First look: Apple's bionic iPhone X with Face ID

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  • Reply 121 of 153

    larryjw said:
    I would agree that including the 5w charger seems a little silly.  Apple packs in so much incredible technology into this device - including rapid charging and wireless charging - and rightfully calls it he iPhone of the future, and yet packages it with a pitiful charging system that was included in the very first iPhone 10 years ago.  

    I guess its similar to the Airpods.  The tech is built into the device, but you have to spend an incredible amount of money to use it. 
    I attach zero importance to the 5W charger. That might be an issue for first time Apple buyers, but everyone else has a drawer filled with Apple chargers. Apple put a minimal charger in because they know anything more is unnecessary. 
    There’s a reason Apple is the most profitable companies in the world. This is one of them. iPad Pro ships with 12W charger which is a complete joke. But that way Apple gets people to buy a USB-C adapter and lightning to USB-C cable which is more $$ for them. 
    Or, more likely, people don’t care. I have the pro and I certainly don’t care. I use my existing wall chargers throughout the house, and have no intention to change it up by buying a new laptop charger just to get it a little faster. Usually I charge when not using it anyway. 

    Normals don’t obsess on this shit the way techies and bloggers do. That’s a fact. 
    williamlondondewmelkruppwatto_cobrapaisleydiscobaconstangadonissmupscooter63
  • Reply 122 of 153

    larryjw said:
    I would agree that including the 5w charger seems a little silly.  Apple packs in so much incredible technology into this device - including rapid charging and wireless charging - and rightfully calls it he iPhone of the future, and yet packages it with a pitiful charging system that was included in the very first iPhone 10 years ago.  

    I guess its similar to the Airpods.  The tech is built into the device, but you have to spend an incredible amount of money to use it. 
    I attach zero importance to the 5W charger. That might be an issue for first time Apple buyers, but everyone else has a drawer filled with Apple chargers. Apple put a minimal charger in because they know anything more is unnecessary. 
    There’s a reason Apple is the most profitable companies in the world. This is one of them. iPad Pro ships with 12W charger which is a complete joke. But that way Apple gets people to buy a USB-C adapter and lightning to USB-C cable which is more $$ for them. 
    Or, more likely, people don’t care. I have the pro and I certainly don’t care. I use my existing wall chargers throughout the house, and have no intention to change it up by buying a new laptop charger just to get it a little faster. Usually I charge when not using it anyway. 

    Normals don’t obsess on this shit the way techies and bloggers do. That’s a fact. 
    It’s way more than a little faster. There’s no excuse for Apple not to ship a MacBook charger with the iPad Pro. Most people don’t obsess over it because they know any better. But if they had a 29W charger no way in hell would they ever go back to the 12W charger.
  • Reply 123 of 153

    larryjw said:
    I would agree that including the 5w charger seems a little silly.  Apple packs in so much incredible technology into this device - including rapid charging and wireless charging - and rightfully calls it he iPhone of the future, and yet packages it with a pitiful charging system that was included in the very first iPhone 10 years ago.  

    I guess its similar to the Airpods.  The tech is built into the device, but you have to spend an incredible amount of money to use it. 
    I attach zero importance to the 5W charger. That might be an issue for first time Apple buyers, but everyone else has a drawer filled with Apple chargers. Apple put a minimal charger in because they know anything more is unnecessary. 
    There’s a reason Apple is the most profitable companies in the world. This is one of them. iPad Pro ships with 12W charger which is a complete joke. But that way Apple gets people to buy a USB-C adapter and lightning to USB-C cable which is more $$ for them. 
    Normals don’t obsess on this shit the way techies and bloggers do. That’s a fact. 
    My mother has been using a 12.9” iPad Pro since June.  She has yet to complain how long it takes to charge. I’m positive she doesn’t know there is a faster method for charging it available over what came in the box and she may not even realize it takes longer with her 5W iPhone charger.
    edited November 2017 StrangeDaysbb-15pscooter63watto_cobra
  • Reply 124 of 153
    SoliSoli Posts: 9,173member

    larryjw said:
    I would agree that including the 5w charger seems a little silly.  Apple packs in so much incredible technology into this device - including rapid charging and wireless charging - and rightfully calls it he iPhone of the future, and yet packages it with a pitiful charging system that was included in the very first iPhone 10 years ago.  

    I guess its similar to the Airpods.  The tech is built into the device, but you have to spend an incredible amount of money to use it. 
    I attach zero importance to the 5W charger. That might be an issue for first time Apple buyers, but everyone else has a drawer filled with Apple chargers. Apple put a minimal charger in because they know anything more is unnecessary. 
    There’s a reason Apple is the most profitable companies in the world. This is one of them. iPad Pro ships with 12W charger which is a complete joke. But that way Apple gets people to buy a USB-C adapter and lightning to USB-C cable which is more $$ for them. 
    Or, more likely, people don’t care. I have the pro and I certainly don’t care. I use my existing wall chargers throughout the house, and have no intention to change it up by buying a new laptop charger just to get it a little faster. Usually I charge when not using it anyway. 

    Normals don’t obsess on this shit the way techies and bloggers do. That’s a fact. 
    It’s way more than a little faster. There’s no excuse for Apple not to ship a MacBook charger with the iPad Pro. Most people don’t obsess over it because they know any better. But if they had a 29W charger no way in hell would they ever go back to the 12W charger.
    That's a ridiculous statement. A reasonable person would request that Apple include a USB-C PSU and USB-C/USB 3.x Lightning cable that will allow for the fastest possible charging for the iPad Pro, but instead you want them to include a much more powerful one that was designed for the 12" MacBook. :\
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 125 of 153
    To pay, you double tap the side button, similar to Apple Watch.

    This strikes me as a real step backward.

    Right now I keep my phone in my left shirt pocket, facing in, with the button at the top.

    To use APay, I simply reach up with with my right hand and grasp the end, with my thumb on the button. As I place it on the reader, this naturally "flips" the phone face up while also authenticating. It's one single motion.

    This is especially important because I have found most readers have some sort of plastic or rubbery C-shaped "cup" around the number buttons that are below the display area in order stop people from seeing you type in a PIN. These interfere with the placement of the phone, which I normally have to rotate so it's sideways on the reader.

    Now it appears I will have to hold the phone in such a way that I can double click the buttons, and while it can see my face. I'm a bit concerned that this will make it more difficult to use in this case, although only time will tell.
    williamlondonbaconstang
  • Reply 126 of 153
    Soli said:
    Soli said:
    It's not a dramatic rethinking. It's an iPhone 8 with a no bezels and face ID.
    Can you explain that statement?
    Sure! It's an iPhone 8 with a no bezels and face ID, like I said.
    No, it's not. Not even close.
    It's got the same glass back, it's got the same camera except placed vertically, it's got the same amount of RAM and the same processor.
    But it’s not the same camera, the X is half a stop brighter and has OIS on the telephoto lens as well, both unlike the 8. And it has a different sized screen, different screen technology, different screen features such as TrueTone, different front cameras w/ TrueDepth capable of doing computational photography involving depth and FX layering, etc. And that’s just the hardware — with Face ID on the X the usage changes, and we now have “contextual computing”:

    “One prominent example is that notifications of text messages and from apps are now set to “private” by default. This means you’ll see the app from which the notification came, but not the content of the notification. This was always an option but now you get the added benefit of them being private by default until you look at the device. Once it sees that it’s you looking at it, the messages expand to show you the private content. It’s super cool. A way to balance privacy and convenience based on context and identity.

    “Another is the password auto-fill function on websites. With Face ID on, simply open a website or an app that you have a saved password in Keychain for and it will pop the Face ID logo and auto-enter your information. Tap log in and go. Once you see this in action for the first time you’ll never ever want to be without it. If an app requires a password for entry it will even auto log-in for you, creating a smooth transition between opening, authentication and using an app. It’s huge for developers of banking apps, password keepers, financial apps and anything else that requires authentication to protect sensitive data.”

     
    https://techcrunch.com/2017/10/31/review-the-iphone-x-goes-to-disneyland/

    Thus, not the same. Troll on, bro.
    edited November 2017 williamlondonpscooter63patchythepiratewatto_cobrapaisleydisco
  • Reply 127 of 153

    larryjw said:
    I would agree that including the 5w charger seems a little silly.  Apple packs in so much incredible technology into this device - including rapid charging and wireless charging - and rightfully calls it he iPhone of the future, and yet packages it with a pitiful charging system that was included in the very first iPhone 10 years ago.  

    I guess its similar to the Airpods.  The tech is built into the device, but you have to spend an incredible amount of money to use it. 
    I attach zero importance to the 5W charger. That might be an issue for first time Apple buyers, but everyone else has a drawer filled with Apple chargers. Apple put a minimal charger in because they know anything more is unnecessary. 
    There’s a reason Apple is the most profitable companies in the world. This is one of them. iPad Pro ships with 12W charger which is a complete joke. But that way Apple gets people to buy a USB-C adapter and lightning to USB-C cable which is more $$ for them. 
    Or, more likely, people don’t care. I have the pro and I certainly don’t care. I use my existing wall chargers throughout the house, and have no intention to change it up by buying a new laptop charger just to get it a little faster. Usually I charge when not using it anyway. 

    Normals don’t obsess on this shit the way techies and bloggers do. That’s a fact. 
    It’s way more than a little faster. There’s no excuse for Apple not to ship a MacBook charger with the iPad Pro. Most people don’t obsess over it because they know any better. But if they had a 29W charger no way in hell would they ever go back to the 12W charger.
    I have USB cables tactically placed throughout the house, in addition to a couple of computers with cables. I'm certainly not unique in this. Do you really believe we would upgrade all of our charging points? Of course not. So even if I got another 29W, it's just one more wall wart, the others would still be slower. Just doesn't really matter to me, and I suspect to most. Regular people don't obsess about chasing specs the way you do.
    pscooter63watto_cobra
  • Reply 128 of 153
    SoliSoli Posts: 9,173member
    > To pay, you double tap the side button, similar to Apple Watch.

    This strikes me as a real step backward.

    Right now I keep my phone in my left shirt pocket, facing in, with the button at the top.

    To use APay, I simply reach up with with my right hand and grasp the end, with my thumb on the button. As I place it on the reader, this naturally "flips" the phone face up while also authenticating. It's one single motion.

    This is especially important because I have found most readers have some sort of plastic or rubbery C-shaped "cup" around the number buttons that are below the display area in order stop people from seeing you type in a PIN. These interfere with the placement of the phone, which I normally have to rotate so it's sideways on the reader.

    Now it appears I will have to hold the phone in such a way that I can double click the buttons, and while it can see my face. I'm a bit concerned that this will make it more difficult to use in this case, although only time will tell.
    I see your point, but this might be welcome to many as one of the common complaints I hear from people with Apple Pay is that end up paying with the wrong card because Touch ID is so fast. On this forum in the last couple weeks I had a discussion with someone that prefers their Apple Watch because they can do the more deliberate action of pressing the side button twice to activate Apple Pay.
    StrangeDaysmaury markowitzwatto_cobra
  • Reply 129 of 153

    > To pay, you double tap the side button, similar to Apple Watch.

    This strikes me as a real step backward.

    Right now I keep my phone in my left shirt pocket, facing in, with the button at the top.

    To use APay, I simply reach up with with my right hand and grasp the end, with my thumb on the button. As I place it on the reader, this naturally "flips" the phone face up while also authenticating. It's one single motion.

    This is especially important because I have found most readers have some sort of plastic or rubbery C-shaped "cup" around the number buttons that are below the display area in order stop people from seeing you type in a PIN. These interfere with the placement of the phone, which I normally have to rotate so it's sideways on the reader.

    Now it appears I will have to hold the phone in such a way that I can double click the buttons, and while it can see my face. I'm a bit concerned that this will make it more difficult to use in this case, although only time will tell.
    I'm certain nobody will remember this absurd level of OCD obsessing about the efficiency of their phone-gripping-motions a year from now. All your concern will just...fade away....to the place where the concern about thieves chopping off your fingers went. Or thieves snatching your AirPods from your ears. Or...
    williamlondonpscooter63watto_cobra
  • Reply 130 of 153
    bb-15bb-15 Posts: 264member
    mr. h said:
    larryjw said:
    I attach zero importance to the 5W charger. That might be an issue for first time Apple buyers, but everyone else has a drawer filled with Apple chargers. Apple put a minimal charger in because they know anything more is unnecessary. 
    This makes no sense. Having a drawer full of Apple chargers doesn't make your new 5 W charger charge the iPhone X any faster.

    The point is, the iPhone X can be charged at a much faster rate than the included 5 W adaptor is capable of. For very little incremental cost (to Apple), Apple could include a more powerful charger. Given the high retail price of the iPhone X, I agree that it just seems mean-spirited of Apple to not include a more powerful adaptor.
    It’s not actually much faster. Gruber timed the 8 with the 29-watt charged compared to the iphone 7 without fast charging. At thirty minutes the fast charging was 54% charged while the iphone 7 had it at 43%. That’s nothing to get excited about. 

    https://daringfireball.net/2017/09/the_iphones_8
    Reviewing all the complaints about this; 
    1. Apple including the 5W charger with the iPhone X was considered a flaw in the First Look article. 
    - While some claim an extreme pro Apple bias in the article; this criticism of Apple in the article shows no evidence of that.
    - I agree that selling the 5W charger with the iPhone X was an oversight on Apple's part. 
    2. Should a person pay for and use the 29-watt Apple charger for the iPhone X? I wouldn't.
    Tests (from AppleInsider & BGR) have shown that the very common 12W iPad charger is very close to the 29W charger in terms of speed. (The 12W iPad charger is also much cheaper.)

    http://appleinsider.com/articles/17/10/02/comparing-iphone-8-charging-speeds-with-fast-charge-wireless-and-more

    http://bgr.com/2017/10/10/iphone-8-charging-speeds-fast-charging-iphone-x/

    I've got extra 12W iPad chargers. Those are the ones I would use when I eventually get an iPhone X (or XI) later next year.  
    edited November 2017 watto_cobra
  • Reply 131 of 153
    mr. hmr. h Posts: 4,737member
    mr. h said:
    larryjw said:
    I attach zero importance to the 5W charger. That might be an issue for first time Apple buyers, but everyone else has a drawer filled with Apple chargers. Apple put a minimal charger in because they know anything more is unnecessary. 
    This makes no sense. Having a drawer full of Apple chargers doesn't make your new 5 W charger charge the iPhone X any faster.

    The point is, the iPhone X can be charged at a much faster rate than the included 5 W adaptor is capable of. For very little incremental cost (to Apple), Apple could include a more powerful charger. Given the high retail price of the iPhone X, I agree that it just seems mean-spirited of Apple to not include a more powerful adaptor.
    It’s not actually much faster. Gruber timed the 8 with the 29-watt charged compared to the iphone 7 without fast charging. At thirty minutes the fast charging was 54% charged while the iphone 7 had it at 43%. That’s nothing to get excited about. 

    https://daringfireball.net/2017/09/the_iphones_8
    Oh. Thanks for the info.

    Why is the "fast charge" of the iPhone 8 so slow? Or is it that the "slow" charge of the iPhone 7 is actually quite quick?
  • Reply 132 of 153
    Using terms like that makes you appear to be a troll.
    Even just a cursory look at my posting history would have dispelled that notion. My motivation was not to just strip up shit -- I think people who derive enjoyment from that are sociopathic -- but to encourage writing that is less congratulatory and more evaluative.

    [...] DED isn’t a zealot, he’s a columnist and he backs up his conclusions with reasoning and facts.
    In my opinion, Mr. Dilger backs up his conclusions with facts the same way a corporate communications or political spokesperson does. He seems to begin with the conclusion then constructs the factual argument to support the premise. One doesn't have to dislike Apple to question fawning praise that dismisses and derides alternative viewpoints and preferences. I like Apple, and usually even agree with Mr. Dilger's assessments. I'm just suspicious of any commentary that doesn't allow for the existence of valid use cases outside Apple's design and that tries to pre-emptively quiet differing views.

    [...] This upsets those who struggle with reasoning, fatcs, and the conclusion that Apple’s products are usually better. 
    Actually, in my case, it's upsetting because the reasoning and facts are limited to supporting the thesis that Apple's way is always the right way. It's tacitly insulting to anyone with other ideas. I agree that Apple's products are usually better than alternatives, but:

    1. Sometimes they're not. From time to time, someone else makes something that's better than what Apple offers. Recognizing and acknowledging those cases provides users with information that may better guide their choices and provide feedback to Apple.

    2. As you've pointed out yourself, design decisions are rarely "right" or "wrong." There are usually many variables that have to be considered, and despite the best intentions and efforts of the designers, some of those choices are going to conflict with the way some users like to work. The fact that the choice was made by Apple does not make it unassailable or render those considerations invalid.

    3. Starting from a presumption of Apple's infallibility makes it impossible to imagine ways they could be even better. If a problem (or, let's call it an "imperfection") is discussed openly, positive thinkers will come up with a solution. When any viewpoint that isn't on-board with Apple's approach is considered heretical the path to improvement is closed.

    [...] Your “calling him out” just demonstrates that you struggle with these things, and or the job of a columnist. 
    I'm not a journalist myself, but I do work among them. Much of what I've written here is based on my observations of what they do. But perhaps there's a difference between a journalist and a columnist? Maybe objectivity isn't in DED's job description.

    Anyway, bottom line, my objection to praise prose isn't based on disliking Apple or lack of reasoning. Just the opposite. I like Apple a lot, and I know from experience that some of its products have imperfections, in the form of both features that appear to be wildly divisive and some "unexpected behaviours." Basic reasoning tells us that there are no absolutes. I don't expect or want articles that focus on flaws, but when article after article dismisses any notion of there ever being a problem or equally valid alternative approaches, I stop taking the author seriously. That's all.
    maury markowitzwilliamlondon
  • Reply 133 of 153
    Soli said:
    I see your point, but this might be welcome to many as one of the common complaints I hear from people with Apple Pay is that end up paying with the wrong card because Touch ID is so fast. On this forum in the last couple weeks I had a discussion with someone that prefers their Apple Watch because they can do the more deliberate action of pressing the side button twice to activate Apple Pay.
    Ha! Fair point, I only have one card so this use-case doesn't effect me.
    patchythepiratewatto_cobrabaconstang
  • Reply 134 of 153
    GG1GG1 Posts: 265member
    bb-15 said:
    mr. h said:
    larryjw said:
    I attach zero importance to the 5W charger. That might be an issue for first time Apple buyers, but everyone else has a drawer filled with Apple chargers. Apple put a minimal charger in because they know anything more is unnecessary. 
    This makes no sense. Having a drawer full of Apple chargers doesn't make your new 5 W charger charge the iPhone X any faster.

    The point is, the iPhone X can be charged at a much faster rate than the included 5 W adaptor is capable of. For very little incremental cost (to Apple), Apple could include a more powerful charger. Given the high retail price of the iPhone X, I agree that it just seems mean-spirited of Apple to not include a more powerful adaptor.
    It’s not actually much faster. Gruber timed the 8 with the 29-watt charged compared to the iphone 7 without fast charging. At thirty minutes the fast charging was 54% charged while the iphone 7 had it at 43%. That’s nothing to get excited about. 

    https://daringfireball.net/2017/09/the_iphones_8
    Reviewing all the complaints about this; 
    1. Apple including the 5W charger with the iPhone X was considered a flaw in the First Look article. 
    - While some claim an extreme pro Apple bias in the article; this criticism of Apple in the article shows no evidence of that.
    - I agree that selling the 5W charger with the iPhone X was an oversight on Apple's part. 
    2. Should a person pay for and use the 29-watt Apple charger for the iPhone X? I wouldn't.
    Tests (from AppleInsider & BGR) have shown that the very common 12W iPad charger is very close to the 29W charger in terms of speed. (The 12W iPad charger is also much cheaper.)

    http://appleinsider.com/articles/17/10/02/comparing-iphone-8-charging-speeds-with-fast-charge-wireless-and-more

    http://bgr.com/2017/10/10/iphone-8-charging-speeds-fast-charging-iphone-x/

    I've got extra 12W iPad chargers. Those are the ones I would use when I eventually get an iPhone X (or XI) later next year.  
    I use the Griffin Power Block (2.1 amps/11W) charger, and it charges noticeably faster than the 5 watter (I didn't do any timing comparisons).

    And now you say (or someone says) that the 12 watter's charging time is close to the 29 watter, so we can reasonably estimate that Apple limit the max charging current to a bit over 2 amps. I picked the Griffin so I can carry one charger for both iPhone and iPad when traveling internationally, and it works great.

    Apple (as well as others) limit the max charging current to protect the battery from heat buildup (bad things happen with heat, such as swelling batteries or explosion), so even if you have a 100W charger, your phone won't be able to take advantage of the higher available power.

    Edit: removed reference to Amazon pricing.
    edited November 2017 bb-15watto_cobra
  • Reply 135 of 153
    bb-15bb-15 Posts: 264member
    Using terms like that makes you appear to be a troll.
    Even just a cursory look at my posting history would have dispelled that notion. My motivation was not to just strip up shit -- I think people who derive enjoyment from that are sociopathic -- but to encourage writing that is less congratulatory and more evaluative.

    [...] DED isn’t a zealot, he’s a columnist and he backs up his conclusions with reasoning and facts.
    In my opinion, Mr. Dilger backs up his conclusions with facts the same way a corporate communications or political spokesperson does. He seems to begin with the conclusion then constructs the factual argument to support the premise. One doesn't have to dislike Apple to question fawning praise that dismisses and derides alternative viewpoints and preferences. I like Apple, and usually even agree with Mr. Dilger's assessments. I'm just suspicious of any commentary that doesn't allow for the existence of valid use cases outside Apple's design and that tries to pre-emptively quiet differing views.

    [...] This upsets those who struggle with reasoning, fatcs, and the conclusion that Apple’s products are usually better. 
    Actually, in my case, it's upsetting because the reasoning and facts are limited to supporting the thesis that Apple's way is always the right way. It's tacitly insulting to anyone with other ideas. I agree that Apple's products are usually better than alternatives, but:

    1. Sometimes they're not. From time to time, someone else makes something that's better than what Apple offers. Recognizing and acknowledging those cases provides users with information that may better guide their choices and provide feedback to Apple.

    2. As you've pointed out yourself, design decisions are rarely "right" or "wrong." There are usually many variables that have to be considered, and despite the best intentions and efforts of the designers, some of those choices are going to conflict with the way some users like to work. The fact that the choice was made by Apple does not make it unassailable or render those considerations invalid.

    3. Starting from a presumption of Apple's infallibility makes it impossible to imagine ways they could be even better. If a problem (or, let's call it an "imperfection") is discussed openly, positive thinkers will come up with a solution. When any viewpoint that isn't on-board with Apple's approach is considered heretical the path to improvement is closed.

    [...] Your “calling him out” just demonstrates that you struggle with these things, and or the job of a columnist. 
    I'm not a journalist myself, but I do work among them. Much of what I've written here is based on my observations of what they do. But perhaps there's a difference between a journalist and a columnist? Maybe objectivity isn't in DED's job description.

    Anyway, bottom line, my objection to praise prose isn't based on disliking Apple or lack of reasoning. Just the opposite. I like Apple a lot, and I know from experience that some of its products have imperfections, in the form of both features that appear to be wildly divisive and some "unexpected behaviours." Basic reasoning tells us that there are no absolutes. I don't expect or want articles that focus on flaws, but when article after article dismisses any notion of there ever being a problem or equally valid alternative approaches, I stop taking the author seriously. That's all.
    You claim that the First Look article "dismisses any notion of there ever being a problem". 
    This is simply not true. 

    From the article;

    "with Face ID,... It does however, require some significant adjustments… 

    The worst part of the unboxing is that iPhone X still only ships with an inadequate 5-watt USB charger, even though the new phone supports Qi wireless charging and USB-PD Fast Charging. Actually using either one requires some additional purchases… 

    One potential disadvantage over Touch ID is that you can't share a device (some couples apparently configure a shared device using each of their fingerprints); Face ID is designed to work with one person."

    * You do not focus on details in this thread and instead made sweeping generalizations. And what you are pushing for in your final premise is that there are equally valid approaches to Apple's ecosystem. That works for your preferences of course. 

    - However, what you fail to realize is that techies come with their own different preferences. Certain websites from Android Central, to ZDNet, to Apple Insider cater to tech audiences which have particular preferences of one platform over another. 

    Since you have different preferences, you dismiss the descriptions of the iPhone X in the First Look article. That's your privilege. But I do not dismiss those descriptions because my tech preferences are in line with this site. 

    * I have decades of experience with tech and have trained over 500 people to use personal computers in various settings. For my preferences what Google and Microsoft have been doing over 10 years with smaller portable tech has not been an "equally valid alternative" to what Apple has done. Again that conclusion applies just for me.  

    - I do not believe that the Pixel 2XL, touted by many experts as the best Android phone, is as good as the iPhone X. Overall, I do not prefer Google's ecosystem in terms of how it handles data or consider it to be equally valid. 

    - I also don't think that what Microsoft has ended up with mobile tech tablets is as good as a basic iPad for casual computing. I don't see Windows 10 as an equally valid approach in that casual mobile sector. 

    * So from my POV, you have not stated some grand infallible truth. Instead what you have done is come to an Apple centric website and have complained that people here prefer Apple products and that they enjoy reading articles which highlight the strengths of Apple products. I think that a tech site named Apple Insider would give a clue to the preferences of its readership. 

    edited November 2017 williamlondon
  • Reply 136 of 153
    Soli said:
    asdasd said:
    Great early review. Agree about the disappointment of fast OR wireless charger not being included in the box. Would have also been nice to have AirPods included with the purchase as well. 
    you mean to wipe out their margins? I mean thats $300 worth of merchandise you want for free. 
    Nah, customers want the starting price for the 64GB model to be $1249¡ (I subtracted $50 for not having to include the smaller PSU, the slower cable, and the Lightning EarPods.)
    AirPods for free is kinda crazy, but a 5-watt charger is an insult. It doesn't cost them that much to provide a fast-charger. I got a fast-charger with the Samsung S7 (which I only use for development purposes) and it's probably less than $1 extra to include that thing.
    williamlondonbaconstang
  • Reply 137 of 153
    Soli said:
    Soli said:
    mubaili said:
    Any scoop why Gruber got the snub? but congrats on moving up the Apple ladder. Looking forward to a in deep bashing on Android phones.
    mubaili said:
    Any scoop why Gruber got the snub? but congrats on moving up the Apple ladder. Looking forward to a in deep bashing on Android phones.
    Just checked his site. :o Not sure if he’s just being sarcastic or really didn’t get a review unit and is pissed about it. Casey Liss wrote a blog post giving his thoughts on Apple’s reasoning around X reviews.

    https://one37.net/blog/31/10/2017/pr

    There are a few things Gruber has complained about recently like the MacBook/Macbook Pro keyboards and he didn’t mince any words on his dislike of the notch (called it gross) so maybe this is Apple showing their displeasure.
    Gruber did get a review unit. He stated that he's only had less than 24 hours with it so he can't post his own detailed review at this time. He also noted that many longtime reviewers were only given a day to use the device before the embargo was lifted.
    Oh boo hoo.
    It's a statement of fact, not a reason for you to make a petty remark about a blogger you don't know. I guess I was wrong in thinking you'd want an answer to @mubaili ;'s query.
    I’m saying boo hoo to the snarkiness from Gruber (and others) that the ‘right’ people or usual suspects didn’t get review units or that Apple didn’t follow their typical policy. He tries to walk it back on his podcast but the snark is still up on his website. I do, however, agree with him that not enough people got extended time with the phone to do a proper review. I believe only 3 outlets in the US had more than 24 hours with the phone. I don’t understand that logic. The two major things with this phone - Face ID and the loss of the home button and remapping all those actions - is that really something you can comment on well in less than 24 hours? With some of these UI and gesture changes my guess is ones first impression would be worse than after they’ve used these gestures for a week or so, and had a chance to start to retrain their muscle memory. So no I don’t get the logic behind so many only have 24 hours or less with the phone before the embargo was lifted.
    A couple thoughts on this:
    -Actually, giving mainstream publications (with mainstream audiences) first full access make sense, followed a week or less later by the more specific blogs that will drill down in more detail.
    -Maybe there aren't that many mainstream publications that don't publish absurd FUD on a regular basis? For example, I don't see why Apple would want to reward the a holes at bloomberg, NYT, forbes, etc. Even WSJ published an article about 'how to trick Face ID'.

    Also, I still think macrumors and 9to5 should not be allowed to attend Apple events for a while after the needless and incredibly selfish spoiler stunt they pulled. I havn't revisited those sites since the event.
    pscooter63watto_cobrapaisleydiscomontrosemacs
  • Reply 138 of 153
    kevin keekevin kee Posts: 1,046member
    It's not a dramatic rethinking. It's an iPhone 8 with a no bezels and face ID.
    There are literally thousands of changes just to make it no bezels and faceID. What you see on the surface is the result of many changes underneath.
    watto_cobraSoli
  • Reply 139 of 153
    Hi all, new member here and long time reader of this site :)

    I have a question maybe somebody could answer regarding this iPhone and its facial recognition - after the recognition is confirmed, is there any further security step (Pin code etc) that needs to be performed ? Or does the face recognition itself unlock the phone ?

    Thanks.
    watto_cobrapscooter63
  • Reply 140 of 153


    Also, I still think macrumors and 9to5 should not be allowed to attend Apple events for a while after the needless and incredibly selfish spoiler stunt they pulled. I havn't revisited those sites since the event.

    this!
    lkrupppatchythepirate
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