Class-action lawsuit accuses Apple of misrepresenting iPhone storage with iOS 8

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  • Reply 221 of 368
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iaeen View Post





    I owned a 16 GB iPhone 5 before upgrading to a 64 GB 6. To say it was nearly unusable goes way beyond hyperbole. It worked just fine.



    Of course, there were times when I had to delete stuff to free up storage (OTA iOS 8 update springs to mind), but I managed. What do you expect from a device with the least amount of storage you can get?



    In any case, this isn't relevant to the case. What's relevant is the fact that the entire electronics industry has marketed devices this way from the beginning.

    BS. 

     

    First of all, I have the iPhone 6+ 128 GB Gold I just bought, so I know I have a good size of memory.

     

    HOWEVER, advertise what you sell!!!

     

    Apple should lead the industry in GOOD WILL and saying that their phones have this much but only hold "this much".

     

    you are an informed consumer. Many are not. If I was not initially an iPhone or smartphone user, I'd think, yeah, 16 GB I have to add stuff.

     

    THIS IS AN OLD ARGUMENT. FAILED WITH 12.1 COMPUTERS BEING 13" ADVERTISED SCREENS.

     

    TIME TO WAKE UP APPLE AND SPREAD GOOD WILL111

     

    AS AN APPLE USER SINCE 1978, APPLE CAN  BL0W. "MEET THE OLD BOSS, SAME AS THE OLD BOSS".

  • Reply 222 of 368
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismY View Post



    There is iCloud which makes dumping Documents and Data files easy..

    Hmm, you may have missed a point in the argument being raised by the plaintiffs...

  • Reply 223 of 368
    Hmm, you may have missed a point in the argument being raised by the plaintiffs...

    I'm well aware of the plaintiff's argument. I'm responding to your comment.
  • Reply 224 of 368
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismY View Post



    I'm well aware of the plaintiff's argument. I'm responding to your comment.

    I happen to know about iCloud.

     

    The salient issue in this entire thread is about what an iOS device offers as usable space versus what is advertised. And a lot of it is based off Malax's point about what should be advertised.

     

    If Apple would like us to treat iCloud as an appendage to storage, I believe it should: (i) say so; (ii) offer some minimal amount of iCloud storage, say 5GB, with each device (rather than each user account). Otherwise, the issue of iCloud is irrelevant to what's being discussed here (except for the plaintiff's stupid point about Apple using iCloud as a revenue-generator).

  • Reply 225 of 368
    I happen to know about iCloud.

    The salient issue in this entire thread is about what an iOS device offers as usable space versus what is advertised. And a lot of it is based off Malax's point about what should be advertised.

    If Apple would like us to treat iCloud as an appendage to storage, I believe it should: (i) say so; (ii) offer some minimal amount of iCloud storage, say 5GB, with each device (rather than each user account). Otherwise, the issue of iCloud is irrelevant to what's being discussed here (except for the plaintiff's stupid point about Apple using iCloud as a revenue-generator).

    1) Your reply to me was about curation. I answered a comment about iCloud making clean up easier than before for the developers that use it as well as agreed that it should be easy for the user. In what way is your comment to me about the plaintiff's stated issue with 16GB of storage on the device or me saying you don't know that iCloud exists?

    2) What system would allow 5GiB of storage per device sale that could be easily reversed without any issues with overuse if the device is returned or sold at some later time? I think the better solution is to simply offer more than a measly 5GiB.
  • Reply 226 of 368
    rogifan wrote: »
    OK I have a dice game on my iPhone (it's called Dice Free). App size is 46.9MB but 'Documents & Data' is 160MB. What the heck is that and how do I get rid of it without deleting and reinstalling the app? The Twitter app I use - Hootiesuite - has an app size of 35.4MB but 'Documents & Data' is 379MB. I have no idea what that is (I'm assuming it's some kind of cached data) and there's no way to get rid of it without deleting and reinstalling the app. It's this 'Documents & Data' stuff that ends up taking up a lot of space with no easy way to reclaim it.

    Documents & Data are your old text messages. it's not an individual app, it's a culmination of data collected from notes to all the wifi locations you have saved and all the text you refuse to delete.

    Clear out all old texts, or set it to delete messages older then x# of days, forget all wifi locations as you leave them and delete all your notes.

    it's ridiculous to think that, that data won't take up space. My fiancé had text messages from 2009 and notes from 2007, and had a similar issue, with backing up. Not anymore since iOS 8. iOS 8 included the delete after so many days function which helps a lot.

    as far as the lawsuit goes, there is no possible way to account for the stupidy of the masses. It's getting to a point, that I don't want kids, because I don't want them to grow into this society of stupid people.
  • Reply 227 of 368
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jfc1138 View Post



    "The 8gb iPhone they offered I believe can't even do an OS upgrade unless you remove just about everything on it."



    Ignoring the easy path of simply connecting the phone to a host computer? In which case nothing has to be removed to do an iOS upgrade.

     

    You are misinformed, it can be upgraded just fine through itunes unless your very close to full capacity near and upgrade.

  • Reply 228 of 368
    foggyhill wrote: »
    You are misinformated, it can be upgraded just fine through itunes unless your very close to full capacity near and upgrade.

    That's what he wrote.
  • Reply 229 of 368
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    Documents & Data are your old text messages. it's not an individual app, it's a culmination of data collected from notes to all the wifi locations you have saved and all the text you refuse to delete.

    Clear out all old texts, or set it to delete messages older then x# of days, forget all wifi locations as you leave them and delete all your notes.

    it's ridiculous to think that, that data won't take up space. My fiancé had text messages from 2009 and notes from 2007, and had a similar issue, with backing up. Not anymore since iOS 8. iOS 8 included the delete after so many days function which helps a lot.

    as far as the lawsuit goes, there is no possible way to account for the stupidy of the masses. It's getting to a point, that I don't want kids, because I don't want them to grow into this society of stupid people.

    What do text messages have to do with a dice game or Twitter app? Right now iOS is telling me the Twitter app I use has 382MB of 'Documents & Data'. There is no way for me to clear this in Settings, the only option I have is to delete the app. Same with the Dice game that's taking up 158MB of 'Documents & Data'. If that's because of sloppy developers isn't it Apple's job to make sure developers aren't producing sloppy apps? After all they approve apps and curate the App Store.
  • Reply 230 of 368
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    foggyhill wrote: »
    You are misinformated, it can be upgraded just fine through itunes unless your very close to full capacity near and upgrade.

    Who the heck wants to use iTunes if they don't have to?
  • Reply 231 of 368
    rogifan wrote: »
    Who the heck wants to use iTunes if they don't have to?

    If you improperly calculated your short and long-term storage capacity needs for your device to the point that it's impossible to keep everything you have -and- download a major YoY update -and- create the temporary swap partitions needs for the installation to take place on the device then you do "have to" if you want the update.
  • Reply 232 of 368

    I agree with the lawsuit. I was unable to upgrade my mom's 8gb iPhone 4S to iOS 8 because there wasn't enough room to download it even though she had no apps, pictures or music on it.

  • Reply 233 of 368
    solipsismy wrote: »
    1) Your reply to me was about curation. I answered a comment about iCloud making clean up easier than before for the developers that use it as well as agreed that it should be easy for the user. In what way is your comment to me about the plaintiff's stated issue with 16GB of storage on the device or me saying you don't know that iCloud exists?

    2) What system would allow 5GiB of storage per device sale that could be easily reversed without any issues with overuse if the device is returned or sold at some later time? I think the better solution is to simply offer more than a measly 5GiB.

    I have no idea what your post is about, at this point.

    Here's wishing you a wonderful 2015. :)
  • Reply 234 of 368
    Originally Posted by hentaiboy View Post

    Yes but some of these devices feature removeable storage making this a non issue.

     

    Except they can’t store anything on that storage. Not apps or anything the system would use, at least.

  • Reply 235 of 368
    malax wrote: »
    And, as you can see, they make no mention of the fact that a few GB of storage is used up regardless of what size you get.

    It looks like Apple dropped the ball on this one, and it may end of costing them.

    I can't even imagine this getting on the court docket. From the dawn of the computer hard disk it's been the common practice to list the storage capacity of the device and NOT net storage capacity available to the user. It's no different for solid state storage regardless of the company's name on the device.

    I own a 16 GB iPhone and iPad. I struggled to decide if I should buy bigger storage devices (I knew I could be kind of a resource hog). I decided to go with the 16GB devices and considered my decision would lead me to understand my needs better in the future.

    1. I will most certainly buy more device capacity in the future. I found that be deleting apps (storing them for free in Apple iCloud) was a way of keeping my devices with enough extra space. The same works for music and other media I buy from Apple's iTunes store. If I delete some songs from my iDevice, it is still available for me to enjoy automatically. Of the FIVE GB Apple gives me in the iCloud, I have used only one GB...that after over two years. I have not felt any need to purchase more iCloud storage or even sign up for iTunes Match.

    2. Apple isn't even the worst one to advertise storage capacity and then use up some for the OS. Micrisift's first generation Surface hardware actually used more then HALF of the minimum configuration SSD for the OS... this is way beyond what Apple uses.

    3. In my eyes this is again an attempt by a money-hungry lawyer using the court system to bring a high-payoff class-action case to snatch part of Apple mountain of cash.
  • Reply 236 of 368

    As someone who does have a modicum of understanding in why I do not get 16GB for myself when I buy a 16GB device, I still end up dreaming about using the entire 16GB space. It is just that the average customers are wired that way.

     

    The only way to properly drill the difference in would be for almost PSA style campaigns highlighting the difference in what is advertised and what you actually get. People seem to accept 16/32/64/128 pretty well now, rather than 10/100/1000. A little more public awareness and they will get used to "16 means 12.8*", "32 means 28.8*" etc.

    Advertising as 12.8, 28.8, etc. is pretty daft and you'd still open yourself to lawsuits if you were off by even a bit.

     

    Personally, for some of us, there will never be enough space. I use a 128GB iPad and iPhone and wish for 256GB. I plan on buying a 3TB Time Capsule but will immediately wish it was 4TB. 

     

     

    *approximations on my part.

  • Reply 237 of 368
    dunksdunks Posts: 1,254member
    I don't think Apple should be selling 8GB devices anymore but I fail to see how this is different from what has been standard industry practice for some time.
  • Reply 238 of 368
    I think the fact that everybody does it like this, doesn't make it right. If you sell a device with 16 gb. of internal storage, but only 13 of those gb. are available for the consumers data, then it should at least be written in a note somewhere.
    It may be obvious (or common knowledge) to some people that of course a portion of the memory is taken by the OS. But to non-technical people, how should they know this? Back in the days of MP3 players, I bought a 256 mb. Creative MuVo player. This device didn't take up any space of the storage. So I guess there is no universal rule that some portion is always going to be eaten by the OS.
    I don't think there is enough for a lawsuit here and I certainly don't think it is right to sue. But I think the industry should be forced by law to at least specify actual user storage amount next to the total amount. As seen here: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2545258/Samsung-Galaxy-S4-owners-just-HALF-storage-paid-bloatware.html this can vary greatly, so why isn't it right there with the other specs.?
  • Reply 239 of 368
    irnchrizirnchriz Posts: 1,606member
    The formatted capacity of a 16GB device is 14.88GB. So you never get 16GB anyway. Any formatted drive loses approximately 7% of its capacity straight away and then a chunk to the operating system. This is standard across the industry.
  • Reply 240 of 368
    The court may ultimately dismiss this case, but the lawsuit still brings attention to the unfairness. Indeed, Apple has its cake and eats it too. It severely limits the amount of storage on its devices and also charges the customers when they have to get more from iCloud -- and just so the customers can keep their devices running.
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