Ballmer: Microsoft's brand 'means something' to users]

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  • Reply 161 of 218
    applappl Posts: 348member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cincytee View Post


    I think Ina's tag line says it pretty well: During her years at CNET News, Ina Fried has changed beats several times, changed genders once, and covered both of the Pirates of Silicon Valley. These days, most of her attention is focused on Microsoft.



    Probably shouldn't spout off stupid crap when you haven't bothered to check out the information.



    I've read her stuff since back when she was a he. She's a first-class reporter. Always has been. One of the few I pay attention to.
  • Reply 162 of 218
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jkgm View Post


    You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.



    ** WIN!!! **
  • Reply 163 of 218
    applappl Posts: 348member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Zaphodsplanet View Post


    Okay, I'm sorry but WHAT IN THE HELL is up with the dude interviewing Ballmer. Looks like he's wearing a sweater he took out of his sisters closet, then stole his grandmothers glasses....



    Or are we all supposed to pretend he's a girl? And that freaking girl hairstyle..... which he doesn't pull off at all.... is he also wearing a bra?



    Is this an idiot who can't accept he was born with a Penis? As for the MS phone..... Lame as always..... I'd be surprised if Gates throws out Ballmer though. He's such an incredible dork that he actually makes Gates look slightly less dorky.



    I'm sorry... I still can't get over the CNET interviewer..... Gag!







    Upon retirement from the NLGJA National Board at the 2008 NLGJA national convention in Washington, DC, Fried was honored with both a Distinguished Service Award and a Women's Distinguished Service Award.[5]

    Journalism awards:

    Three time winner of NewsBios/TJFR award: NewsBios/TJFR "30 Most Influential Business Journalists Under 30."[6][7][8]

    Western Publications Association for Outstanding Editorial Content's Maggie Award.[9]

    Society of Professional Journalists (Northern California Chapter) Excellence in Journalism Award Winner: 2005 Breaking News (shared), 2005 Feature Writing.[10][11]

    Society of Professional Journalists' 2003 Sigma Delta Chi Awards for excellence in journalism: Deadline Reporting (Independent): Ina Fried, CNET News.com, (shared) for reporting about vulnerable technology and how the MSBlast virus spread.[12]
  • Reply 164 of 218
    jasenj1jasenj1 Posts: 923member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by BDBLACK View Post


    People always bring their computers to me looking like this. Its such a pain in the ass to manage software on the windows platform.



    You go to the control panel and use Add/Remove Applications. On OS X, you drag the app to the trash - and have no idea how many preference and other files it left behind.



    I totally agree that icons all over the desktop annoys me too. But that's the convention in Windows-land, and LOTS of people run their machines that way.



    Quote:

    On top of that there are all the crappy drivers, utilities, and adware that manufacturers and vendors throw on there. It really just pisses me off. Thats why I switched to Mac.



    This one is hard to blame on MS. They make the core OS, sell it to OEMs and wash their hands. The OEMs make $$$ preloading all that adware. And they COULD use better hardware with better drivers, but that would raise their cost, and the Windows world is dominated by "race to the bottom" hardware vendors.



    This is the huge problem MS has. As a pure software provider, they can only lean on the hardware manufacturers so hard. And they can only optimize their code so much. Google has it even worse with Android. Apple (and Nokia I guess) control the whole widget and so can dictate the user experience much easier.



    With regard to the article:

    +1 to those calling out AI for the misquote. What Ballmer has to say about WP7 is interesting enough without falsely frothing up the Apple fanbois.



    If MS can make a good business suite integrated with Office and Exchange, they'll make a killing in the corporate world and hurt RIM more than Apple.



    I've yet to see WP7's answer to Apple's App Store. The App Store has had problems to be sure, but it's easy to get apps and manage the apps on the iPhone.



    MS's media strategy appears to be to let third parties handle it (U-Verse). I think this will hurt WP7 as carriers and media providers partner up and lock out other sources (Verizon, I'm looking at you).



    My expectation in general is that MS will give the manufacturers and carriers a lot of leeway in what they do with WP7 and that will hurt the overall user experience just as it has with Windows.



    But if MS did even a half-decent job, they'll still sell by the millions. And in the end, that's all that matters - to MS.



    - Jasen.
  • Reply 165 of 218
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mcbeav View Post


    I have been thinking this for years. Ballmer has been destroying Microsoft.



    Sticking your head in the sand is not a corporate strategy, but it's been Ballmer's only comeback for the last five years.



    Microsoft shareholders continue to put themselves in peril every day they keep Ballmer at the helm.



    Is there a betting pool online for when Ballmer gets canned? I'll sign up....
  • Reply 166 of 218
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jkgm View Post


    You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.



    ** WIN!!! **
  • Reply 167 of 218
    applappl Posts: 348member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jasenj1 View Post


    I totally agree that icons all over the desktop annoys me too. But that's the convention in Windows-land, and LOTS of people run their machines that way.



    - Jasen.



    That's one of the things I hate most about iOS. Before Apple added folders, all the icons were strewn. And worst of all, they were strewn on different pages, and moved around by themselves.



    Now they have folders, but all the Folders icons look pretty much exactly the same.



    The entire manner of selecting an app is horrible on the iPhone. There's no good way to store things so they are easy to find. Your only choices are to have everything strewn all over, or put them into folders where the icons are all the same. It sucks big time.
  • Reply 168 of 218
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by axual View Post


    Steve Ballmer is out of touch ... in fact, if he were smart and forward thinking, he would be developing iPad apps. But instead, he complains and whines like a big baby for the most part.



    Good point. Rather than saying that Apple is selling more iPads or iPhones than he'd like, it would be better for him to say, "We congratulate Apple on their success..." and then cash in on that success by building MS Office for iOS. Imagine: iOS versions of Word, Excel, Access, PowerPoint, Outlook, etc. at $5 each, multiplied by, oh, I'll just toss out a number here, 10,000,000 iOS devices, and Microsoft has the potential to generate close to $250,000,000 in revenue. So much for Apple selling more devices than Ballmer would like.
  • Reply 169 of 218
    Microsoft is not to be taken lightly even if it has Steve Ballmer at the top.
  • Reply 170 of 218
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iWatch View Post


    oh ya, I forgot viruses!



    That is not because of the quality of either of the OS. Simply because Windows is more widely used at home and in corporations this system become the main target to get the data from users.

    It is all about efficiency.
  • Reply 171 of 218
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Wurm5150 View Post


    Interesting.. A lot of people out there are buying Apple product simply because it comes from Apple..



    I went to a reseller in China for an Iphone 4 16g at USD800.00 I went away without a phone because the waiting list was 1000 and resupply was 3 or 4 a day. These guys in this small town dont know much about Apple and certainly never had an Apple product.
  • Reply 172 of 218
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by shadash View Post


    "Day by day and almost minute by minute the past was brought up to date. In this way every prediction made by the Party could be shown by documentary evidence to have been correct; nor was any item of news, or any expression of opinion, which conflicted with the needs of the moment, ever allowed to remain on record. All history was a palimpsest, scraped clean and reinscribed exactly as often as was necessary."



    Awesome quote. The irony being that many here will have no clue as to it's origin.
  • Reply 173 of 218
    newbeenewbee Posts: 2,055member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cycomiko View Post


    Proud? Its a electronic device that somebody else created. You are not that special, you just use it.



    Have you never experienced "pride of ownership" ? When people come into my home and see my Mac their eyes light up (in most cases) and they start to ask me all kind of questions. It's the same reaction you get when you buy a new car and people want to ask you all about it. The difference is, with a car the feeling wears off after awhile while the Mac experience just acts like the energizer bunny ..... it just keeps going and going and going. My wish for you is that you get to experience that at least once in your life .... then you will understand "fanboyism".
  • Reply 174 of 218
    applappl Posts: 348member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by newbee View Post


    Have you never experienced \\\\\\"pride of ownership\\\\\\" ? When people come into my home and see my Mac their eyes light up (in most cases) and they start to ask me all kind of questions. It\\\\\\'s the same reaction you get when you buy a new car and people want to ask you all about it. The difference is, with a car the feeling wears off after awhile while the Mac experience just acts like the energizer bunny ..... it just keeps going and going and going. My wish for you is that you get to experience that at least once in your life .... then you will understand \\\\\\"fanboyism\\\\\\".



    I recently read a good article on the phenomenon: http://youarenotsosmart.com/2010/05/...brand-loyalty/



    Some quotes:



    Add this sort of loyalty to something expensive, or a hobby which demands a large investment of time and money, and you get a fanboy. They defend their favorite stuff and ridicule the competition, ignoring facts if they contradict their emotional connection...



    On the other hand, if the product is unnecessary, like an iPad, there is a great chance the customer will become a fanboy because they had to choose to spend a big chunk of money on it. It?s the choosing one thing over another which leads to narratives about why you did it.



    If you have to rationalize why you bought a luxury item, you will probably find ways to see how it fits in with your self-image.



    Branding builds on this by giving you the option to create the person you think you are through choosing to align yourself with the mystique of certain products.
  • Reply 175 of 218
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by appl View Post


    That's one of the things I hate most about iOS. Before Apple added folders, all the icons were strewn. And worst of all, they were strewn on different pages, and moved around by themselves.



    Now they have folders, but all the Folders icons look pretty much exactly the same.



    The entire manner of selecting an app is horrible on the iPhone. There's no good way to store things so they are easy to find. Your only choices are to have everything strewn all over, or put them into folders where the icons are all the same. It sucks big time.





    On the iPhone you have 5 ways to to access apps:



    1) Dock: place high use apps in the bottom dock

    -- they are always visible on the desktop

    -- tap to select app

    -- exit app returns to desktop where you left it



    2) Desktop: place them on the desktop

    -- scroll to desired desktop pane

    -- tap to select app

    -- exit app returns to desktop where you left it



    3) Folders: place them in folders with similar apps

    -- scroll to desired desktop pane

    -- tap desired folder

    -- tap to select app

    -- exit app returns to open folder where you left it

    -- close folder returns to desktop where you left it



    4) Search: Spotlight search by [partial] name or keywords

    -- tap, then tap home button (or left swipe from desktop pane 1) to bring up search

    -- enter partial name or keyword

    -- scroll and tap selected app

    -- exit app returns to desktop where you left it



    5) Back and Forth: double-tap home button to open task tray of recent apps

    -- scroll and tap selected app

    -- exit app returns to desktop where you left it





    Go to the following URL:



    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gngr3...yer_embedded#!



    At about 4:34 in it shows app access on WP7. (Apparently the presenter is unaware of the search capability of iOS).





    Here are the WP7 ways to access apps (3 ways):



    A) Active Tiles: Put high-use apps in Active tiles on the desktop

    -- vertically scroll to the desired tile

    -- tap selected tile

    -- exit app returns to the top of Active Tile list, rather than where you left it



    B) Desktop List: Flick left from the start screen shows an alphabetic list of all apps

    -- vertically scroll list

    -- tap to select app

    -- unclear what happens on exit app.. returns to the top of Active Tile list, rather that where you left it?



    C) Back History:

    -- tap the back button to open prior app

    -- repeat to go back through history

    -- unclear what happens on exit app.. returns to the top of Active Tile list, rather that where you left it?





    While WP7 navigation appears more elegant with a few apps in Active Tiles or the Alphabetic list -- it quickly will become tedious to use with a lot of apps or activity.



    Basically, you have 3 Genisis-type options to locate an app:



    1) Start at the beginning of the active tiles list

    2) Start at the beginning of the alphabetical applications list

    3) Start at the end of the app history and go backwards only, one app at a time (back button)





    We have hundreds of apps on our iDevices, shared among 2 adults and 3 teenagers. While not perfect, iOS navigation is superior to this rather simplistic WP7 facade.



    I do like the concept of Active Tiles, if done with taste and moderation. But with an alpha list and back button as the only underpinning-- WP7 really has only basic navigation (meets minimum requirements), at best.



    ... and Active Tiles are, sadly, nothing more than attractive and distracting Potemkin village.



    .
  • Reply 176 of 218
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post


    True. Let's put that on a tablet ...



    enterprise OSes are quite different than consumer-grade OSes for a tablet.
  • Reply 177 of 218
    newbeenewbee Posts: 2,055member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by appl View Post


    I recently read a good article on the phenomenon: http://youarenotsosmart.com/2010/05/...brand-loyalty/

    Branding builds on this by giving you the option to create the person you think you are through choosing to align yourself with the mystique of certain products.



    It's interesting to note that the "blogger" who wrote this "advice" has a degree in journalism ..... not psychology. fwiw
  • Reply 178 of 218
    applappl Posts: 348member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


    While WP7 navigation appears more elegant with a few apps in Active Tiles or the Alphabetic list -- it quickly will become tedious to use with a lot of apps or activity.



    .





    Maybe the iPhone\\'s navigation is almost as elegant as WP7, but I still miss my PalmOS devices. They were light years ahead in basic of areas, like finding and launching apps.



    Alas, I won\\'t be experiencing the elegance of a WP7 phone, given that the OS restricts you from installing the software you might prefer over the software that happens to be for sale by the OS supplier. Yeah - the app launcher might be better than Apple\\'s, but that ain\\'t saying much.



    I have little to no interest in getting a WindozePhone7 Phone.
  • Reply 179 of 218
    bwinskibwinski Posts: 164member
    Ballmer sat that softball on a 3 1/2 ft. tall 'tee' so anyone could knock this one out of the park.



    You're right MicroShaft means something to users.. It means a lifetime (if you can tolerate ulcers that long) of grief...hacked O/S's, endless 'add on' software and shaky hardware that may cost you thousands of dollars, UGLY viruses, continuous hacks because EVERYONE in the business knows how to hack ANY version of Winders, and the list goes on and on and on and on...



    MicroShaft makes the WORST SOFTWARE ON EARTH!! IF, you are crazy enough to realize anything different - you're own your own.
  • Reply 180 of 218
    applappl Posts: 348member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by newbee View Post


    It\\'s interesting to note that the \\"blogger\\" who wrote this \\"advice\\" has a degree in journalism ..... not psychology. fwiw



    I\\'m more interested in his statements and his reasoning than I am in his degree.



    If he had 20 degrees in psychology I\\'d still evaluate his every statement and search for cogent support.



    It is very possible to carefully choose one\\'s sources, and to believe what they say. To bow to their authority. But that is an unreliable method of finding truth, IMO.



    Instead, one should look at the message, and not the messenger. One should be skeptical, even when the messenger is an authority on the subject. Otherwise, one inevitably discards some valuable insights and respects some utter rubbish.
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