday's event.

Schiller
Apple SVP Phil Schiller


Schiller told All Things D that the decision not to include NFC actually stemmed from Passbook, which he said "does the kinds of things customer need today." The app, which organizes digital tickets, coupons and more, will roll out with iOS 6 on Sept. 19.

On the inductive charging front, Schiller pointed out the perceived convenience of such systems are questionable given they too need to be plugged into an outlet. The USB interface, however, can be plugged into walls, computers and airplanes.

?Having to create another device you have to plug into the wall is actually, for most situations, more complicated,? Schiller said.

Extending the discussion of dock connectors, Schiller explained that the Lightning port was a necessity in launching the new iPhone 5 and iPods. He said it wasn't possible to build such thin products without changing the connector from the 30-pin design first introduced in 2003.

?This is the new connector for many years to come,? Schiller said.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 105


    I told you there would be no NFC!

  • Reply 2 of 105


    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

    "This is the new connector for many years to come," Schiller said.


     


    Fast forward to September 2013 on AI… 


     


    "WHY IS IT STILL THE LIGHTNING PORT?! THIS IS SO STALE. SAME PHONE AS LAST YEAR."

  • Reply 3 of 105
    The real issue with NFC is that there is no one standardized form yet. Makes including it a total pain in the ass.
  • Reply 4 of 105


    NFC is the next e-SATA.

  • Reply 5 of 105


    Someone correct me if I'm wrong but isn't inductive charging either slower or more power "leaky" than the classic cable? And isn't it only worth it if you have a large induction pad that could potentially charge multiple mobile devices set on it at one time (so only one power pad plugged into the wall compared with two or more devices).

  • Reply 6 of 105
    In an interview directly following Apple's unveiling of the iPhone 5, Senior Vice President of Worldwide Marketing Phil Schiller ... goes over the significance of the new Lightning port.

    The main significance of the new port is that you an no longer connect your iPhone to a TV set, and there is no longer line-level audio for high-quality connection to a stereo.
  • Reply 7 of 105
    great phone!
  • Reply 8 of 105
    S let me get this straight--the iPhone does not have NFC because Apple says we don't need it. Personally, I don't care about NFC. The explanation, at least as it was reported here, was circular.

    Induction charging, on the other hand, is really convenient.
  • Reply 9 of 105

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by silverpraxis View Post


    Someone correct me if I'm wrong but isn't inductive charging either slower or more power "leaky" than the classic cable? And isn't it only worth it if you have a large induction pad that could potentially charge multiple mobile devices set on it at one time (so only one power pad plugged into the wall compared with two or more devices).



     






    Your right, inductive charging is VERY slow, and draws more power than it can transfer to the device. A classic one is both electric toothbrushes, they are inductive. They take about 24 hours to fully charge, and they consume more power than they transfer to the battery. Having one big pad, that you could put a phone, iDevice on would be good (for overnight charging).

  • Reply 10 of 105
    Someone correct me if I'm wrong but isn't inductive charging either slower or more power "leaky" than the classic cable? And isn't it only worth it if you have a large induction pad that could potentially charge multiple mobile devices set on it at one time (so only one power pad plugged into the wall compared with two or more devices).

    May have alrdy been said. But you are right.
    I know it's slower and as an engineerig student, I know that everytime energy changes form, you lose energy.
    I would bet it takes a least 3 times the power to charge a phone wirelessly.


    I prayed apple would not include that cause u have to buy a 100 dollar charging pad and it's just a waste.
    The new connector that connects either way is much better
  • Reply 11 of 105
    tylerk36tylerk36 Posts: 1,037member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


     


    Fast forward to September 2013 on AI… 


     


    "WHY IS IT STILL THE LIGHTNING PORT?! THIS IS SO STALE. SAME PHONE AS LAST YEAR."



    Honestly the iPhone 5 is the last iPhone Apple will ever release.  December 21st is the end of all things as we know it in this planet.  So buy one and enjoy it without NFC because it wont matter.  LOL.

  • Reply 12 of 105


    It’s not clear that NFC is the solution to any current problem, Schiller said. "Passbook does the kinds of things customers need today."



    As for wireless charging, Schiller notes that the wireless charging systems still have to be plugged into the wall, so it’s not clear how much convenience they add. The widely-adopted USB cord, meanwhile, can charge in wall outlets, computers and even on airplanes, he said.



    "Having to create another device you have to plug into the wall is actually, for most situations, more complicated," Schiller said.


     


     


     


    Yep.

  • Reply 13 of 105
    richlrichl Posts: 2,213member


    I'm sure that in 10 years time phones would have any ports on them - everything will be done wirelessly. Port and connectors are easily damaged and a good route for moisture to get into the device. We're not at this point yet though.


     


    Does anyone know if the new iDevices are USB 3.0 compatible or not? 

  • Reply 14 of 105
    I'm outraged. Where's my kitchen sink?
  • Reply 15 of 105
    Re: Inductive charging

    I don't see how another gadget plugged into the wall that charges much slower can be "convenient". If there is an advantage that I'm ignorant about, maybe I would change my mind.
  • Reply 16 of 105


    Originally Posted by tylerk36 View Post

    December 21st is the end of all things as we know it in this planet.


     


    "I WISH YELLOWSTONE WOULD HAVE ERUPTED MORE VIOLENTLY."


     


    "IS THAT IT? ONLY FOUR BILLION DEAD?"


     


    "PSHH, THE POLES SHIFTED MORE THAN THAT LAST YEAR."

  • Reply 17 of 105

    While I'm positive on inductive charging, I realized that it's not that convenient afterall. I often use my iPhone while it's recharging. So it's really a hassle to use while it's charging. Plus I still have to keep extra cables
  • Reply 18 of 105

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


     


    "I WISH YELLOWSTONE WOULD HAVE ERUPTED MORE VIOLENTLY."


     


    "IS THAT IT? ONLY FOUR BILLION DEAD?"


     


    "PSHH, THE POLES SHIFTED MORE THAN THAT LAST YEAR."



    Violently is ok...but I'd really rather the eruptions went higher into the sky. 4.3 - 4.5 miles seems reasonable rather than the measly 3.5 we've had to deal with for a while now. 

  • Reply 19 of 105
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 6,099member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by msuberly View Post



    S let me get this straight--the iPhone does not have NFC because Apple says we don't need it. Personally, I don't care about NFC. The explanation, at least as it was reported here, was circular.

    Induction charging, on the other hand, is really convenient.


     


    Inductive charging is a solution in search of a problem.  Yes, in theory it's nice to just drop your device on a charge-pad and walk away.  But something still needs to be plugged into a wall.  What if I want to charge my phone at home and at the office?  Buy two pads?  Oh wait, I'm not near a wall outlet to plug my pad in.  Out of luck.  Plus it takes a huge amount of time to charge a device this way.  



    Regular cables though can be plugged into an outlet, a computer, another adapter, and so forth.



    I just don't get the fixation on this.

  • Reply 20 of 105
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,377member
    The other bad thing with inductive charing is that you need a magnetic structure in the iPhone to couple that energy. A coil or whatever just adds bulk.
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