Futuremark analysis debunks rumor that Apple slows older iPhones down on purpose with iOS ...

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Comments

  • Reply 101 of 123
    On purpose? Maybe not. Due to sloppy testing and development? Yes.

    Slownes is not the only problem. Draining batteries is another. Upgrade and check how quickly you lose charge next day. I had fun with coworkers showing that. You cannot cheat when usage pattern exist by user. iOS 11 is also poor in managing font sizes and more specifally spacing when you use enlarged font on smaller phones like SE or 5S. I wonder if anyone at Apple tested that, because that is embarassing. just have it enlarged and bold on iOS10 to some resonable size that is for people who have weaker vision and then upgrade to iOS11 without changing font size. Now decreasing size does not fizx spacing problem. Check for example how your Bluetooth list looks like after upgrade to iOS11. I took screenshots as I could not believe it.
  • Reply 102 of 123
    For whining folks ,disable wifi .Never use the internet. Never use apps ,never update. Your phone will remain shiny forever. iPhone 5S was from 2013.My one runs fine. The fact that you still get software support with new features is awesome.
    Yes. And the best advice of your type is turn iPhone off. That will help with power for sure. Very impractical however.
  • Reply 103 of 123
    jcs2305jcs2305 Posts: 392member
    sog35 said:
    dysamoria said:
    Were they hired by Apple to deal with this growing PR problem?

    Benchmarks are well known not to translate to real-world usage. The biggest complaints are with GUI, restart, and app load slowdowns, not CPU or GPU functionality. No testing done on those facets, right?

    The most vocal complaints overall are with the "just upgraded" times after a new iOS comes out. Every apologist tells us why we should mock complainers as ignorant fools, and Apple rest on their laurels with that as the community solution, rather than actually addressing that issue themselves once and for all.

    It isn't even a question: Apple want you to keep buying the same hardware products every year. Now that they have phones and iPads, they can push an even faster upgrade cycle than with Macs. They are a hardware company using minimal software development to lure new buyers, who eventually may discover that the development of that software only supports selling the bullet point new features of each iOS, which sells iPhones (not continued maturation of the software product). In fact, their iOS developments have actually harmed their prior quality software development, like iWork (being back-ported from iOS to Mac OS, trashing hundreds of features and installing a clumsy GUI).

    Yes, there is a push to upgrade to a new phone. Yes, the OS is the push. No, Apple don't optimize iOS for any device but the newest. Yes, planned obsolescence is a real thing. The computer industry has made it so much more blatant than any other industry and has accelerated the same in every industry that sells computerized product: Push product out prematurely, ignore the software bugs, push out the successor ASAP, and abandon the predecessor.
    What uninformed bullshit. Apple certainly does optimize on devices older than the latest. This is why it is unarguable fact that iOS devices have the longest useful lifespans of the industry with the longest support. Unlike Androids where even flagships are abandonware immediately after launch. If you have facts to the contrary, please share them. 

    But, as with all computing platforms, as the software increases in capability so must the hardware requirements. It is unrealistic and quite foolish to expect old computing devices to run new platforms with identical performance as new hardware with increased capability. How anyone can believe that it's instead an evil corporation twirling their waxed mustaches trying to screw you is a mystery. I'm guessing you don't work with computing technology very much.

    Anyway the real proof is the resale market -- unlike your conspiracy theory, people actually understand this and are willing to pay premium prices for used devices, unlike the knockoffs.


    The point is I don't want to run NEW features.

    I just want the same features I had when I first bought the phone.

    Bottom line is an iPhone gets slower after each major iOS release. That is a FACT.
    I did my younger  brother’s 6 Plus update to iOS 11.. fresh installed iOS 11 pulled everything back down from the cloud running smooth and fast. My gf’s 6s Plus did the same with the same result. I also did the same thing with my iPad Air 2 .. again same result.

    If you choose to do update after update restoring from previous older back ups, from previous iOS versions you are asking for trouble in my opinion. Out of all the devices I upgaded to iOS 11, my personal 128gb 7 Plus was updated at work over the air using a backup with zero issues. It’s been a beast from launch day and still is. Fast and smooth. Still makes me smile. 😎
  • Reply 104 of 123
    lkrupp said:
    Okay, look, here's the reality. The public perception is that Apple has somehow crippled the hardware with an OS update, forcing users to buy new phones.

    No, that is not the public perception. It is the perception of the wannabe tech crowd that loiters in comment sections making wild, unfounded, unconfirmed, irrational claims.
    People may not believe that Apple intentionally slows down their iPhone or iPad but I can tell you from first-hand experience older devices do feel slower. I was using my mother’s iPad mini 2 (which is running the latest software available for it) the other weekend and there was a lot of UI lag. People aren’t imagining this. 
    That is because the latest software requires better hardware, that is not because the iPad mini 2 hardware has been crippled by the latest software. Two very different things if we are looking for the causation.

    The solution is either Apple make a seperate update for older hardware that does not require the latest chip A(x) to run fast or significantly cripple the latest software when it was installed on the older hardware. Both are horrible.

    The third option is not to install the latest software on the older hardware IF you don't want to sacrifice the speed.
  • Reply 105 of 123
    foggyhill said:
    Soli said:
    It's unfortunate that so much time and effort has to be spent on such a ridiculous premise. If Apple was looking to hamstring older devices to push people to update to the newest models they would simply not even waste time making a new OS work with older devices. Frankly I'm surprised Apple even goes out of their way to support older devices in SW as long as they do when there competitors don't/can't.
    Maybe they should stop supporting anything older than the last generation device. 

    If you have owned multiple iPhones, then you should know that after 2 years, your device will slow down considerably if you update the OS. 
    Newer operating systems will use more resources. Plus, if your battery was on the brink of being consumed, then it's going to kill your already dying battery. 

    If you don't want your device to slow down, don't update the OS or the 3rd party apps that you use. If you are worried about security, then turn off cellular data while you are away from a known good wifi connection. Although that's a tinfoil hat move. 

    Sorry if it's a bitter pill, but your $900 phone only has a 2 year lifespan realistically.  That's including non Apple devices. 


    You know no such things, you basically stated a lie as a fact. You are thus a liar. bitter pill I know buddy, but that's a fact.

    I've got a god damn Ipad2 still in use and my 3GS is also still working, plus got 5s, 6s in operation in the family. Those phones are figment of my imagination in your mind it seems.
    I guess you are missing the point. If you want the latest OS and have it not slow your device down, you are limited to basically 2 years. I don't care if you have an older device, so do I. I also know that It would be pointless to try to update my iPhone 5s to iOS 11. The few features that would be supported on that phone would not be greater than the overall speed hit of trying to run a new OS on a 4 year old phone. So I upgraded to a new phone. 

    Im not bitching about my 5s not being able to run as fast as the day I got it with a brand new OS. 

    I know enough to not to complain when my device is over 2 years old and is slower because of updates jackass. 
  • Reply 106 of 123
    my 6 has taken noticeably longer to open my every day apps since I installed ios11.   

    But I don't think that's a conspiracy, I think ios11 has things that will of course make apps launch slower.  I'm ok with that, because they could as easily say "we only support 2 years and then you get no more updates" and lock me on ios10.  I think Apple does a good job of supporting older hardware, better than a lot of software companies do.  
  • Reply 107 of 123
    nhtnht Posts: 4,125member
    foggyhill said:
    Soli said:
    It's unfortunate that so much time and effort has to be spent on such a ridiculous premise. If Apple was looking to hamstring older devices to push people to update to the newest models they would simply not even waste time making a new OS work with older devices. Frankly I'm surprised Apple even goes out of their way to support older devices in SW as long as they do when there competitors don't/can't.
    Maybe they should stop supporting anything older than the last generation device. 

    If you have owned multiple iPhones, then you should know that after 2 years, your device will slow down considerably if you update the OS. 
    Newer operating systems will use more resources. Plus, if your battery was on the brink of being consumed, then it's going to kill your already dying battery. 

    If you don't want your device to slow down, don't update the OS or the 3rd party apps that you use. If you are worried about security, then turn off cellular data while you are away from a known good wifi connection. Although that's a tinfoil hat move. 

    Sorry if it's a bitter pill, but your $900 phone only has a 2 year lifespan realistically.  That's including non Apple devices. 


    You know no such things, you basically stated a lie as a fact. You are thus a liar. bitter pill I know buddy, but that's a fact.

    I've got a god damn Ipad2 still in use and my 3GS is also still working, plus got 5s, 6s in operation in the family. Those phones are figment of my imagination in your mind it seems.
    I guess you are missing the point. If you want the latest OS and have it not slow your device down, you are limited to basically 2 years. I don't care if you have an older device, so do I. I also know that It would be pointless to try to update my iPhone 5s to iOS 11. The few features that would be supported on that phone would not be greater than the overall speed hit of trying to run a new OS on a 4 year old phone. So I upgraded to a new phone. 

    Im not bitching about my 5s not being able to run as fast as the day I got it with a brand new OS. 

    I know enough to not to complain when my device is over 2 years old and is slower because of updates jackass. 
    Your point is trolling.  The 2014 iPhone 6 is fine with iOS 11 if you do a factory fresh install and let it index a bit after you reinstall your apps.

    The 5S is 25% as fast as an 8 and iOS 11 isn't bad on it.  If we hadn't killed ours by dropping it water we'd update it because the performance hit is minimal.

    https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2017/09/ios-11-on-the-iphone-5s-slower-but-not-quite-slow/
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 108 of 123
    sog35 said:
    My 6 Plus is lagging and slow since I upgraded to iOS 11

    ZDNet has an article today titled "Here's why your old iPhone feels slow -- and what you can do about it".

    All of the whiners who are crying about how Apple spilled their milk, should read it!

    🤔
    edited October 2017
  • Reply 109 of 123
    jurassic said:
    sog35 said:
    My 6 Plus is lagging and slow since I upgraded to iOS 11

    ZDNet has an article today titled "Here's why your old iPhone feels slow -- and what you can do about it".

    All of the whiners who are crying about how Apple spilled their milk, should read it!

    🤔
    Got here by accident reviewing today’s news. I had to sign up while having a little smile wondering how many posters here chiding people for having the temerity to think their older iPhones might be made to provide slower responses would be contemplating their humble pie. No conspiracy but a shameless lack of transparency and evasion about what was really happening. Perhaps less credulity from some folks including editors would go a little way to more balanced discussion. Enjoy and watch this space. 

    https://forums.appleinsider.com/discussion/203310/apple-responds-to-reports-of-worn-batteries-forcing-iphone-cpu-slowdowns/p1
  • Reply 110 of 123
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 2,699administrator
    rjd185 said:
    jurassic said:
    sog35 said:
    My 6 Plus is lagging and slow since I upgraded to iOS 11

    ZDNet has an article today titled "Here's why your old iPhone feels slow -- and what you can do about it".

    All of the whiners who are crying about how Apple spilled their milk, should read it!

    ߤ䦬t;/div>
    Got here by accident reviewing today’s news. I had to sign up while having a little smile wondering how many posters here chiding people for having the temerity to think their older iPhones might be made to provide slower responses would be contemplating their humble pie. No conspiracy but a shameless lack of transparency and evasion about what was really happening. Perhaps less credulity from some folks including editors would go a little way to more balanced discussion. Enjoy and watch this space. 

    https://forums.appleinsider.com/discussion/203310/apple-responds-to-reports-of-worn-batteries-forcing-iphone-cpu-slowdowns/p1
    You're still wrong, though.

    With a properly performing battery, the phones are just as fast as they ever were. This test, and the GeekBench numbers utterly prove it. The conspiracy theory is bogus. Apple is still not slowing down phones to force you to buy a new one. 
    edited December 2017
  • Reply 111 of 123
    danvmdanvm Posts: 569member
    rjd185 said:
    jurassic said:
    sog35 said:
    My 6 Plus is lagging and slow since I upgraded to iOS 11

    ZDNet has an article today titled "Here's why your old iPhone feels slow -- and what you can do about it".

    All of the whiners who are crying about how Apple spilled their milk, should read it!

    ߤ䦬t;/div>
    Got here by accident reviewing today’s news. I had to sign up while having a little smile wondering how many posters here chiding people for having the temerity to think their older iPhones might be made to provide slower responses would be contemplating their humble pie. No conspiracy but a shameless lack of transparency and evasion about what was really happening. Perhaps less credulity from some folks including editors would go a little way to more balanced discussion. Enjoy and watch this space. 

    https://forums.appleinsider.com/discussion/203310/apple-responds-to-reports-of-worn-batteries-forcing-iphone-cpu-slowdowns/p1
    You're still wrong, though.

    With a properly performing battery, the phones are just as fast as they ever were. This test, and the GeekBench numbers utterly prove it. The conspiracy theory is bogus. Apple is still not slowing down phones to force you to buy a new one. 
    Some comments you posted in this article mention,

    The phones are literally the same speed as the day they were bought and these metrics are the proof. The difference is the load placed on them by the software.

    There is no Cook and Ive plot to turn down the processor and GPU speed. That's insane to even speculate, but yet, here we are.

    It does no such thing. The phone's hardware is identical and not throttled in any way.
    Does the software put additional load on the older hardware? Sure. But, that doesn't mean the phone is slower. It moves the bits from register to register just as fast as it always has.

    So you blame the issue to everything, but the CPU throttling, which was really happening.  Since the beginning you were wrong, same as the article. 

  • Reply 112 of 123
    nhtnht Posts: 4,125member
    danvm said:
    rjd185 said:
    jurassic said:
    sog35 said:
    My 6 Plus is lagging and slow since I upgraded to iOS 11

    ZDNet has an article today titled "Here's why your old iPhone feels slow -- and what you can do about it".

    All of the whiners who are crying about how Apple spilled their milk, should read it!

    ߤ䦬t;/div>
    Got here by accident reviewing today’s news. I had to sign up while having a little smile wondering how many posters here chiding people for having the temerity to think their older iPhones might be made to provide slower responses would be contemplating their humble pie. No conspiracy but a shameless lack of transparency and evasion about what was really happening. Perhaps less credulity from some folks including editors would go a little way to more balanced discussion. Enjoy and watch this space. 

    https://forums.appleinsider.com/discussion/203310/apple-responds-to-reports-of-worn-batteries-forcing-iphone-cpu-slowdowns/p1
    You're still wrong, though.

    With a properly performing battery, the phones are just as fast as they ever were. This test, and the GeekBench numbers utterly prove it. The conspiracy theory is bogus. Apple is still not slowing down phones to force you to buy a new one. 
    Some comments you posted in this article mention,

    The phones are literally the same speed as the day they were bought and these metrics are the proof. The difference is the load placed on them by the software.

    There is no Cook and Ive plot to turn down the processor and GPU speed. That's insane to even speculate, but yet, here we are.

    It does no such thing. The phone's hardware is identical and not throttled in any way.
    Does the software put additional load on the older hardware? Sure. But, that doesn't mean the phone is slower. It moves the bits from register to register just as fast as it always has.

    So you blame the issue to everything, but the CPU throttling, which was really happening.  Since the beginning you were wrong, same as the article. 

    Nope.  The point is there is no conspiracy to slow down older iPhones to make you buy a new one.  If the battery in a new iPhone X is weak it gets throttled too.  That was the point of the article that you and others willfully ignore and spread FUD about.

    It is already a well known fact that batteries age.  The choices are battery replacements, random crashes or throttling. 

    My older iPhone 6 still has a strong battery so no noticeable throttling which I prefer over simply crashing.  The only thing to fault Apple on is to not make it more clear to users that throttling was occurring because their batteries are weak.

    Folks that report severe performance issues likely have some other problem.
  • Reply 113 of 123
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 2,699administrator
    danvm said:
    rjd185 said:
    jurassic said:
    sog35 said:
    My 6 Plus is lagging and slow since I upgraded to iOS 11

    ZDNet has an article today titled "Here's why your old iPhone feels slow -- and what you can do about it".

    All of the whiners who are crying about how Apple spilled their milk, should read it!

    ߤ䦬t;/div>
    Got here by accident reviewing today’s news. I had to sign up while having a little smile wondering how many posters here chiding people for having the temerity to think their older iPhones might be made to provide slower responses would be contemplating their humble pie. No conspiracy but a shameless lack of transparency and evasion about what was really happening. Perhaps less credulity from some folks including editors would go a little way to more balanced discussion. Enjoy and watch this space. 

    https://forums.appleinsider.com/discussion/203310/apple-responds-to-reports-of-worn-batteries-forcing-iphone-cpu-slowdowns/p1
    You're still wrong, though.

    With a properly performing battery, the phones are just as fast as they ever were. This test, and the GeekBench numbers utterly prove it. The conspiracy theory is bogus. Apple is still not slowing down phones to force you to buy a new one. 
    Some comments you posted in this article mention,

    The phones are literally the same speed as the day they were bought and these metrics are the proof. The difference is the load placed on them by the software.

    There is no Cook and Ive plot to turn down the processor and GPU speed. That's insane to even speculate, but yet, here we are.

    It does no such thing. The phone's hardware is identical and not throttled in any way.
    Does the software put additional load on the older hardware? Sure. But, that doesn't mean the phone is slower. It moves the bits from register to register just as fast as it always has.

    So you blame the issue to everything, but the CPU throttling, which was really happening.  Since the beginning you were wrong, same as the article. 

    I'm not sure how many times I need to say that your interpretation about a conspiracy theory to get people to buy new phones is wrong. You do you, I guess.
    edited December 2017
  • Reply 114 of 123
    danvmdanvm Posts: 569member
    danvm said:
    rjd185 said:
    jurassic said:
    sog35 said:
    My 6 Plus is lagging and slow since I upgraded to iOS 11

    ZDNet has an article today titled "Here's why your old iPhone feels slow -- and what you can do about it".

    All of the whiners who are crying about how Apple spilled their milk, should read it!

    ߤ䦬t;/div>
    Got here by accident reviewing today’s news. I had to sign up while having a little smile wondering how many posters here chiding people for having the temerity to think their older iPhones might be made to provide slower responses would be contemplating their humble pie. No conspiracy but a shameless lack of transparency and evasion about what was really happening. Perhaps less credulity from some folks including editors would go a little way to more balanced discussion. Enjoy and watch this space. 

    https://forums.appleinsider.com/discussion/203310/apple-responds-to-reports-of-worn-batteries-forcing-iphone-cpu-slowdowns/p1
    You're still wrong, though.

    With a properly performing battery, the phones are just as fast as they ever were. This test, and the GeekBench numbers utterly prove it. The conspiracy theory is bogus. Apple is still not slowing down phones to force you to buy a new one. 
    Some comments you posted in this article mention,

    The phones are literally the same speed as the day they were bought and these metrics are the proof. The difference is the load placed on them by the software.

    There is no Cook and Ive plot to turn down the processor and GPU speed. That's insane to even speculate, but yet, here we are.

    It does no such thing. The phone's hardware is identical and not throttled in any way.
    Does the software put additional load on the older hardware? Sure. But, that doesn't mean the phone is slower. It moves the bits from register to register just as fast as it always has.

    So you blame the issue to everything, but the CPU throttling, which was really happening.  Since the beginning you were wrong, same as the article. 

    I'm not sure how many times I need to say that your interpretation about a conspiracy theory to get people to buy new phones is wrong. You do you, I guess.
    I'm not talking of any conspiracy from Apple.  I'm point out that the article gave different reasons for iPhone's slow down, and even you didn't had any reason to believe that Apple would had throttle CPU's, but they did it.  Did they did it to sell more phones?  I don't know, neither do you.  But it's possible.  Remember, in your opinion, there was no chance of Apple throttling CPUs, and they did it. 
  • Reply 115 of 123
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 2,699administrator
    danvm said:
    danvm said:
    rjd185 said:
    jurassic said:
    sog35 said:
    My 6 Plus is lagging and slow since I upgraded to iOS 11

    ZDNet has an article today titled "Here's why your old iPhone feels slow -- and what you can do about it".

    All of the whiners who are crying about how Apple spilled their milk, should read it!

    ߤ䦬t;/div>
    Got here by accident reviewing today’s news. I had to sign up while having a little smile wondering how many posters here chiding people for having the temerity to think their older iPhones might be made to provide slower responses would be contemplating their humble pie. No conspiracy but a shameless lack of transparency and evasion about what was really happening. Perhaps less credulity from some folks including editors would go a little way to more balanced discussion. Enjoy and watch this space. 

    https://forums.appleinsider.com/discussion/203310/apple-responds-to-reports-of-worn-batteries-forcing-iphone-cpu-slowdowns/p1
    You're still wrong, though.

    With a properly performing battery, the phones are just as fast as they ever were. This test, and the GeekBench numbers utterly prove it. The conspiracy theory is bogus. Apple is still not slowing down phones to force you to buy a new one. 
    Some comments you posted in this article mention,

    The phones are literally the same speed as the day they were bought and these metrics are the proof. The difference is the load placed on them by the software.

    There is no Cook and Ive plot to turn down the processor and GPU speed. That's insane to even speculate, but yet, here we are.

    It does no such thing. The phone's hardware is identical and not throttled in any way.
    Does the software put additional load on the older hardware? Sure. But, that doesn't mean the phone is slower. It moves the bits from register to register just as fast as it always has.

    So you blame the issue to everything, but the CPU throttling, which was really happening.  Since the beginning you were wrong, same as the article. 

    I'm not sure how many times I need to say that your interpretation about a conspiracy theory to get people to buy new phones is wrong. You do you, I guess.
    I'm not talking of any conspiracy from Apple.  I'm point out that the article gave different reasons for iPhone's slow down, and even you didn't had any reason to believe that Apple would had throttle CPU's, but they did it.  Did they did it to sell more phones?  I don't know, neither do you.  But it's possible.  Remember, in your opinion, there was no chance of Apple throttling CPUs, and they did it. 
    Your premise relies on a phone with a compromised power source performing the same as a new out of the box one. That's where your theory falls down. You can't expect what is literally a damaged phone with a chemically depleted battery to operate as well as one that is perfectly functional.

    Fun fact? Phones crashing as a result of low voltage isn't new. On Android, the phones crash. On older iPhones, the phones crash hard, and is why the iPhone 5 won't come back to life sometimes after the battery is completely flat.

    Even the benchmark accumulation from Poole says that there is no throttling of a phone with a good battery, and he said so on the air on CNBC. That's what the original report cites also, and the premise of that article remains the same and is still accurate.

    The comment of mine you cited is in regards to an Apple conspiracy, so while you may not have been explicitly talking about it -- that's the context. There remains no conspiracy, as a perfectly functional phone is still the same speed as it was out of the box and not artificially slowed by the OS in any way, and the article you linked to says exactly that. 

    Apple said that they fixed the problem with random shutdowns with 10.2.1 in the release notes for the update -- and they did. The sin is the lack of detail presented to users.

    Regarding the "conspiracy" : which sells more phones, a phone that obviously crashes frequently, or one temporarily slowed that buyers outside of AI and Reddit probably don't notice or care about?

    The facts are pretty clear. There is no evidence of a conspiracy. There is evidence that there is not. If that changes, we'll certainly report about it.

    You're welcome to believe what you want, though. 
    edited December 2017
  • Reply 116 of 123
    danvmdanvm Posts: 569member
    danvm said:
    danvm said:
    rjd185 said:
    jurassic said:
    sog35 said:
    My 6 Plus is lagging and slow since I upgraded to iOS 11

    ZDNet has an article today titled "Here's why your old iPhone feels slow -- and what you can do about it".

    All of the whiners who are crying about how Apple spilled their milk, should read it!

    ߤ䦬t;/div>
    Got here by accident reviewing today’s news. I had to sign up while having a little smile wondering how many posters here chiding people for having the temerity to think their older iPhones might be made to provide slower responses would be contemplating their humble pie. No conspiracy but a shameless lack of transparency and evasion about what was really happening. Perhaps less credulity from some folks including editors would go a little way to more balanced discussion. Enjoy and watch this space. 

    https://forums.appleinsider.com/discussion/203310/apple-responds-to-reports-of-worn-batteries-forcing-iphone-cpu-slowdowns/p1
    You're still wrong, though.

    With a properly performing battery, the phones are just as fast as they ever were. This test, and the GeekBench numbers utterly prove it. The conspiracy theory is bogus. Apple is still not slowing down phones to force you to buy a new one. 
    Some comments you posted in this article mention,

    The phones are literally the same speed as the day they were bought and these metrics are the proof. The difference is the load placed on them by the software.

    There is no Cook and Ive plot to turn down the processor and GPU speed. That's insane to even speculate, but yet, here we are.

    It does no such thing. The phone's hardware is identical and not throttled in any way.
    Does the software put additional load on the older hardware? Sure. But, that doesn't mean the phone is slower. It moves the bits from register to register just as fast as it always has.

    So you blame the issue to everything, but the CPU throttling, which was really happening.  Since the beginning you were wrong, same as the article. 

    I'm not sure how many times I need to say that your interpretation about a conspiracy theory to get people to buy new phones is wrong. You do you, I guess.
    I'm not talking of any conspiracy from Apple.  I'm point out that the article gave different reasons for iPhone's slow down, and even you didn't had any reason to believe that Apple would had throttle CPU's, but they did it.  Did they did it to sell more phones?  I don't know, neither do you.  But it's possible.  Remember, in your opinion, there was no chance of Apple throttling CPUs, and they did it. 
    Your premise relies on a phone with a compromised power source performing the same as a new out of the box one. That's where your theory falls down. You can't expect what is literally a damaged phone with a chemically depleted battery to operate as well as one that is perfectly functional.

    I don't expect the battery life of a +2 year phone be the same as new.  But neither I expect the CPU performance degrade because of battery issues, and looks like neither you since the article makes no mention of battery issues. 

    Fun fact? Phones crashing as a result of low voltage isn't new. On Android, the phones crash. On older iPhones, the phones crash hard, and is why the iPhone 5 won't come back to life sometimes after the battery is completely flat.

    You can expect phones crashing and turning off unexpectedly because battery issues, but CPU throttling is a different story.  It was caused by Apple, and not technical reasons. 

    Even the benchmark accumulation from Poole says that there is no throttling of a phone with a good battery, and he said so on the air on CNBC. That's what the original report cites also, and the premise of that article remains the same and is still accurate.

    The premise of the article was right, and I have no issues with it.  But in reality, Apple was throttling CPU's by their own admission.  And it's not your fault, since no one knew what Apple was doing.

    The comment of mine you cited is in regards to an Apple conspiracy, so while you may not have been explicitly talking about it -- that's the context. There remains no conspiracy, as a perfectly functional phone is still the same speed as it was out of the box and not artificially slowed by the OS in any way, and the article you linked to says exactly that. 

    I made no mention of any conspiracy from Apple, since there is no proof of it.  And yes, a perfectly functional phone has no issues, but iPhone 6 and 6S are +2 years phones, and it's reasonable to think that most of them will have battery issues, and their CPU's will be throttled. 

    Apple said that they fixed the problem with random shutdowns with 10.2.1 in the release notes for the update -- and they did. The sin is the lack of detail presented to users.

    You know what would have fix random shutdowns and the CPU throttling issue Apple created?  A battery replacement.  Why Apple didn't advice users to replace their battery since the beginning?  Wasn't that a better option?

    Regarding the "conspiracy" : which sells more phones, a phone that obviously crashes frequently, or one temporarily slowed that buyers outside of AI and Reddit probably don't notice or care about?

    The facts are pretty clear. There is no evidence of a conspiracy. There is evidence that there is not. If that changes, we'll certainly report about it.

    You're welcome to believe what you want, though.

    Again, there is no evidence of a conspiracy, but neither there was evidence from Apple throttling CPU's, and look how it went.  What I believe isn't important, neither what you believe.  But the fact is that what Apple did, wasn't expected by many customers, including fans, and the results aren't good at all.


  • Reply 117 of 123
    SoliSoli Posts: 7,373member
    danvm said:
    danvm said:
    danvm said:
    rjd185 said:
    jurassic said:
    sog35 said:
    My 6 Plus is lagging and slow since I upgraded to iOS 11

    ZDNet has an article today titled "Here's why your old iPhone feels slow -- and what you can do about it".

    All of the whiners who are crying about how Apple spilled their milk, should read it!

    ߤ䦬t;/div>
    Got here by accident reviewing today’s news. I had to sign up while having a little smile wondering how many posters here chiding people for having the temerity to think their older iPhones might be made to provide slower responses would be contemplating their humble pie. No conspiracy but a shameless lack of transparency and evasion about what was really happening. Perhaps less credulity from some folks including editors would go a little way to more balanced discussion. Enjoy and watch this space. 

    https://forums.appleinsider.com/discussion/203310/apple-responds-to-reports-of-worn-batteries-forcing-iphone-cpu-slowdowns/p1
    You're still wrong, though.

    With a properly performing battery, the phones are just as fast as they ever were. This test, and the GeekBench numbers utterly prove it. The conspiracy theory is bogus. Apple is still not slowing down phones to force you to buy a new one. 
    Some comments you posted in this article mention,

    The phones are literally the same speed as the day they were bought and these metrics are the proof. The difference is the load placed on them by the software.

    There is no Cook and Ive plot to turn down the processor and GPU speed. That's insane to even speculate, but yet, here we are.

    It does no such thing. The phone's hardware is identical and not throttled in any way.
    Does the software put additional load on the older hardware? Sure. But, that doesn't mean the phone is slower. It moves the bits from register to register just as fast as it always has.

    So you blame the issue to everything, but the CPU throttling, which was really happening.  Since the beginning you were wrong, same as the article. 

    I'm not sure how many times I need to say that your interpretation about a conspiracy theory to get people to buy new phones is wrong. You do you, I guess.
    I'm not talking of any conspiracy from Apple.  I'm point out that the article gave different reasons for iPhone's slow down, and even you didn't had any reason to believe that Apple would had throttle CPU's, but they did it.  Did they did it to sell more phones?  I don't know, neither do you.  But it's possible.  Remember, in your opinion, there was no chance of Apple throttling CPUs, and they did it. 
    Your premise relies on a phone with a compromised power source performing the same as a new out of the box one. That's where your theory falls down. You can't expect what is literally a damaged phone with a chemically depleted battery to operate as well as one that is perfectly functional.

    I don't expect the battery life of a +2 year phone be the same as new.  But neither I expect the CPU performance degrade because of battery issues, and looks like neither you since the article makes no mention of battery issues.
    Saying the CPU has "degraded" is disingenuous. You might as well say that most Apple products ship with "degraded" CPUs and GPUs because Apple purposely underclocks most of them in order to main heat thresholds and battery life estimates.
    edited December 2017
  • Reply 118 of 123
    danvmdanvm Posts: 569member
    Soli said:
    danvm said:
    danvm said:
    danvm said:
    rjd185 said:
    jurassic said:
    sog35 said:
    My 6 Plus is lagging and slow since I upgraded to iOS 11

    ZDNet has an article today titled "Here's why your old iPhone feels slow -- and what you can do about it".

    All of the whiners who are crying about how Apple spilled their milk, should read it!

    ߤ䦬t;/div>
    Got here by accident reviewing today’s news. I had to sign up while having a little smile wondering how many posters here chiding people for having the temerity to think their older iPhones might be made to provide slower responses would be contemplating their humble pie. No conspiracy but a shameless lack of transparency and evasion about what was really happening. Perhaps less credulity from some folks including editors would go a little way to more balanced discussion. Enjoy and watch this space. 

    https://forums.appleinsider.com/discussion/203310/apple-responds-to-reports-of-worn-batteries-forcing-iphone-cpu-slowdowns/p1
    You're still wrong, though.

    With a properly performing battery, the phones are just as fast as they ever were. This test, and the GeekBench numbers utterly prove it. The conspiracy theory is bogus. Apple is still not slowing down phones to force you to buy a new one. 
    Some comments you posted in this article mention,

    The phones are literally the same speed as the day they were bought and these metrics are the proof. The difference is the load placed on them by the software.

    There is no Cook and Ive plot to turn down the processor and GPU speed. That's insane to even speculate, but yet, here we are.

    It does no such thing. The phone's hardware is identical and not throttled in any way.
    Does the software put additional load on the older hardware? Sure. But, that doesn't mean the phone is slower. It moves the bits from register to register just as fast as it always has.

    So you blame the issue to everything, but the CPU throttling, which was really happening.  Since the beginning you were wrong, same as the article. 

    I'm not sure how many times I need to say that your interpretation about a conspiracy theory to get people to buy new phones is wrong. You do you, I guess.
    I'm not talking of any conspiracy from Apple.  I'm point out that the article gave different reasons for iPhone's slow down, and even you didn't had any reason to believe that Apple would had throttle CPU's, but they did it.  Did they did it to sell more phones?  I don't know, neither do you.  But it's possible.  Remember, in your opinion, there was no chance of Apple throttling CPUs, and they did it. 
    Your premise relies on a phone with a compromised power source performing the same as a new out of the box one. That's where your theory falls down. You can't expect what is literally a damaged phone with a chemically depleted battery to operate as well as one that is perfectly functional.

    I don't expect the battery life of a +2 year phone be the same as new.  But neither I expect the CPU performance degrade because of battery issues, and looks like neither you since the article makes no mention of battery issues.
    Saying the CPU has "degraded" is disingenuous. You might as well say that most Apple products ship with "degraded" CPUs and GPUs because Apple purposely underclocks most of them in order to main heat thresholds and battery life estimates.
    One of the definitions of degrade "is to lower to an inferior or less effective level".  I think CPU throttling matches with the definition.
    https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/degrade

  • Reply 119 of 123
    SoliSoli Posts: 7,373member
    danvm said:
    Soli said:
    danvm said:
    danvm said:
    danvm said:
    rjd185 said:
    jurassic said:
    sog35 said:
    My 6 Plus is lagging and slow since I upgraded to iOS 11

    ZDNet has an article today titled "Here's why your old iPhone feels slow -- and what you can do about it".

    All of the whiners who are crying about how Apple spilled their milk, should read it!

    ߤ䦬t;/div>
    Got here by accident reviewing today’s news. I had to sign up while having a little smile wondering how many posters here chiding people for having the temerity to think their older iPhones might be made to provide slower responses would be contemplating their humble pie. No conspiracy but a shameless lack of transparency and evasion about what was really happening. Perhaps less credulity from some folks including editors would go a little way to more balanced discussion. Enjoy and watch this space. 

    https://forums.appleinsider.com/discussion/203310/apple-responds-to-reports-of-worn-batteries-forcing-iphone-cpu-slowdowns/p1
    You're still wrong, though.

    With a properly performing battery, the phones are just as fast as they ever were. This test, and the GeekBench numbers utterly prove it. The conspiracy theory is bogus. Apple is still not slowing down phones to force you to buy a new one. 
    Some comments you posted in this article mention,

    The phones are literally the same speed as the day they were bought and these metrics are the proof. The difference is the load placed on them by the software.

    There is no Cook and Ive plot to turn down the processor and GPU speed. That's insane to even speculate, but yet, here we are.

    It does no such thing. The phone's hardware is identical and not throttled in any way.
    Does the software put additional load on the older hardware? Sure. But, that doesn't mean the phone is slower. It moves the bits from register to register just as fast as it always has.

    So you blame the issue to everything, but the CPU throttling, which was really happening.  Since the beginning you were wrong, same as the article. 

    I'm not sure how many times I need to say that your interpretation about a conspiracy theory to get people to buy new phones is wrong. You do you, I guess.
    I'm not talking of any conspiracy from Apple.  I'm point out that the article gave different reasons for iPhone's slow down, and even you didn't had any reason to believe that Apple would had throttle CPU's, but they did it.  Did they did it to sell more phones?  I don't know, neither do you.  But it's possible.  Remember, in your opinion, there was no chance of Apple throttling CPUs, and they did it. 
    Your premise relies on a phone with a compromised power source performing the same as a new out of the box one. That's where your theory falls down. You can't expect what is literally a damaged phone with a chemically depleted battery to operate as well as one that is perfectly functional.

    I don't expect the battery life of a +2 year phone be the same as new.  But neither I expect the CPU performance degrade because of battery issues, and looks like neither you since the article makes no mention of battery issues.
    Saying the CPU has "degraded" is disingenuous. You might as well say that most Apple products ship with "degraded" CPUs and GPUs because Apple purposely underclocks most of them in order to main heat thresholds and battery life estimates.
    One of the definitions of degrade "is to lower to an inferior or less effective level".  I think CPU throttling matches with the definition.
    https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/degrade
    Again, you're claiming that Apple sells nearly every device—including the brand new iMac Pro—with degraded components.

    PS: Do you decorate your tinfoil hat for Christmas or would you consider hat to be too much tinsel?
  • Reply 120 of 123
    danvmdanvm Posts: 569member
    Soli said:
    danvm said:
    Soli said:
    danvm said:
    danvm said:
    danvm said:
    rjd185 said:
    jurassic said:
    sog35 said:
    My 6 Plus is lagging and slow since I upgraded to iOS 11

    ZDNet has an article today titled "Here's why your old iPhone feels slow -- and what you can do about it".

    All of the whiners who are crying about how Apple spilled their milk, should read it!

    ߤ䦬t;/div>
    Got here by accident reviewing today’s news. I had to sign up while having a little smile wondering how many posters here chiding people for having the temerity to think their older iPhones might be made to provide slower responses would be contemplating their humble pie. No conspiracy but a shameless lack of transparency and evasion about what was really happening. Perhaps less credulity from some folks including editors would go a little way to more balanced discussion. Enjoy and watch this space. 

    https://forums.appleinsider.com/discussion/203310/apple-responds-to-reports-of-worn-batteries-forcing-iphone-cpu-slowdowns/p1
    You're still wrong, though.

    With a properly performing battery, the phones are just as fast as they ever were. This test, and the GeekBench numbers utterly prove it. The conspiracy theory is bogus. Apple is still not slowing down phones to force you to buy a new one. 
    Some comments you posted in this article mention,

    The phones are literally the same speed as the day they were bought and these metrics are the proof. The difference is the load placed on them by the software.

    There is no Cook and Ive plot to turn down the processor and GPU speed. That's insane to even speculate, but yet, here we are.

    It does no such thing. The phone's hardware is identical and not throttled in any way.
    Does the software put additional load on the older hardware? Sure. But, that doesn't mean the phone is slower. It moves the bits from register to register just as fast as it always has.

    So you blame the issue to everything, but the CPU throttling, which was really happening.  Since the beginning you were wrong, same as the article. 

    I'm not sure how many times I need to say that your interpretation about a conspiracy theory to get people to buy new phones is wrong. You do you, I guess.
    I'm not talking of any conspiracy from Apple.  I'm point out that the article gave different reasons for iPhone's slow down, and even you didn't had any reason to believe that Apple would had throttle CPU's, but they did it.  Did they did it to sell more phones?  I don't know, neither do you.  But it's possible.  Remember, in your opinion, there was no chance of Apple throttling CPUs, and they did it. 
    Your premise relies on a phone with a compromised power source performing the same as a new out of the box one. That's where your theory falls down. You can't expect what is literally a damaged phone with a chemically depleted battery to operate as well as one that is perfectly functional.

    I don't expect the battery life of a +2 year phone be the same as new.  But neither I expect the CPU performance degrade because of battery issues, and looks like neither you since the article makes no mention of battery issues.
    Saying the CPU has "degraded" is disingenuous. You might as well say that most Apple products ship with "degraded" CPUs and GPUs because Apple purposely underclocks most of them in order to main heat thresholds and battery life estimates.
    One of the definitions of degrade "is to lower to an inferior or less effective level".  I think CPU throttling matches with the definition.
    https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/degrade
    Again, you're claiming that Apple sells nearly every device—including the brand new iMac Pro—with degraded components.

    PS: Do you decorate your tinfoil hat for Christmas or would you consider hat to be too much tinsel?
    What I said is based in that Apple admitted they throttled CPU's in iPhones with battery issues.  And nobody knew or expected it, and that's the reason you saw articles like this, trying to prove that Apple wasn't doing it.  So it looks like the customers that claimed their phones were slow, which in your opinion were wearing tinfoil hats, were right all along. 
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