Apple's Eddy Cue explains Apple Pay on Apple Watch at NBA game [u]

Posted:
in Future Apple Hardware edited March 2015
Oracle Arena, home of the Golden State Warriors, became the second NBA venue to adopt Apple Pay on Friday, and Apple SVP of Internet Software and Services Eddy Cue was on hand to explain how the service will work with Apple Watch.


Eddy Cue shows off Apple Pay with Warriors president Rick Welts at Oracle Arena. | Source: Mashable


Although Cue sported a stainless steel Apple Watch at the game in Oakland, Calif., he used an iPhone 6 to make purchases from the Warriors' team shop and only discussed the wearable's payment capabilities, reports Mashable. Cue also announced the arena's new Apple Pay compatibility on Twitter.

Describing the purchasing process, Cue said that users only need to perform a double press of Apple Watch's side button to conduct a transaction. As long as a paired iPhone is in range, Touch ID authentication is unnecessary, meaning users can leave the handset in their pocket. Users will also have the option to set a passcode lock, if they so choose.

"You don't have to authenticate on the phone," Cue said. "Your watch has to be unlocked and your phone can unlock your watch and so it knows, if I took my watch off and gave it to you it would know. If I wanted to pay right now I could just pay with the watch and not have to take the phone out at all or unlock it."

This convenience sets Apple Pay, and by extension Apple Watch, apart from existing NFC-based mobile payments systems and can help encourage adoption among new users, Cue said.

"Anything that makes things more convenient and easy to use helps with adoption," he said. "When the quarter's over and you want a drink, you want to get it as fast as possible. And now we're going to make it even easier because we will be able to pay with the watch."

In addition, the Apple exec confirmed Apple Watch will enable owners of iPhone 5, 5s and 5c handsets, which do not have NFC chips, to make touchless Apple Pay transactions.

Oracle Arena was also one of the first professional sports venues in the U.S. to install iBeacon technology, which was initially used by the team to advertise ticket upgrades to fans sitting in cheap seats.

In November, Cue pulled a similar PR stunt with local California news station KTLA. The Apple exec went on a "holiday shopping spree" at Apple Pay partner stores, including Panera Bread and the Apple Store.

Update: CNET, which was also on hand for Cue's demonstration, reports that the Warriors are exploring options to add Apple Pay to concession stands. The system pay also one day allow fans to order and pay for products in the stands.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 156
    And there are no pictures of him wearing the watch?
  • Reply 2 of 156
    And there are no pictures of him wearing the watch?

    AppleSecurity? Lol.

    The double tap should alleviate any unfounded fears that someone willl just pass by your watch with a skimmer. Obviously that was announced when Watch was, but it's good to repeat it.
  • Reply 3 of 156
    If you click on the cnet article it shows him wearing it on his right wrist upside down so for those left handers it alleviates that fear
  • Reply 4 of 156
    solipsismysolipsismy Posts: 5,099member
    That's fine that it doesn't require any authentication once it's on your wrist and actively tethered to your iPhone, but if that's the only way ?Pay can be used on ?Watch despite having it's own NFC HW, which includes the secure element, then they are dropping the ball. It should be independent of an iPhone after it's been setup so you can put it next to an NFC reader and have your cards appear, once it's been authenticated when put on until it's removed. But if that wasn't mentioned by Cue then I have to concede by saying [@]Dick Applebaum[/@] was right.
  • Reply 5 of 156
    flaneurflaneur Posts: 4,506member
    The other big story about how the Watch is going to make things easier and quicker is in TechCrunch, linked to by Gruber:

    http://techcrunch.com/2015/03/06/the-apple-watch-is-time-saved/#tmhmdj:DqmR

    Gruber's take is here;

    http://daringfireball.net

    The Watch is going to change the world, one more time.

    Those who are predicting the Apple Watch will disappoint or worse are once again [I]failing to imagine[/I]. There is not a sorrier failing in tech prognostication. It's why we laugh at Ballmer, Enderle, Dvorak, etc., many years later.
  • Reply 6 of 156
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,111member
    Sounds awesome. Makes payment even faster and easier than it already is with Touch ID and Apple Pay.
  • Reply 7 of 156
    dick applebaumdick applebaum Posts: 12,505member
    flaneur wrote: »
    The other big story about how the Watch is going to make things easier and quicker is in TechCrunch, linked to by Gruber:

    http://techcrunch.com/2015/03/06/the-apple-watch-is-time-saved/#tmhmdj:DqmR

    Gruber's take is here;

    http://daringfireball.net

    The Watch is going to change the world, one more time.

    Those who are predicting the Apple Watch will disappoint or worse are once again failing to imagine. There is not a sorrier failing in tech prognostication. It's why we laugh at Ballmer, Enderle, Dvorak, etc., many years later.

    Here's the quote I like best:

    "... it's worth pointing out that [t]here are very, very, very few products that allow you to hand someone cash and be given back TIME"

    http://www.imore.com/apple-watch-will-make-you-use-your-iphone-less
  • Reply 8 of 156
    This sounds worse than using the iPhone.

    Having to do a double press of buttons on the Apple Watch sounds very fiddly indeed. For the old, who tend to shake, even more so. Much easier to simply rest your thumb on the Home button of the iPhone.

    I'm surprised at this and will reserve complete judgment until I've tried it in an Apple Store.
  • Reply 9 of 156
    danielswdanielsw Posts: 905member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by tkrunner1738 View Post



    And there are no pictures of him wearing the watch?



    Too many big words for ya?

  • Reply 10 of 156
    danielswdanielsw Posts: 905member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post



    This sounds worse than using the iPhone.



    Having to do a double press of buttons on the Apple Watch sounds very fiddly indeed. For the old, who tend to shake, even more so. Much easier to simply rest your thumb on the Home button of the iPhone.



    I'm surprised at this and will reserve complete judgment until I've tried it in an Apple Store.



    You tend to shake, huh? Pity.

  • Reply 11 of 156
    danielswdanielsw Posts: 905member

    What I see is the computing world's relentless migration to smaller and smaller form factors: more and more use of the iPhone: away from tablets: away from desktops: away from towers: away from mini computers: away from mainframes, etc.

     

    The ?Watch may initially be tethered, but it'll soon be more autonomous, as Apple learns more how its customers use the product, as technology advances to afford better battery life, and as apps an system updates allow more functionality.

     

    Ive & company will discover how to do that with experience.

     

    In the mean time, it'll be fun to play with Apple's new toys. We'll leave the whiners in the dust.

  • Reply 12 of 156
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    I'm going to guess an elderly person whose hands shake probably won't be buying an ?Watch. Who knows if they even use an iPhone.
  • Reply 13 of 156
    danielsw wrote: »
    What I see is the computing world's relentless migration to smaller and smaller form factors: more and more use of the iPhone: away from tablets: away from desktops: away from towers: away from mini computers: away from mainframes, etc.

    The ?Watch may initially be tethered, but it'll soon be more autonomous, as Apple learns more how its customers use the product, as technology advances to afford better battery life, and as apps an system updates allow more functionality.

    Ive & company will discover how to do that with experience.

    In the mean time, it'll be fun to play with Apple's new toys. We'll leave the whiners in the dust.

    This is ultimately why I think HoloLens and other VR/AR devices will be niche at best, they reverse this trend. We're a long way off from an iPhone or Watch having the power to drive one of those, and they're also more obtrusive.
  • Reply 14 of 156
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post



    This sounds worse than using the iPhone.



    Having to do a double press of buttons on the Apple Watch sounds very fiddly indeed. For the old, who tend to shake, even more so. Much easier to simply rest your thumb on the Home button of the iPhone.



    I'm surprised at this and will reserve complete judgment until I've tried it in an Apple Store.



     

    I highly doubt it.

    ________________________________________________________________________________________________________

     

    As previous:

    Quote: 


    Ahh. You read minds

     

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post



    Agreed.



    As far as I'm concerned, Tim Cook saying that he can't comment on the iCar rumour confirms that Apple are, indeed, seriously developing a car.



    I think the timing of this huge rumour is telling. Whilst I'd love to see the Apple Watch sell a ton, I don't think it will. I think Cook realises this, due to the lack of interest that they have no doubt seen both in public and internal surveys. As such, rather than let the negative launch of the Apple Watch overwhelm them, Cook has chosen to release the iCar rumour so as to change the narrative and give hope to bigger things. After all, they could have quite easily chosen to delay the large signings from Tesla, Mercedes and others until after the Watch launch. The fact that these have happened only shortly before it is, in my humble opinion, the writing on the wall for the fate of the Watch, sadly.



     

    To witch, Quote:

    Originally Posted by pacificfilm View Post



    Citations please, or is this simply your assumption?


     



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post



    Citations please, or is this simply your assumption?[/quote]



    I've seen at least two public surveys which showed very low interest in the Apple Watch, much lower than the iPhone or iPad.

     

     WOW!

     

    After reading two (imaginary?) public surveys you tired out?

     

    As has so well been said beforePut up or shut up!


     



    Still waiting!
  • Reply 15 of 156
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,378member
    rogifan wrote: »
    I'm going to guess an elderly person whose hands shake probably won't be buying an ?Watch. Who knows if they even use an iPhone.
    My mom is 84. She has an iPhone and an iPad. I'm thinking of getting her an ?Watch so she doesn't have to take her phone out of her pockets. But not sure yet because of the recharge requirements -- if she forgets to charge it, or put it on, then what good does it do her. And Her hands shake.

    So do people with Parkinson's. I bet Michael J Fox has an iPhone too.
  • Reply 16 of 156
    flaneurflaneur Posts: 4,506member
    This sounds worse than using the iPhone.

    Having to do a double press of buttons on the Apple Watch sounds very fiddly indeed. For the old, who tend to shake, even more so. Much easier to simply rest your thumb on the Home button of the iPhone.

    I'm surprised at this and will reserve complete judgment until I've tried it in an Apple Store.

    Apologies to those who have the entuty B Frost on their ignore list, but this post shows cracks in his persona from stress.

    Desperation to find a negative: "the old, who tend to shake." Right, all us palsied iPhone users in our 70s. Maybe he means the huge market segment of those in their 80s.

    Breaking of character: "will reserve complete judgment." Note the American spelling of "judgment." British usage, which entity Frost is normally so careful to adopt, is "judgement." I have speculated that he's an American hired to represent a English troll.

    The impression is of someone worried that he will lose his job when his humiliation is total.
  • Reply 17 of 156
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    the photo's caption says cue and another guy demo Apple pay, yet the image is a screen with no people or demo notable. odd caption.
  • Reply 18 of 156
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,378member
    [QUOTE]As long as a paired iPhone is in range, Touch ID authentication is unnecessary[/QUOTE]
    Is he saying the watch requires an iPhone to actually make a payment using ?Pay? So you can't run out for a jog wearing only the watch and buy a bottle of Gatorade, without your iPhone nearby?
  • Reply 19 of 156
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    mac_128 wrote: »
    My mom is 84. She has an iPhone and an iPad. I'm thinking of getting her an ?Watch so she doesn't have to take her phone out of her pockets. But not sure yet because of the recharge requirements -- if she forgets to charge it, or put it on, then what good does it do her. And Her hands shake.

    So do people with Parkinson's. I bet Michael J Fox has an iPhone too.

    you want to get one for your mom, but you may not because she might....forget to wear it. that's the basis of your criticism?
  • Reply 20 of 156
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    mac_128 wrote: »
    Is he saying the watch requires an iPhone to actually make a payment using ?Pay? So you can't run out for a jog wearing only the watch and buy a bottle of Gatorade, without your iPhone nearby?

    From what I've read it will require a pin code and once authenticated as long as it's touching your skin it's good to use for ?Pay. If you take it off or it loses contact with your skin then you have to re-authenticate.
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