Apple's Jony Ive promoted to Chief Design Officer

Posted:
in General Discussion edited May 2015
Longtime Apple designer Jony Ive has been promoted from SVP of Design to a new position called Chief Design Officer, which will see the star designer relinquish day-to-day oversight of industrial design and user interface operations to take on a wider array of projects.


Apple Chief Design Officer Jony Ive (center), flanked by head of User Interface Alan Dye (left) and Industrial Design chief Richard Howarth. | Source: The Telegraph


Revealed by The Telegraph on Monday, Ive will retain leadership of all hardware and UI design initiatives under his new roll as Chief Design Officer. His exact duties have yet to be detailed, but it appears the new position involves an expanded focus into construction projects, specifically Apple's Campus 2 and upcoming Apple Stores.

Taking over industrial design duties is Richard Howarth, who was instrumental in bringing iPhone to life from the first prototypes to its production debut in 2007. Alan Dye is to be named Apple's head of User Interface Design, an important post ultimately responsible for creating the methods by which owners interact with their Apple devices. Dye was largely responsible for the Apple Watch user interface, the report said.

Ive said he will still be in charge of both design departments, but should be able to concentrate on Apple's broader design language after being freed from banal administrative and management work. In a statement provided to Re/code, Apple said Ive will work on current design products, new ideas and future initiatives.

In 2013, Ive became Apple's SVP of Design, a catch-all title reflecting dual roles as chief hardware and human interface designer, the latter passed down by ousted iOS chief Scott Forstall.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 142
    dtm1212dtm1212 Posts: 11member
    Uh-Oh
  • Reply 2 of 142
    jakebjakeb Posts: 559member

    Well deserved! 

  • Reply 3 of 142
    For the foreseeable future, his work is done. Good to get out in the world, travel a little, see life with a fresh eye. Probably long overdue.
  • Reply 4 of 142
    lord amhranlord amhran Posts: 902member

    Ugh. He needs to be relieved of UI Design duties. UI is clearly not his forté.

  • Reply 5 of 142
    hoobitronhoobitron Posts: 28member
    So is this a good thing or bad thing for Apple investors?
  • Reply 6 of 142
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    All those people who said Marc Newson was hired to take over for Jony Ive look silly about right now...and are frantically googling to find out more information about Richard Howarth. :D
  • Reply 7 of 142
    thewhitefalconthewhitefalcon Posts: 4,453member

    I'm thinking the fatigue finally got to him. He didn't sound like he was handling the stress well in the interviews. Apple Watch can be his final product, now he steps to a reduced role like Bob Mansfield.

  • Reply 8 of 142
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    Btw, Avie Tevanian was promoted to Chief Technology Officer but left Apple a year or so after that. I wouldn't be surprised if Ive retired after Campus 2 is complete. But one difference - when Tevanian was put in that role I don't think he had anyone reporting to him. Apparently Richard Howart and Alan Dye still report to Ive.

    Now we just need Jeff Williams promotion to COO. I certainly think he deserves it.
  • Reply 9 of 142
    nightskynightsky Posts: 43member
    Hopefully this will free him up to spend more time thinking about potential future products. The shift to focus on designing the new Cupertino campus is a little worrying. Sounds like he's a little bored tinkering at the edges with the Mac and IOS device designs which never seem to change all that much from one year to the next.
  • Reply 10 of 142
    thewhitefalconthewhitefalcon Posts: 4,453member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Hoobitron View Post



    So is this a good thing or bad thing for Apple investors?



    All these people are Ive proteges, and I'm sure Ive got to pick his successor, so I'd say there's not much to worry about. It's not like Jony was the only one coming up with things, he just helped bring order to chaos.

  • Reply 11 of 142
    inklinginkling Posts: 731member
    Whatever happens, I hope this'll mean Apple gets over its obsession with thin and start making laptops that are more feature-rich and less port-poor. Every time I think of getting a MacBook Air, I end up asking myself if there's that much difference between it an my iPad with a keyboard. I draw a blank.
  • Reply 12 of 142
    thewhitefalconthewhitefalcon Posts: 4,453member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Inkling View Post



    Whatever happens, I hope this'll mean Apple gets over its obsession with thin and start making laptops that are more feature-rich and less port-poor. Every time I think of getting a MacBook Air, I end up asking myself if there's that much difference between it an my iPad with a keyboard. I draw a blank.



    Yeah, that whole thing about one having OS X and Windows capability and one having iOS just slips the mind, I suppose.

  • Reply 13 of 142
    malomalo Posts: 19member
    Apple signaling new organizational alignment as the enterprise grows even further. More products, more SKU's, last thing you want is him becoming a product manager. This is a great decision - liberating a visionary and allowing him to stretch creatively, love it!
  • Reply 14 of 142
    pfisherpfisher Posts: 758member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post



    Btw, Avie Tevanian was promoted to Chief Technology Officer but left Apple a year or so after that. I wouldn't be surprised if Ive retired after Campus 2 is complete. But one difference - when Tevanian was put in that role I don't think he had anyone reporting to him. Apparently Richard Howart and Alan Dye still report to Ive.



    Now we just need Jeff Williams promotion to COO. I certainly think he deserves it.

    Greatest game ever (Mac Missiles):

     

  • Reply 15 of 142
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,317member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Lord Amhran View Post

     

    Ugh. He needs to be relieved of UI Design duties. UI is clearly not his forté.


     

    Clearly. And the pathetic sales of Apple products running his UI is "clear" evidence of this right? Oh wait, sales have actually exploded, so the only thing that is "clear" is that your meaningless opinion is just that- a useless, meaningless opinion. Try not to pretend it's anything else, with words like "clearly". 

  • Reply 16 of 142
    suddenly newtonsuddenly newton Posts: 13,788member

    DOOOOOOOOOMED

  • Reply 17 of 142
    nagrommenagromme Posts: 2,834member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Inkling View Post



    Whatever happens, I hope this'll mean Apple gets over its obsession with thin and start making laptops that are more feature-rich and less port-poor. Every time I think of getting a MacBook Air, I end up asking myself if there's that much difference between it an my iPad with a keyboard. I draw a blank.

     

    To fill in the blank: Mac OS X (if you've only used an iPad, trust me: OS X is a different animal, and great for different things; with a cursor-based UI instead of raising your arm awkwardly to touch).

     

    And I have bad news: the need to combine "portability" with "lots of cords all at once" is only going to diminish in future. Those days are not returning. On the bright side: as we move towards our wireless future, hubs and docks--and different laptop models for different needs--will still be available for the outlier situations.

  • Reply 18 of 142
    inklinginkling Posts: 731member



    Actually, the OS X v. iOS thing tilts me heavily toward that iPad. The apps are far cheaper and there seems to be a greater variety of them.

     

    What doesn't work on iOS are complex apps like the Adobe CC ones I use. Touch just can't handle a complex UI. But those are also a no-go on a laptop. Not enough screen space. 

     

    In part, it's me. For writing, an iPad plus keyboard is as good as a laptop. For doing layout and editorial work, a desktop is a must. Between the two, there's nothing I need to do that requires a laptop. I've not used my old MacBook in several months.

     

    I used to alternate buying a desktop and a laptop, with the latter doing service as a backup if my desktop died. But with how stripped down Apple's laptops have become in that pursuit of thinnest, they're no longer a substitute for a desktop. Not enough ports. No ability to upgrade the RAM or storage. 

  • Reply 19 of 142
    rayzrayz Posts: 814member
    slurpy wrote: »
    Clearly. And the pathetic sales of Apple products running his UI is "clear" evidence of this right? Oh wait, sales have actually exploded, so the only thing that is "clear" is that your meaningless opinion is just that- a useless, meaningless opinion. Try not to pretend it's anything else, with words like "clearly". 

    Well said. I never understand people who think reality will shift if they add 'clearly' or 'anyone can see' to their post.
  • Reply 20 of 142
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    nightsky wrote: »
    Hopefully this will free him up to spend more time thinking about potential future products. The shift to focus on designing the new Cupertino campus is a little worrying. Sounds like he's a little bored tinkering at the edges with the Mac and IOS device designs which never seem to change all that much from one year to the next.

    According to an all employee memo from Tim Cook he will be focusing on "new ideas and future initiatives". Like Apple car perhaps? ;)
    Jony will remain responsible for all of our design, focusing entirely on current design projects, new ideas and future initiatives. On July 1, he will hand off his day-to-day managerial responsibilities of ID and UI to Richard Howarth, our new vice president of Industrial Design, and Alan Dye, our new vice president of User Interface Design.
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