Futuremark analysis debunks rumor that Apple slows older iPhones down on purpose with iOS ...

Posted:
in iPhone edited October 2017
Benchmarking firm Futuremark has weighed in on claims that Apple is intentionally slowing down older iPhones to encourage upgrades, with analysis of benchmark results indicating iPhones maintain their performance over time instead of deteriorating.

Image Credit: Wylsacom on YouTube
Image Credit: Wylsacom on YouTube


To answer allegations of Apple purposefully holding back previous iPhone models via changes in iOS, Futuremark compiled data from its free 3DMark benchmarking tool, gathering results submitted by users. The company found that iOS updates largely kept iPhones running at a similar level of performance.

Data came from 3DMark's Sling Shot Extreme Graphics and Extreme Physics tests, used to measure the GPU and CPU performance respectively. Specifically, Futuremark turned to the average score for each device over the course of a month.

Looking at the iPhone 5s, the oldest device examined, a graph showing GPU performance reveals the average score has remained relatively stable between April 2016 and September 2017, with expected minor variations from month to month. A similar story was found with the phone's CPU performance, its score barely changing between months, the most recent average falling just slightly when compared with the earliest record.

"The graphs for CPU performance show a very slight drop in performance over time -- possibly due to minor iOS updates or other factors -- but a user would be unlikely to notice this small difference in everyday use," a Futuremark statement reads.




For the iPhone 6, GPU performance scores increased over time, with a small but noticeable jump at the time of iOS 10's release, and another larger increase for iOS 11. CPU performance did gradually decay in the results, though only slightly, with the graph leveling off from May 2017 onward.

In iPhone 6s graphs, GPU performance peaked for the introduction of iOS 10, before slightly dropping off and leveling again from May 2017. There is a very modest decline in CPU performance, though with no significant score shifts.

Lastly, iPhone 7 GPU performance did waver over time, with a fair boost visible for the last bar of the chart, representing the launch of iOS 11, but no major deterioration. CPU performance decreases towards the end of the chart, but again this shows only a marginal change over time.



"Our benchmarking data shows that, rather than intentionally degrading the performance of older models, Apple actually does a good job of supporting its older devices with regular updates that maintain a consistent level of performance across iOS versions," writes Futuremark.

The firm does note that there are some factors that may make users perceive a loss of performance after updating the operating system. These include updates introducing new resource-intensive features, new apps developed for newer hardware not running as smoothly, and older apps failing to take advantage of optimizations in later iOS releases.

There is also the human factor, Futuremark suggests. "There is always the psychological effect of knowing that there is a new and improved model available, which can make your own device seem outdated."

Another investigation into iOS upgrades for older devices, published in September, found that Apple's own apps became only marginally slower.

Benchmark scores are usually seen as a way to compare mobile devices against each other, though sometimes this can be an unreliable indicator. In 2013, Samsung was caught cheating in benchmarks, by including code within the operating systems of the Galaxy S4 and the Note 3 to make the processors run at maximum capacity if a benchmarking app was detected.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 123
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 1,818member
    Were they hired by Apple to deal with this growing PR problem?

    Benchmarks are well known not to translate to real-world usage. The biggest complaints are with GUI, restart, and app load slowdowns, not CPU or GPU functionality. No testing done on those facets, right?

    The most vocal complaints overall are with the "just upgraded" times after a new iOS comes out. Every apologist tells us why we should mock complainers as ignorant fools, and Apple rest on their laurels with that as the community solution, rather than actually addressing that issue themselves once and for all.

    It isn't even a question: Apple want you to keep buying the same hardware products every year. Now that they have phones and iPads, they can push an even faster upgrade cycle than with Macs. They are a hardware company using minimal software development to lure new buyers, who eventually may discover that the development of that software only supports selling the bullet point new features of each iOS, which sells iPhones (not continued maturation of the software product). In fact, their iOS developments have actually harmed their prior quality software development, like iWork (being back-ported from iOS to Mac OS, trashing hundreds of features and installing a clumsy GUI).

    Yes, there is a push to upgrade to a new phone. Yes, the OS is the push. No, Apple don't optimize iOS for any device but the newest. Yes, planned obsolescence is a real thing. The computer industry has made it so much more blatant than any other industry and has accelerated the same in every industry that sells computerized product: Push product out prematurely, ignore the software bugs, push out the successor ASAP, and abandon the predecessor.
    muthuk_vanalingamairnerd
  • Reply 2 of 123
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,337administrator
    Okay, look, here's the reality. The public perception is that Apple has somehow crippled the hardware with an OS update, forcing users to buy new phones.

    Guess what. Newer software means heavier software demands. The phones are literally the same speed as the day they were bought and these metrics are the proof. The difference is the load placed on them by the software.

    There is no plot or conspiracy. There is no shadowy cabal demanding that code get bloated to force users to buy a new phone. There is no Cook and Ive plot to turn down the processor and GPU speed. That's insane to even speculate, but yet, here we are. Planned obsolescence as a conspiracy to force hardware sales isn't a thing.

    Do you want your phone to be the same as the day you took it out of the box? Never update your software. Problem solved.
    edited October 2017 RacerhomieXStrangeDaysmacseekerOferJWSCcalicharlesgrestxsbaker752old4funmagman1979
  • Reply 3 of 123
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,289member
    Isn't there usually a reindexing of the Spotlight service after a major OS update that could affect performance if the user tries it out before that service has finished its initial rescan?
    RacerhomieXnetroxwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 123
    RacerhomieXRacerhomieX Posts: 95unconfirmed, member
    For whining folks ,disable wifi .Never use the internet. Never use apps ,never update. Your phone will remain shiny forever. iPhone 5S was from 2013.My one runs fine. The fact that you still get software support with new features is awesome.
    badmonkcornchipaylkwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 123
    cmd-zcmd-z Posts: 29member
    I have to believe that device backups that get carried from one iOS version to another that span years of activity and clutter just don't always play nice with an iOS update. Those that have issues ought to try a fresh install with no prior backup, as painful as that may be, and see improved performance.
    aylk
  • Reply 6 of 123
    RacerhomieXRacerhomieX Posts: 95unconfirmed, member
    sog35 said:
    My 6 Plus is lagging and slow since I upgraded to iOS 11
    My one is fine on 11.0.2
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 123
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,408member
    Okay, look, here's the reality. The public perception is that Apple has somehow crippled the hardware with an OS update, forcing users to buy new phones.

    No, that is not the public perception. It is the perception of the wannabe tech crowd that loiters in comment sections making wild, unfounded, unconfirmed, irrational claims.
    RacerhomieXJWSCcali2old4funandrewj5790badmonkwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 8 of 123
    If you think it's a problem, don't upgrade your OS.  That's what I do with my computers.  If you don't upgrade the OS your device will continue to work, just the way it has, just the way it did when you bought it.  Nobody is forced into upgrading.  And, if you really want the latest OS and are worried about your device being rendered unusable, or at least, slowed, then upgrade your device.  Everybody has options here.
    edited October 2017 RacerhomieXking editor the gratebadmonkwatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 123
    RacerhomieXRacerhomieX Posts: 95unconfirmed, member
    Yes ,new software will have bugs. So ,wait a few weeks as it gets fixed.
    6 Plus, on 11.0.2 performance is fine. No issues here.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 123
    RacerhomieXRacerhomieX Posts: 95unconfirmed, member
    sog35 said:
    Okay, look, here's the reality. The public perception is that Apple has somehow crippled the hardware with an OS update, forcing users to buy new phones.

    Guess what. Newer software means heavier software demands. The phones are literally the same speed as the day they were bought and these metrics are the proof. The difference is the load placed on them by the software.

    There is no plot or conspiracy. There is no shadowy cabal demanding that code get bloated to force users to buy a new phone. There is no Cook and Ive plot to turn down the processor and GPU speed. That's insane to even speculate, but yet, here we are. Planned obsolescence as a conspiracy to force hardware sales isn't a thing.

    Do you want your phone to be the same as the day you took it out of the box? Never update your software. Problem solved.
    but will the phone still be safe if you don't update the OS? honest question.
    Thats one of the reasons you should upgrade.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 123
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 5,632member
    dysamoria said:
    Were they hired by Apple to deal with this growing PR problem?

    Benchmarks are well known not to translate to real-world usage. The biggest complaints are with GUI, restart, and app load slowdowns, not CPU or GPU functionality. No testing done on those facets, right?

    The most vocal complaints overall are with the "just upgraded" times after a new iOS comes out. Every apologist tells us why we should mock complainers as ignorant fools, and Apple rest on their laurels with that as the community solution, rather than actually addressing that issue themselves once and for all.

    It isn't even a question: Apple want you to keep buying the same hardware products every year. Now that they have phones and iPads, they can push an even faster upgrade cycle than with Macs. They are a hardware company using minimal software development to lure new buyers, who eventually may discover that the development of that software only supports selling the bullet point new features of each iOS, which sells iPhones (not continued maturation of the software product). In fact, their iOS developments have actually harmed their prior quality software development, like iWork (being back-ported from iOS to Mac OS, trashing hundreds of features and installing a clumsy GUI).

    Yes, there is a push to upgrade to a new phone. Yes, the OS is the push. No, Apple don't optimize iOS for any device but the newest. Yes, planned obsolescence is a real thing. The computer industry has made it so much more blatant than any other industry and has accelerated the same in every industry that sells computerized product: Push product out prematurely, ignore the software bugs, push out the successor ASAP, and abandon the predecessor.
    What uninformed bullshit. Apple certainly does optimize on devices older than the latest. This is why it is unarguable fact that iOS devices have the longest useful lifespans of the industry with the longest support. Unlike Androids where even flagships are abandonware immediately after launch. If you have facts to the contrary, please share them. 

    But, as with all computing platforms, as the software increases in capability so must the hardware requirements. It is unrealistic and quite foolish to expect old computing devices to run new platforms with identical performance as new hardware with increased capability. How anyone can believe that it's instead an evil corporation twirling their waxed mustaches trying to screw you is a mystery. I'm guessing you don't work with computing technology very much.

    Anyway the real proof is the resale market -- unlike your conspiracy theory, people actually understand this and are willing to pay premium prices for used devices, unlike the knockoffs.


    Oferentropyscharlesgres2old4funmagman1979welshdogwatto_cobrasuddenly newtonjony0
  • Reply 12 of 123
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,337administrator
    sog35 said:
    Okay, look, here's the reality. The public perception is that Apple has somehow crippled the hardware with an OS update, forcing users to buy new phones.

    Guess what. Newer software means heavier software demands. The phones are literally the same speed as the day they were bought and these metrics are the proof. The difference is the load placed on them by the software.

    There is no plot or conspiracy. There is no shadowy cabal demanding that code get bloated to force users to buy a new phone. There is no Cook and Ive plot to turn down the processor and GPU speed. That's insane to even speculate, but yet, here we are. Planned obsolescence as a conspiracy to force hardware sales isn't a thing.

    Do you want your phone to be the same as the day you took it out of the box? Never update your software. Problem solved.
    but will the phone still be safe if you don't update the OS? honest question.
    I didn't say anything about safety.

    And, to answer your question, in all likelihood, no.
    2old4fun
  • Reply 13 of 123
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 5,632member

    Okay, look, here's the reality. The public perception is that Apple has somehow crippled the hardware with an OS update, forcing users to buy new phones.

    Guess what. Newer software means heavier software demands. The phones are literally the same speed as the day they were bought and these metrics are the proof. The difference is the load placed on them by the software.

    There is no plot or conspiracy. There is no shadowy cabal demanding that code get bloated to force users to buy a new phone. There is no Cook and Ive plot to turn down the processor and GPU speed. That's insane to even speculate, but yet, here we are. Planned obsolescence as a conspiracy to force hardware sales isn't a thing.

    Do you want your phone to be the same as the day you took it out of the box? Never update your software. Problem solved.
    No, we must eternally whine because we are entitled to do so! We are not customers voting with our dollars, but rather prisoners, held hostage by the nefarious Apple corporate devil! Can't you see!?
    edited October 2017 tmaymagman1979RonnnieOwatto_cobrasuddenly newtonjony0
  • Reply 14 of 123
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,337administrator
    sog35 said:
    dysamoria said:
    Were they hired by Apple to deal with this growing PR problem?

    Benchmarks are well known not to translate to real-world usage. The biggest complaints are with GUI, restart, and app load slowdowns, not CPU or GPU functionality. No testing done on those facets, right?

    The most vocal complaints overall are with the "just upgraded" times after a new iOS comes out. Every apologist tells us why we should mock complainers as ignorant fools, and Apple rest on their laurels with that as the community solution, rather than actually addressing that issue themselves once and for all.

    It isn't even a question: Apple want you to keep buying the same hardware products every year. Now that they have phones and iPads, they can push an even faster upgrade cycle than with Macs. They are a hardware company using minimal software development to lure new buyers, who eventually may discover that the development of that software only supports selling the bullet point new features of each iOS, which sells iPhones (not continued maturation of the software product). In fact, their iOS developments have actually harmed their prior quality software development, like iWork (being back-ported from iOS to Mac OS, trashing hundreds of features and installing a clumsy GUI).

    Yes, there is a push to upgrade to a new phone. Yes, the OS is the push. No, Apple don't optimize iOS for any device but the newest. Yes, planned obsolescence is a real thing. The computer industry has made it so much more blatant than any other industry and has accelerated the same in every industry that sells computerized product: Push product out prematurely, ignore the software bugs, push out the successor ASAP, and abandon the predecessor.
    What uninformed bullshit. Apple certainly does optimize on devices older than the latest. This is why it is unarguable fact that iOS devices have the longest useful lifespans of the industry with the longest support. Unlike Androids where even flagships are abandonware immediately after launch. If you have facts to the contrary, please share them. 

    But, as with all computing platforms, as the software increases in capability so must the hardware requirements. It is unrealistic and quite foolish to expect old computing devices to run new platforms with identical performance as new hardware with increased capability. How anyone can believe that it's instead an evil corporation twirling their waxed mustaches trying to screw you is a mystery. I'm guessing you don't work with computing technology very much.

    Anyway the real proof is the resale market -- unlike your conspiracy theory, people actually understand this and are willing to pay premium prices for used devices, unlike the knockoffs.


    The point is I don't want to run NEW features.

    I just want the same features I had when I first bought the phone.

    Bottom line is an iPhone gets slower after each major iOS release. That is a FACT.
    It does no such thing. The phone's hardware is identical and not throttled in any way.

    Does the software put additional load on the older hardware? Sure. But, that doesn't mean the phone is slower. It moves the bits from register to register just as fast as it always has.

    And, for the record, my SE loads apps at the same speed that it did on iOS 11.
    edited October 2017 entropyscalimagman1979StrangeDaysroundaboutnowking editor the gratewatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 15 of 123
    dysamoria said:
    Were they hired by Apple to deal with this growing PR problem?

    Benchmarks are well known not to translate to real-world usage. The biggest complaints are with GUI, restart, and app load slowdowns, not CPU or GPU functionality. No testing done on those facets, right?

    The most vocal complaints overall are with the "just upgraded" times after a new iOS comes out. Every apologist tells us why we should mock complainers as ignorant fools, and Apple rest on their laurels with that as the community solution, rather than actually addressing that issue themselves once and for all.

    It isn't even a question: Apple want you to keep buying the same hardware products every year. Now that they have phones and iPads, they can push an even faster upgrade cycle than with Macs. They are a hardware company using minimal software development to lure new buyers, who eventually may discover that the development of that software only supports selling the bullet point new features of each iOS, which sells iPhones (not continued maturation of the software product). In fact, their iOS developments have actually harmed their prior quality software development, like iWork (being back-ported from iOS to Mac OS, trashing hundreds of features and installing a clumsy GUI).

    Yes, there is a push to upgrade to a new phone. Yes, the OS is the push. No, Apple don't optimize iOS for any device but the newest. Yes, planned obsolescence is a real thing. The computer industry has made it so much more blatant than any other industry and has accelerated the same in every industry that sells computerized product: Push product out prematurely, ignore the software bugs, push out the successor ASAP, and abandon the predecessor.
    It is unrealistic and quite foolish to expect old computing devices to run new platforms with identical performance as new hardware with increased capability. How anyone can believe that it's instead an evil corporation twirling their waxed mustaches trying to screw you is a mystery.
    A few years ago I bought a boat and a truck that could pull it effortlessly.  The next year, even though I liked my boat I upgraded it to a slightly larger one.  My truck had to work a little harder to pull the larger boat but it was mostly fine.  So, again, the next year I upgraded to a slightly larger boat, same truck.  This happened a few years in a row and now my truck sucks at pulling this big boat I own.  Ford obviously screwed me.
    RonnnieOStrangeDaysandrewj5790welshdogwatto_cobraelectrosoftjony0
  • Reply 16 of 123
    entropysentropys Posts: 1,261member
    It doesnt get slower, an old iPhone with a lesser capacity SOC just has more trouble running the latest software, which is more demanding. 

    Edit: snap, editor.
    edited October 2017 watto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 123
    cmd-zcmd-z Posts: 29member
    sog35 said:
    sog35 said:
    Okay, look, here's the reality. The public perception is that Apple has somehow crippled the hardware with an OS update, forcing users to buy new phones.

    Guess what. Newer software means heavier software demands. The phones are literally the same speed as the day they were bought and these metrics are the proof. The difference is the load placed on them by the software.

    There is no plot or conspiracy. There is no shadowy cabal demanding that code get bloated to force users to buy a new phone. There is no Cook and Ive plot to turn down the processor and GPU speed. That's insane to even speculate, but yet, here we are. Planned obsolescence as a conspiracy to force hardware sales isn't a thing.

    Do you want your phone to be the same as the day you took it out of the box? Never update your software. Problem solved.
    but will the phone still be safe if you don't update the OS? honest question.
    I didn't say anything about safety.

    And, to answer your question, in all likelihood, no.
    So not updating is not an option.

    Why can't we have a third option?  Why can't Apple just give us safety updates without updating the entire OS?

    My 6 Plus was crazy fast the first year I owned it.  Now its like an Android phone.
    You do have a third option, restore your iPhone to iOS 11 *without* the backup you've probably been carrying for years ... it WILL be snappier.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 123
    sog35 said:
    sog35 said:
    dysamoria said:
    Were they hired by Apple to deal with this growing PR problem?

    Benchmarks are well known not to translate to real-world usage. The biggest complaints are with GUI, restart, and app load slowdowns, not CPU or GPU functionality. No testing done on those facets, right?

    The most vocal complaints overall are with the "just upgraded" times after a new iOS comes out. Every apologist tells us why we should mock complainers as ignorant fools, and Apple rest on their laurels with that as the community solution, rather than actually addressing that issue themselves once and for all.

    It isn't even a question: Apple want you to keep buying the same hardware products every year. Now that they have phones and iPads, they can push an even faster upgrade cycle than with Macs. They are a hardware company using minimal software development to lure new buyers, who eventually may discover that the development of that software only supports selling the bullet point new features of each iOS, which sells iPhones (not continued maturation of the software product). In fact, their iOS developments have actually harmed their prior quality software development, like iWork (being back-ported from iOS to Mac OS, trashing hundreds of features and installing a clumsy GUI).

    Yes, there is a push to upgrade to a new phone. Yes, the OS is the push. No, Apple don't optimize iOS for any device but the newest. Yes, planned obsolescence is a real thing. The computer industry has made it so much more blatant than any other industry and has accelerated the same in every industry that sells computerized product: Push product out prematurely, ignore the software bugs, push out the successor ASAP, and abandon the predecessor.
    What uninformed bullshit. Apple certainly does optimize on devices older than the latest. This is why it is unarguable fact that iOS devices have the longest useful lifespans of the industry with the longest support. Unlike Androids where even flagships are abandonware immediately after launch. If you have facts to the contrary, please share them. 

    But, as with all computing platforms, as the software increases in capability so must the hardware requirements. It is unrealistic and quite foolish to expect old computing devices to run new platforms with identical performance as new hardware with increased capability. How anyone can believe that it's instead an evil corporation twirling their waxed mustaches trying to screw you is a mystery. I'm guessing you don't work with computing technology very much.

    Anyway the real proof is the resale market -- unlike your conspiracy theory, people actually understand this and are willing to pay premium prices for used devices, unlike the knockoffs.


    The point is I don't want to run NEW features.

    I just want the same features I had when I first bought the phone.

    Bottom line is an iPhone gets slower after each major iOS release. That is a FACT.
    It does no such thing. The phone's hardware is identical and not throttled in any way.

    Does the software put additional load on the older hardware? Sure. But, that doesn't mean the phone is slower. It moves the bits from register to register just as fast as it always has.

    And, for the record, my SE loads apps at the same speed that it did on iOS 11.
    people don't care if the CPU/GPU is as fast as the day they bought it.

    But that's the point of the article: some people think it's a 'conspiracy' by Apple to intentionally make the device slower.  Futuremark is simply saying everything still works as it did when new under a current OS.  The phone isn't slower, it's just working harder to achieve similar results.  No conspiracy, that's the point.
    StrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 123
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,337administrator
    sog35 said:
    sog35 said:
    dysamoria said:
    Were they hired by Apple to deal with this growing PR problem?

    Benchmarks are well known not to translate to real-world usage. The biggest complaints are with GUI, restart, and app load slowdowns, not CPU or GPU functionality. No testing done on those facets, right?

    The most vocal complaints overall are with the "just upgraded" times after a new iOS comes out. Every apologist tells us why we should mock complainers as ignorant fools, and Apple rest on their laurels with that as the community solution, rather than actually addressing that issue themselves once and for all.

    It isn't even a question: Apple want you to keep buying the same hardware products every year. Now that they have phones and iPads, they can push an even faster upgrade cycle than with Macs. They are a hardware company using minimal software development to lure new buyers, who eventually may discover that the development of that software only supports selling the bullet point new features of each iOS, which sells iPhones (not continued maturation of the software product). In fact, their iOS developments have actually harmed their prior quality software development, like iWork (being back-ported from iOS to Mac OS, trashing hundreds of features and installing a clumsy GUI).

    Yes, there is a push to upgrade to a new phone. Yes, the OS is the push. No, Apple don't optimize iOS for any device but the newest. Yes, planned obsolescence is a real thing. The computer industry has made it so much more blatant than any other industry and has accelerated the same in every industry that sells computerized product: Push product out prematurely, ignore the software bugs, push out the successor ASAP, and abandon the predecessor.
    What uninformed bullshit. Apple certainly does optimize on devices older than the latest. This is why it is unarguable fact that iOS devices have the longest useful lifespans of the industry with the longest support. Unlike Androids where even flagships are abandonware immediately after launch. If you have facts to the contrary, please share them. 

    But, as with all computing platforms, as the software increases in capability so must the hardware requirements. It is unrealistic and quite foolish to expect old computing devices to run new platforms with identical performance as new hardware with increased capability. How anyone can believe that it's instead an evil corporation twirling their waxed mustaches trying to screw you is a mystery. I'm guessing you don't work with computing technology very much.

    Anyway the real proof is the resale market -- unlike your conspiracy theory, people actually understand this and are willing to pay premium prices for used devices, unlike the knockoffs.


    The point is I don't want to run NEW features.

    I just want the same features I had when I first bought the phone.

    Bottom line is an iPhone gets slower after each major iOS release. That is a FACT.
    It does no such thing. The phone's hardware is identical and not throttled in any way.

    Does the software put additional load on the older hardware? Sure. But, that doesn't mean the phone is slower. It moves the bits from register to register just as fast as it always has.

    And, for the record, my SE loads apps at the same speed that it did on iOS 11.
    you are getting technical

    people don't care if the CPU/GPU is as fast as the day they bought it.

    All they care about is it takes longer to open Safari, Mail, Messages, ect.


    How utterly shocking. Generally, science and specs are technical, yes. "Feels" are not.

    This is literally what this article is about - the facts and science behind it, and not the feelings behind it. The phone remains the same speed. There is no conspiracy. Apple is not turning down the speed of your phone.
    edited October 2017 2old4funmagman1979StrangeDaysradarthekatwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 20 of 123
    I think Apple really needs to prioritize not doing new whizbang effects on the home screen when switching between apps. The new ones in iOS 11 are still pretty jarring and they're probably the major reason people think it's slower.
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